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Full text of "CTA transit news"

NORTHWESTERN UNlV,i 
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. ;V 4 2001 




... 


TRANSPORTATIOI 


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Why ban 
the buck? 



One of the ways that we can help keep costs down during 
this time of financial crisis is to encourage our riders to 
refrain from using dollar bills to pay CTA fares. The 
Operations Planning, Treasury, and Externa! Affairs 
departments have been working together to get the 
message to our riders. But these efforts can only be suc- 
cessful if all of us. especially operating employees, 
courteously remind our riders that we need their help and 
thank them for cooperating. 

Daniel Perk, manager. Treasury, explained the serious- 
ness of the problem: "The daily flood of dollar bills into 
the fare boxes on board CTA buses is costing the Authori- 
ty $5 million to $6 million a year. This awesome deluge of 
dollar bills has to be brought down and kept under 
control." 

A dramatic rise in dollar bills deposited in fare boxes 
began after the basic fare was raised to 90 cents on July 
6, 1981. 

John O'Connor, director, Central Counting, cited ex- 
amples: 

"On April 1, 1981, when the basic fare was 80 cents, we 
counted 85,034 dollar bills from bus fare boxes. On 
September 9, 1981, the number of dollar bills had soared 
to 296,320. It was a flood of dollar bills in the Central 
Counting Room. Our staff could not possibly count that 
many bills: we also had a dramatic increase in dam- 
aged bus fare boxes jammed with dollar bills." 

The dollar bills had to be bagged and shipped to con- 
tracted banks for counting, and damaged fare boxes had to 
be sent to repair shops. 

Perk cited two defenses in this dilemma of the dollar bills. 

"The first defense— I call them our front line— are our bus 
operators. Most of our operators are familiar with many of 
their riders. If our operators urge their 'regulars' not to use 
dollar bills for fares, and to pass the word along to their 
friends who ride CTA buses, this will help stem the flow. 

"I urge all bus operators to stress to riders the 
economical use of discounted CTA tokens— 10 for $8.50: 
the more economical use of the $40 monthly unlimited 
riding pass, or the use of coins to pay fares. 

"By stopping the flood of dollar bills, CTA may be able 
to save enough money to help stabilize the fares at their 
present levels. It serves our riders' interests not to use 
dollar bills. 

"I hope all CTA employees— rail, administration, as 
well as bus operations— will spread the word to their trans- 
it riding friends— don't use dollar bills for bus fares." 

Perk said the second defense against the use of dollar 
bills is CTA's continual reminder to the news media urging 
riders to refrain from putting paper money in bus fare 
boxes that are designed to process coins only. 

(continued, page 2) 





Machinist Frank Williams removes a damaged cash box from a 
fare box at CTA's Central Counting facility. The cost of repairing 
damaged fare collection equipment and processing and counting 
dollar bills has become a serious problem for CTA and other 
major transit systems. 



£ta 



TRANS T NEW 



FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

JANUARY, 1982 




Ban the buck! 

(continued from page 1) 

On October 4, 1981, CTA launched its "Ban the Buck" 
campaign. News releases to the radio, television, and 
newspaper outlets helped bring down the high number of 
dollar bills used. Window signs in buses, "L" trains, and 
stations urged riders not to use dollar bills for fares. 

"The riders* response was wonderful," O'Connor said. 
"The number of incoming dollar bills dropped down to 
about 40,000 a day. The number of damaged fare boxes 
also dropped." 

But this success was short-lived. Bus riders were again 
depositing increasing numbers of dollar bills in fare boxes, 
as demonstrated by the January 8, 1982, dollar bill count 
of 111.597. 

So, on January 17, 1982, Phase II of the "Ban the 
Buck" campaign began. 

Revised window signs took a harder line in stressing the 
economic advantages of the program to our riders, and 
new bus windshield signs read "NO DOLLAR BILLS." 

Bus operators were instructed to hand a special leaflet to 
dollar-bill depositing riders. The leaflet read: 

"Next time please cooperate. Don't use dollar 
bills. Save yourself and the CTA money. Use: 
tokens, monthly pass or exact change." 
In addition, a 30-second broadcast by Michael 
Horowitz, General External Affairs Manager, over 12 
Chicago radio stations made this plea to riders: 

"The CTA needs your help— the use of dollar bills 
in bus fare boxes is up again. We can't afford it. We 
cut 35 million dollars from our budget— but your 
continued use of dollar bills could cost us up to six 
million dollars this year— and that means higher 
fares or less service to you the rider. Let's help each 
other — use a monthly pass — discounted tokens— or 
exact change — but not dollar bills. Save yourself and 
the CTA money. Your CTA thanks you." 




Window signs in vehicles and stations continually remind our 
riders that they can save money by using toltens and monthly 
passes Instead of dollar bills. The "NO dollar bills" sign on bus 
windshields (top, left) has been very effective. 

Recent dollar bill counts indicate that the second phase 
of the "Ban the Buck" campaign is reducing the use of 
dollar bills. But experience also has demonstrated that our 
riders, although willing to cooperate, must be frequently 
reminded that we really do need and appreciate their help. 

You, our operating employees, can make this program a 
success through your all-important daily contact with our 
riders, by courteously asking them to refrain from using 
dollar bills, and thanking them for their cooperation. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Pass sales leader 

A certificate of special recognition is presented to Walter Kozubowski (left), Chicago 
City Clerk, as a token of appreciation for thie high volume of CTA riding passes sold. The 
Clerk's office reported $ 2,058,880 in riding passes sold for the month of December, 
which was the highest sales volume of riding passes for 1981 recorded at any CTA retail 
location. Making the presentation at the Clerk's annual Christmas party is CTA General 
External Affairs Manager Michael N. Horowitz. 



Safety first 




The Lawson National Distributing company of Houston, Texas, a minority vendor, will 
provide the CTA with 20 new mini-buses for use in the special transportation service for 
mobility limited riders. CTA Chairman Eugene M. Barnes who signed the contract, gets 
a handshake from Danny Lawton, president of the distributing company. Manufacturer 
Larry Burton of Carpenter Body Works, Mitchell, Ind. (seated left), was also on hand. 
Others present for the $2.2 million contract signing were (from left): Larry Pianto, 
Manager, Materials Management; Harold H. Geissenheimer, General Operations 
Manager; Joel Ettinger, UMTA Regional Administrator; CTA Executive Director 
Theodore G. Schuster, and Ernest Sawyer, Administrative Assistant to the Executive 
Director. The contract signing took place on December 22. 



The old adage that "an ounce of preven- 
tion is worth a pound of cure" never had 
more meaning for anyone than it does 
now for plant maintenance carpenter 
Turner Holmes. Holmes prevented 
disaster by wearing safety glasses as he 
and other carpenters were renovating a 
platform decking at the Chicago avenue 
Ravenswood station recently. A 20 pen- 
ny nail glanced by Holmes' hammer sud- 
denly was a projectile which struck his 
glasses and shattered the right lens, but 
did not cause injury. "Everybody should 
wear safety glasses, " said Holmes 
following the incident. 



Below left: Fourteen employees at South 
Shops received certificates of appren- 
ticeship completion recently. On hand 
for the occasion were (from left): Body 
Shops unit supervisor Al Haas, and 
Mechanical Shop unit supervisor James 
Forrestal. Certificates were presented to 
Scott Litt, mechanic; James Mutnansky 
and Richard Parrish, machinists; Aaron 
Morris, mechanic; Glennis Buford, 
carpenter; David Rivera, mechanic; Per- 
cy Harrell, carpenter; Jpseph Garner, 
mechanic; Martin Murasl^i, sheet metal 
worker; Richard Murray and Walter 
Wheeler, mechanics. Frank Venezia, 
superintendent, Bus Shops, and Nick 
Simonetti, unit supervisor. Unit Rebuild, 
were also present. Unavailable to 
receive their certificates during the 
presentations were Mark Arroyo, 
mechanic; Jim Jankus, carpenter, an't 
Robert McClelland, welder. 




JANUARY, 1982 




Levy Johnson (77th Street 
garage) was applauded by 
Mrs. Zubaydah Madyun, of 
East 38th Street, for the way 
he handled unruly riders on 
his #4 Cottage Grove bus. 
"As we approached 63rd 
Street, someone started 
smoking, and the driver im- 
mediately stopped the bus 
and demanded those smok- 
ing (reefers) to put them out. 
He said he wasn't moving un- 
til this was done, and the of- 
fenders complied without 
hesitation. We really ap- 
preciated this. It is very in- 
sulting and offensive to get 
on the bus after a hard day's 
work and be confronted with 
this sort of abuse." 



James Brown (Limits garage) 
was commended by Laura 
Meade, who rode his #145 
Wilson/Michigan Express bus 
to her office on South 
Michigan Avenue. "He is an 
outstanding example of 
grace under pressure. It 
seemed that no one who got 
on the bus knew their way 
around Chicago. They asked 
if he stopped at such-and- 
such a street or what the fare 
was for senior citizens. He 
was warm and helpful with 
everyone, patiently answer- 
ing a constant stream of 
questions. He warned disem- 
barking passengers about 
construction sites, etc. In 
short, his whole attitude com- 
municated tremendous care 
and concern for people." 




commendation corner 



Gregory Williams (South Section) was the conductor of 
a Jackson Park/Howard train that Oliver Young Jr. was 
riding early one morning to his home on South Michigan 
Avenue. "Right away I sensed he had total control of his 
train. He reminded youths entering with snacks that no 
eating was allowed, and announced that smoking was pro- 
hibited. When two young men sat down next to an older 
man who was sleeping, he announced, 'Pickpocketing is not 
allowed on this train. All passengers are cautioned to watch 
their belongings.' The would-be culprits grinned sheepishly 
and bolted for the door at the next stop." 

• • • 

Leon White (Limits garage) was the operator of an early 
morning #135 Wilson/LaSalle bus taken by Joan Landi, of 
Winona Street. "He takes pride in his job and appearance, 
and is always courteous. He knows who his regular riders 
are, and if they are not at their stop, he'll look to see if they 
are coming. He always takes the time to give polite, detailed 
directions to people who ask. He takes time to care about 
people, and he still manages to keep his schedule. I know I'll 
be on time and have a safe, pleasant ride to work when I see 
him behind the wheel." 

• • • 

Edward Geddes Sr. (77th Street garage) was ap- 
preciated by Dora Hodo, of University Avenue, for his 
courtesy on a #3 King Drive bus. "Never have I encountered 
such a polite, courteous, kind and accommodating driver. 
Already he had picked up almost a full load of other senior 
citizens, yet he was patient with us boarding. He was 
solicitous of us as we left the bus, urging each of us to be 
careful and watch our step as we alighted. All too often we 
find time to criticize public employees, but seldom take the 
time to praise them when they so generously deserve it, as 
did this driver." 



Robert Martinez (North Park garage) was the operator 
of a #151 Sheridan bus ridden by Rosalind Fischer, of North 
Sheridan Road. "He is one the CTA can be proud of. He 
said 'Good morning' to each person boarding his bus, and 
when asked a question, he answered in a civil voice. He 
pulled into the curbs to take on and discharge passengers, 
aiding any senior citizens by being helpful in seeing they 
didn't fall. Also, he is neat in appearance with a haircut and 
no beard. It was a pleasure to see a driver make such a neat, 
clean appearance. He is to be commended." 

• • • 

John Cameron (South Section) was praised by Lina 
Jones, of Dorchester Avenue, for the way he handled his 
duties as conductor of a Lake/Dan Ryan train . "He gave the 
time of day, the temperature, information on what station 
we were approaching, and, if transferring, what buses to 
take. Finally, the cordial statements of 'Watch your step and 
purses' and 'Have a good day' made the topping on the 
cake. After we left the train, we talked about the refreshing 
face and voice because it is such a joy to know someone 
who cares, is nice, and loves people." 

• • • 

Jacques Yezeguielian (Forest Glen garage) was 
thanked for his careful, courteous operation of a #64 
Foster/Lawrence bus by Charlotte Argall, of Raschcr 
Avenue. "It was very rainy, and he warned passengers to 
watch out for the mud, and even stopped in a position so 
they could avoid it. As we approached Harlem and Foster, 
he announced to the students on board that there were a 
number of senior citizens getting on with grocery bags, and 
he expected everyone under 17 to give them a seat. There 
was no protest from the young folks, and they immediately 
got up. It was clear he was a friend of all his passengers." 

• • • 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees honored with a 'Day in CTA' 



Outstanding performance by three 
Transportation department em- 
ployees won them special recognition as 
"Day in CTA" honorees last month. 

Transportation department manage- 
ment presented a certificate of special 
recognition to Gordon A. Butler, a 
ticket agent who averted theft of services 
by more than 100 riders who were using 
counterfeit passes. A special assistant to 
Transportation Manager James Blaa 
said Butler confiscated 42 bogus passes 
in one day. 

Other honorees were Thomas 
Davis, a Washington garage bus 
operator, and Roman J. Doubek, a 
motorman on the Douglas rapid transit 
line. 

When Davis received no response at 
the home of a southside user of Access 
Transportation, he notified the Control 
Center. Police were summoned to the 
address immediately, where officers 
found that the patron, although not at 




Roman Doubek 



Gordon A. Butler 



Thomas Davis 



home, had left the gas on in her apart- 
ment. Operator Davis was praised for 
alerting authorities to a potential danger. 
Special recognition was also given to 
Roman Doubek for stopping his train 
in time to prevent a possible suicide. 



Doubek brought the train to a halt im- 
mediately when a man jumped from the 
roof of a shelter onto the roof of the train 
at Damen avenue. A controller sum- 
moned police who took the man into 
custody. 



Thanks - for a job well done 



Ruth Adkins, Archer 

Charles Alexander, 52nd Street 

William Banks, North Avenue 
Rosaria Barreca, Forest Glen 
Jaime Benavides, North Park 
Gustavo Bran, Forest Glen 

Jean Cage, Limits 
Lynette Clopton, Lawndale 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Jaime Colon, North Park 
Josephine Crouse, North Section 

Lee Dagon, North Avenue 
William Delgado, Lawndale 
Joseph DiMartino, Forest Glen 

James Fitzgerald, Limits 

George Gavrilos, North Park 



John Lemond, North Park 
Melvin Little Jr., North Park 
Hilda Lopez, North Park 

Angel Martinez, North Park 
Frederick Moore, North Park 
Howard Moore, 52nd Street 
Abraham Morgan, North Avenue 

Everett Odle, Forest Glen 
Dianna Owens, North Park 

Claudette Panfil, North Park 
Elbert Pearson, 69th Street 
Donnell Prater, North Park 
Maurice Preacely, Archer 
James Przybylski, North Park 

Eugene Reid, Limits 
Jose Rivera, Forest Glen 



Employees who have received commenda- 
tions since the last listing. 

Harrell Walker, 52nd Street 
Edward Woodard Jr., Howard 

David Young, Limits 
Mohamed Yousef, Limits 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 



Juan Gonzalez, North Park 


Vincent Shayer, Limits 


George Gray, Archer 


Edward Springer, North Park 




Angelo Sturino, Howard/Kimball 


Georgia Harris, 52nd Street 


Robert Surita, 77th Street 


Mary Hill, 77th Street 






Martin Troglia, Limits 


Jettie Jackson, Lawndale 


Ina Tuff, Archer 


Willie James, North Park 




Arthur Joe, Schedules 


Amador Velez Sr., Washington 




Garage 


Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland Terminal 




JANUARY, 1982 






Sharon A. Nyzcak, 23, daughter of 
Dorothy Nyzcak, Payroll, received a 
bachelor of science degree in biology 
from DePaul University. Sharon is cur- 
rently wforking in veterinary medicine 
and plans to return to school in 
September. 



Garage 
leaders retire 



Six bus garage superintendents and 
assistant superintendents recently 
retired after 205 years of CTA service. 

Victor Johnson, 63, superintend- 
ent, North Park garage, ended his 34 
year career in public transit with his 
retirement January 1. Johnson and 
his wife, Ruth, moved from their 
Medinah, 111., home to New Port 
Richey, Fla., where he plans to do 
some fishing, golfing, and continue his 
woodworking hobby. The Johnsons 
have a son, a daughter, and five 
grandchildren. 

John White, 62, superintendent of 
the 69th Street garage, retired 
January 1, ending his 34-year career 
in public transit. White and his wife, 
Emily, have a son, a daughter, seven 
grandchildren, and two great- 
grandchildren. White and his wife plan 
to remain in their south side home, 
and he plans to take up golfing as a 
hobby. 

Arthur Tabel, 62, completed 35 
years in public transit with his retire- 
ment January 1. Tabel was 
superintendent of the North Avenue 
garage. He and his wife, LaVerne, 
have a son and two grandchildren. 
The couple plan to remain in their 
northwest side home. 

Francis Zeiger, 61, assistant 
superintendent, 77th Street garage, 
ended his 35-year career in public 
transit with his retirement January 1. 
Zeiger and his wife. Marguerite, have 
three sons, two daughters, and eight 
grandchildren. The Zeigers plan to re- 




Victor Johnson 


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Arthur Tabel 




Francis Zeiger 



Ray Trezise 



Edward Weston 



main in their Beverly home and do 
some traveling, and he plans to con- 
tinue his ceramics hobby. 

Ray Trezise, 60, closed out his 
36-year public transit career January 1 
when he retired as an assistant 
superintendent of the 69th Street 
garage. Trezise and his wife, Dolores, 
have two sons, a daughter, and a 
grandchild and plan to remain in their 
Oak Lawn home. Trezise and his wife 
are veteran campers and plan to travel 



to Texas' Big Bend National Park and 
other places throughout the country. 

Edward Weston, 62, completed 
31 years in public transit January 1 
with his retirement. Weston was Forest 
Glen garage assistant superintendent. 
He and his wife, Virginia, have three 
sons, a daughter, and 12 grand- 
children. The Westons plan to remain 
in their home in Niles which Weston 
built by hand. His hobby is woodwork- 
ing. 



47th Street progress 

View of new southbound platform at 47th Street 'L' 
station on the North-South route. When $1 million sta- 
tion remodeling job is finished later this year, both plat- 
forms will have modern sodium vapor lights. There will 
be a new brick station, stainless steel agent's booth and 
passenger controls, a new concession stand, and 
fluorescent lighting throughout the station and stairs. 
The new station and platforms replaces a facility built in 
1892 - 90 years ago. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



New Pioneer officers announce '82 schedule 



The CTA Pioneers Retirement club 
has slated four "Ladies Day" lun- 
cheons with dancing parties for 1982. 
They are February 9 - Valentine 
party; May 11 • Mother's Day; 
September 4 • Back to School 
party; and December 14 
-Christmas party. 

The Pioneers meet the second 
Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. 
in the Golden Flame restaurant, Hig- 
gins and Nagle avenues. Luncheon is 
served at 1:30 p.m. For further infor- 
mation, telephone "Pinky" Moran at 
763-6379. 




Recently elected CTA Pioneers club officers for 1982 look over schedule of events for the 
new year. They are (from left) Melvin Horning, 1st vice president; Walter Steinbeiss, 
treasurer; Maynard "Pinky" Moran, president; Carl Nelson, 2nd vice president, and 
Warren Scholl, secretary. The Pioneers, founded in 1975, have more than 600 members. 



Frank Corbett, 
Chester Urban 
retire from 
Schedules 



On December 28, Frank Corbett, 
63, and Chester Urban, 57, of the 
Operations Planning department, 
were honored at a luncheon in the 
Merchandise Mart's M&M Club, in 
celebration of their January 1 
retirements. 

More than 50 employees, pen- 
sioners, and special guests attending 
the luncheon heard accolades be- 
stowed upon the honorees by Opera- 
tions Planning Manager Harold 
Hirsch, Director of Schedules Walter 
Thomas, Superintendent of Schedules 
Preparation Norman Oswald, and 
Robert LaVoie, master of ceremonies. 
Corbett's son, Patrick, a law student, 
also had words of praise for his father. 

Others among the guests were Cor- 
bett's wife, Veronica, and Urban's 
wife, Jean. The honorees were each 
presented with a monetary gift from 
their co-workers. 

Corbett, a senior schedule clerk, 
leaves the CTA after 36 years of ser- 
vice in the schedule section. He joined 
the Chicago Surface Lines in 1945 as 
a traffic checker, and was subsequent- 
ly promoted through the ranks to 
senior schedule clerk II. 

The Corbetts plan to sell their 
Chicago home and move to Florida, 




Newly-retired Schedule section employees Chester Orban (left) and Frank Corbett and 
their wives, Mrs. Jean Urban and Mrs. Veronica Corbett, pause for a photographic 
memento during festivities at the M&M Club. Together, Urban and Corbett celebrated the 
completion of 66 years of service as transit employees. 



after their son's graduation from law 
school and subsequent marriage in 
August. Immediate plans call for 
visiting their daughter, Nancy, in 
California. 

Chester Urban, a schedule maker, is 
retiring after 30 years of service. His 
early retirement was prompted by a 
need to devote full time providing 
therapy for his two-year-old grandson 
who is a victim of Wedermann- 
Hofferman's disease. 

Urban was a member of the Polish 
Army during World War II. After the 
war, he was discharged in England 
where he took a job as a public transit 



bus operator and conductor. The 
same year, he came to the United 
States and joined the CTA after a brief 
stint as a factory worker. 

He was hired as a conductor and 
moved through several positions as a 
bus operator, traffic checker. Claims 
department locator, security officer, 
storeroom clerk, and schedule maker. 

Urban gained popularity with his co- 
workers for his ability to speak seven 
languages. Besides his native Polish 
and English, he speaks Italian, 
Spanish, German, Syrian, and at least 
two dialects of the Russian language. 



JANUARY, 1982 



■ BRAINSTORMING 



Operators 
discuss benefits 
of calling all stops 

Occasionally riders, particularly the very young 
or elderly, depend upon bus operators to call 
streets. In winter weather, even regular riders rely 
upon hearing the street name called. 

Brainstorming sessions conducted at all 10 
garages last month gave CTA bus operators more 
insight on Rule B2.4.1 which requires that 
operators announce all stopping places. Instructors 
explained the benefits to be derived by both the 
rider and operator when this rule is observed. 

Instructor Joe Bennett told operators at a 77th 
Street garage session that calling stops not only 
serves the public, but creates pride in the job. 

"It lets the public know that we are Professionals, 
and it gives them Respect for us. It also gives us the 
Integrity which we need to get the job done. Calling 
streets shows that our operators are Dependable 
and Efficient. Together, they spell PRIDE--pride in 
our jobs because we are providing efficient 



transportation," said Bennett. 

Since the brainstorming sessions on Rule B2.4.1 
began, instructors have noticed an increased 
number of operators announcing streets, accord- 
ing to Frank Jones, an instructor at 77th Street 
garage. 

The special attention given to announcing stops 
by operators since the brainstorming sessions began 
has not gone unnoticed by riders. North Avenue 
operator Michael Ollins said one rider, a deaf-mute, 
gave him a card which indicated that although he 
could not hear, he does read lips. Ollins said the 
rider expressed his appreciation to him for calling 
his stops. 

Other operators at North Avenue who par- 
ticipated in the sessions said announcing stops not 
only keeps them alert, but keeps riders from going 
beyond their stops, and eliminates friction be- 
tween riders and the bus operator. 

Bus instructor Dan McKinney told operators at 
North Avenue that announcing stops could result in 
fewer complaints registered by the riding public. 
McKinney said it would also help operators to 
become familiar with their routes and gain respect 
from the riding public. 

"It is definitely the professional approach to this 
job, and it is good public relations," McKinney said. 



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CIA TRANSIT NEWS 



Riders appreciate 
stop announcements 

Announcing all the stops along bus routes is an important 
part of providing service for our riders. Proof of this may be 
found in these excerpts from commendations received by 
the Customer Assistance section of the Consumer Services 
department. 

"...She was very courteous--announcing every 
stop... and telling us to take our time, and be careful getting 
off the bus..." 

"...He was a most pleasant driver... and his attitude was 
most commendable. He called out all the stops, which drew 
chuckles from some riders, but most people thanked him for 
the ride upon departing..." 

"...He is very courteous, and above all he called out all 
the streets, which was a big help..." 

"...(The) driver handled the bus very well... informed us 
of the route and each stop as it was approached... most in- 
formative and helpful, while taking an efficient interest in 
what she was doing..." 

"...1 had noticed the driver for his excellent rapport with 
the passengers, his courtesy in giving directions, thanking 
passengers for their fare, and particularly for his unfailing 
statement of each coming stop..." 



"...I feel that the man deserves a recommendation. He 
called out all the streets from Chicago to Addison in a clear 
voice..." 

"...Your driver called the streets out in a loud and clear 
voice, which was a great help, as the visibility of the street 
signs was impaired due to the weather..." 

"...He called all stops clearly, advised the passengers to 
be careful in stepping down from the bus, and greeted those 
who entered..." 

"...I observed that this young woman was pleasant and 
friendly to all the passengers. And she not only handled the 
bus well but, in a pleasant voice, gave constant information. 
She called out all the streets, giving pertinent additional in- 
formation at times... As we approached cross-town bus 
lines, she called out the number of the bus line we were ap- 
proaching and mentioned whether it was one way east, one 
way west, or went in both directions..." 

"...She is a good driver, announces the names of streets 
and the time of day. She even, upon leaving Foster and 
Marine on the express trip downtown, announces the time 
at which the bus will arrive at Delaware. In other words, she 
is a gem and should be held up as an example to other 
drivers..." 

"...He was very helpful to the elderly and blind by loudly 
calling out the streets for everyone to hear. I don't normally 
write, but I felt you should know that you have a driver that 
is doing an excellent job for you..." 





Opposite page: Bus operators at North 
Avenue enthusiastically share ex- 
periences where calling out stops has 
helped their riders. 

Left above: While conducting a brainstor- 
ming session on Rule B2.4.1 at 77th Street 
garage, Joe Bennett explains how calling 
stops along bus routes is good public rela- 
tions for bus operators. Instructor Sam- 
mie Anderson (left) was available to assist 
in the discussion. 

Above: Instructor Dan McKlnney leads the 
discussion concerning Rule B2.4.1 at 
North Avenue garage. 

Left: Bus operators in the train room at 
77th Street garage share their ideas about 
announcing stops, listen attentively, and 
take notes on the discussion. 



JANUARY. 1982 



Retirements 




Don RieSS ^'^- Anita Curtis, director, Placement- 
Employment, prepares to unveil gift plaque 
(right) honoring Don Riess on his retirement as an employment In- 
terviewer. Riess' wife, Vivian, shares her husband's anticipation. 
Riess, 62, retired January 1 after 43 years of service in public 
transit. He started with the Chicago Surface Lines in 1 939 at West 



Shops as a truck shop booth clerk, and he was appointed inter- 
viewer in the Placement-Employment section in 1960. 

More than 100 persons attended the farewell party where Riess 
was given a ski jacket, a tool box, and the historical plaque (made 
by Tom Boyle, manager. Safety) honoring his career. Riess and 
his wife live in Norridge and plan to vacation in Florida. 




Chester Rusakiewicz On December 28, more than 100 
friends and co-workers attended 
a luncheon in the M&M Club honoring Chester "Rusty" 
Rusakiewicz (center), 63, and his wife, Mary. Rusty retired January 
1, ending his 33-year career in the Engineering department, where 
he began working in 1948 as an electrolysis tester. Roy Smith 
(left), superintendent. Civil Engineering, and George Millonas 
(right), manager, Engineering, thanked Rusty for his outstanding 
job performance throughout his career. Rusty and his wife plan to 
continue living in Schaumburg, and they will do some traveling. 
Rusty also plans to pursue his golf and fishing hobbies. 



Tony Salkas 

Tony Salkas, 62, electrical worker, 
closes out 40 years of service with the 
CTA and predecessor companies as he 
accepts his retirement folder from Bus 
Shops Superintendent Frank Venezia. 
Leading the host of co-workers wishing 
Salkas a fond farewell are Alfred Haas 
(left), unit supervisor, and Roy Hagen 
(right), foreman. 



Eric Blakely Photographer Eric Blakely receives his retire- 
ment papers from Roger Wood (left), 
manager. Management Services, at an open house in the 
Reproduction Services section, which was attended by Blakely's 
wife, Evelyn (right), and more than 100 friends and co-workers. 

Blakely began his 33-year career in June, 1948, as a bus 
operator with the Chicago Motor Coach company, and he joined 
CTA's Photographic section in November, 1972. His immediate 
plans call for taking care of chores at home, and he and his wife 
also plan to travel. 




10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Retirements 



Bernard P. Kane 

Bernard P. Kane, 58, supervisor, CTA 
General Accounting at the Merchandise 
Mart, bids adieu to co-workers after 39 
years of service. Kane received a lounge 
chair as a gift from his fellow workers. 
Celebrating with the retiree are (from left) 
Chuchai Gosrisirikul, Egidio Bevacqua, 
Rita Deakin, John Billis, Kane, Alexander 
Olsansky, and t\/lichael Cikara. 




Maurice Murphy District Superintendent Ludwig 
Scheuerle offers congratualtions and 
best wishes to Maurice Murphy (right), who retired January 1 as a 
supervisor in the South Rail district. Murphy began his 31-year 
CTA career in 1950, and has been a supervisor for the last 20 
years. He and his wife, Joan, have five sons, a daughter, and eight 
grandchildren, and plan to spend his retirement In their 
southwest side home and take short vacation trips. 



Joseoh Stuntofel Bus controller Joseph Stumpfel (left), 
' ' 58, accepts a gift certificate pre- 

sented to him upon his retirement by Area Superintendent Lester 
Racker. Co-workers, pensioners and special guests feted the 
35-year employee with an open house last month in the CTA Con- 
trol Center. His retirement was effective January 1. 




Alfred Deering 

Alfred Deering, 63, receives a retirement 
folder from Bus Shops Superintendent 
Frank Venezia after 31 years of service. 
On hand for the presentation last month 
were Alfred Haas (left), unit supervisor, 
and Al Zielinski (right), foreman. 



JANUARY, 1982 



Retirements 



Raymond Catanese 

A farewell handshake and best wishes are 
extended to Raymond Catanese, 62 
(right), at Desplaines terminal by shop 
foreman John Antonnucci as Catanese, a 
car repairman, retires after 40 years of 
CTA service. Lining up to also bid him 
adieu are (from left) Tom Wolgemuth, 
manager. Maintenance; Michael N. 
Horowitz, General External Affairs 
Manager, and Harold H. Geissenhelmer, 
General Operations Manager. Others are 
Mike DeCore, combination' clerk, and Cor- 
dell Surrett, unit supervisor. Catanese will 
maintain his Chicago home, and plans to 
pursue hobbies of cooking and TV and 
electrical repair. He also expects to do 
some traveling. 



George Kwiatkowski 

Jerry Walter (left), acting unit supervisor 
of the Engine Rebuild shop at South 
Shops, presents a retirement folder to 
George Kwiatkowski, 62, sheet metal 
worker. On hand to extend best wishes are 
(from left), co-workers Ed Oleksy, Louis 
Alleva, John Dopak, shop foreman, and 
Charlie Henderson. 



Bill Mobley 

Bill Mobley, 63, transportation clerk 
assigned to the general office In the Mer- 
chandise Mart since November 1972, gets 
a big hug from his granddaughter, Lenore 
Mozur, upon his retirement. Mobley began 
his public transit career with the Chicago 
Surface Lines in March, 1946, as a con- 
ductor. Other family members on hand as 
he brought 35 years of service to a close 
were (from left) grandson Eddy, his 
daughter, Mrs. Patricia Mozur, and grand- 
daughter Debbie. Mobley was honored by 
co-workers at an open house, and was 
presented with a monetary gift. 



Thomas O'Connor 

Thomas O'Connor (plaid shirt), bus repair- 
man at Lawndale garage, joins the list of 
CTA employees taking pensions January 
1. O'Connor's transit career spans 36 
years of service. Presenting the retirement 
folder is Acting Superintendent Clark 
Carter. Others on hand for the occasion 
are Bill Toomey (left), day foreman, and 
Louis Bauch, day assistant foreman. 




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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



JOINING THE ranks of the retired on Jan. 1 were the 1 2 employees pictured here who had 
more than 40 years of service each with CTA and its predecessor companies. 




William Henderson 
46 years 



Robert Hodgetts 
41 years 




Robert Johnson 
41 years 



Anthony Salkas 
40 years 



William Fox 
41 years 



Stanley Zielinski 
41 years 



Marvin Hildbold 
40 years 



James McCoy 
40 years 




Ted Nadrowski 
40 years 



JOHN BAJIC. Tinner, 

West Shops, Emp, 8-27-42 
JAMES BAKER, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp, 5-25-50 
JOHN BARBER, Supervisor, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 3-10-50 
ERIC BLAKELY, Photographer, 

Photographic, 6-16-48 
ALBERT BROWN, Operator, 

52nd Street, Emp 8-27-53 



AUBREY BROWN, Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 5-15-52 
HAROLD BROWN, Asst.Compt, Operations, 

Financial Services, Emp, 8-17-36 
JAMES BYRNE, Foreman A, 

Archer, Emp. 10-22-47 
DOUGLAS CAMPBELL, Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 8-19-52 
RAYMOND CATANESE, Car Repairman B, 

Desplaines, Emp. 1-13-42 
RAYMOND CHERNAK, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 12-3-53 
RUDOLPH CHUCAN, Shopman I, 

Skokie Shops, Emp. 10-3-45 
STANLEY CHUDOBA, Bus & Truck Mech., 

South Shops, Emp. 8-4-48 
ALLEN COOPER, Bus Repairer, 

Beverly, Emp, 6-23-52 
FRANK CORBETT, Sr. Schedule Clerk II, 

Schedules, Emp. 10-25-45 
JAMES COUGHLIN, Assistant Foreman, 

North Park, Emp. 9-25-41 
CALVIN COURSEY, Substation Utility Man, 

West Shops, Emp. 5-15-51 
MATTHEW COYLE, Supt.,Rail Veh.Term., 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 2-22-50 
RUPERT CRABB, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 10-30-58 



JOHN CRAIG, Instructor. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 12-9-42 
MARTIN DALEY, Material Dispatcher II, 

West Shops, Emp. 11-3-48 
ALFRED DEERING, Carpenter Leader. 

South Shops, Emp. 10-17-49 
JOSEPH DeMARCO, Machinist, 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 1-19-46 
ANTHONY DeMAYO, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 5-28-46 
ROBERT DENTON, Bus Repairer, 

South Shops, Emp. 7-7-51 
RICHARD DICKERSON, Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp. 2-2-46 
CLARENCE DOUGAN, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 6-25-46 
THADDEUS DRAG, Automotive Instructor, 

Limits, Emp. 10-22-47 
STEVE DUDASIK, Conductor, 

Forest Park, Emp. 2-1-47 
CLYDE EWING, Box Puller, 

North Avenue, Emp. 9-6-51 
JOSEPH FABITS Sr , Electrical Worker, 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 6-17-47 
JOHN FILARSKI, Bus Cleaner, 

North Park, Emp. 9-13-50 

(continued on page 14) 



JANUARY, 1982 



STEVE FLOREK. Bus Repairer, 

Archer, Emp. 3-21-47 
WILLIAM FOX, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp, 6-5-40 
JOSEPH FRANCHI, Bus & Trek Spcialst.. 

South Shops, Emp 6-8-46 
JOHN GAMPERL, Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 10-3-45 
JOHN GARDNER, Operator, 

Archer. Emp. 11-6-51 
JOHN GAVIN. Bus Repairer, 

Beverly, Emp. 10-31-51 
HENRY GERALI, Night Foreman A. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 6-25-46 
TANZEL GOVAN, Operator, 

52nd Street, Emp. 8-7-45 
FRANK GRAY, Box Puller. 

Archer. Emp. 10-10-42 
FRANCIS GRIFFIN. Substation Attendant, 

West Shops, Emp. 1-30-47 
GEORGE HATCHETT. Asst Superintendent. 

District B. Emp 2-4-46 
WELLINGTON HENDERSON. Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 12-4-51 
WILLIAM HENDERSON. Chief Clerk. 

Archer. Emp 1-5-35 
MARVIN HILDBOLD. Rail Supervisor. 

North Rail District. Emp. 12-4-41 
ROBERT HODGETTS. Construction Spcialst. 

Engineering. Emp. 5-16-40 
JOHN HOFFMAN. Traffic Checker, 

Schedules. Emp, 5-15-59 
LLOYD JACKSON. Instructor, 

Forest Glen. Emp. 6-7-48 
SAM JAVORSKI. Shopman I, 

Skokie Shop. Emp, 9-12-42 
EDWARD JOHNSON, Supervisor, 

Archer, Emp 8-2-51 
HOWARD JOHNSON, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-30-47 1 
JANE JOHNSON, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 7-9-66 
ROBERT JOHNSON, Bus Repairer, 

North Park, Emp. 10-17-40 
VICTOR JOHNSON Sr., Superintendent, 

North Park, Emp. 9-4-47 
EARL JONES Sr., Rail Clerk, 

63rd/Ashland. Emp. 1-17-49 
HOWARD JOSETTI, Collector. 

Limits. Emp 11-5-45 
CASIMIR JOZEFIAK. Painter, 

Skokie Shop, Emp 8-6-51 
BERNARD KANE. Supervisor. Gen. Acctg., 

Financial Services, Emp. 2-12-42 
RICHARD KARST, Personnel Investigator, 

Blue Island. Emp. 3-5-42 
JOHN KIPPES. Operator. 

North Park. Emp. 5-22-46 
FRANK KLINEC. Machinist, 

Skokie Shop. Emp 9-23-46 
EDWARD KORBUS. Box Puller, 

Archer. Emp 5-8-46 
JOSEPH KOVARIK. Asst Sheet Mtl Foreman. 

West Shops, Emp. 7-8-38 
CHARLES KROENER, Bus & Truck Mech , 

South Shops, Emp. 3-9-72 
RICHARD KUCHENNY. Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 9-27-43 
RAYMOND KURA, Bus & Truck Mechanic, 

South Shops. Emp 7-25-43 
GEORGE KWIATKOWSKI. Sheet Mtl Wkr , 

South Shops. Emp. 3-29-78 
EARL LARSEN, Project Analyst. 

Maintenance. Emp 8-12-37 
ALFONSAS LAURAS. Car Repairman B. 

Racine Terminal. Emp 6-6-51 



WILLIAM LAVIN. Police Liaison Detective. 

Blue Island. Emp. 8-29-77 
ELMER LAXSTROM. Shop Tractor Operator, 

South Shops. Emp 2-4-47 
JOHN LEAHY. Controller. 

Control Center, Emp, 3-12-46 
FRANCIS LeGUIRE, Supervisor, 

77th Street, Emp, 1-31-46 
EDWARD LEVANDOWSKI, Supt., Central 

Counting, 77th Street, Emp. 1-13-50 
WILLIE LEWIS, Car Repairman A, 

61st Street, Emp. 7-5-51 
FRANK LIPINSKI, Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp, 2-25-46 
ARTHUR LUBKE. Clerk. 

Archer. Emp. 5-19-48 
EDWARD MALINOWSKI, Supervisor, 

77th Street. Emp. 8-15-49 
ROBERT McCABE, Bus Repairer. 

North Avenue, Emp. 1-13-44 
JAMES McCOY, Real Estate Inspector 111. 

Law/Real Estate. Emp. 2-3-41 
ROBERT McELROY. Police Lieutenant, 

Blue Island, Emp. 11-29-61 
THOMAS McKEON, Supervisory Chauffeur, 

West Shops, Emp. 6-26-51 
MARTIN McMAHON, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 8-27-47 
ORLANDO MENICUCCI, Chief Clerk, 

Howard, Emp. 4-8-46 
CARL MICHALKO, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-28-51 
WILLIAM MOBLEY, Clerk, 

Transportation, Emp. 3-19-46 
JOHN MOLLOY, Terminal Foreman A, 

54th Shop. Emp. 8-30-49 
GEORGE MORRELL. Bus & Truck Mech., 

South Shops. Emp. 7-17-47 
FREDERICK MOSS. Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 5-3-46 
MAURICE MURPHY, Rail Supervisor. 

Rail District South, Emp. 2-24-50 
TED NADROWSKI, Lineman. 

West Shops. Emp. 6-11-41 
MICHAEL NOWACZYK. Claims Rep , 

Law/Claims, Emp. 10-1-49 
JOHN NYMAN. Operator. 

69th Street. Emp, 7-8-54 
THOMAS O'CONNOR. Bus Repairer, 

Lawndale, Emp. 1-28-45 
MAURICE O'DONNELL. Instructor, 

69th Street. Emp. 4-22-47 
KEVIN O'FLAHERTY, Conductor. 

Forest Park. Emp. 4-19-49 
STERLING O'NAN. Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 1-22-46 
ALFONSO PARRILLO, Bus Repairer, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-12-51 
FRED PATHEIGER, Instructor, 

69th Street, Emp. 9-10-46 
BRYANT PAXTON. Shopman. 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 2-5-51 
TOMMIE PERTEE. Car Repairman A, 

Racine Terminal. Emp. 6-15-51 
ADAM PODRASKY, Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 8-12-54 
MAURICE POWE, Rail Janitor. 

Maintenance. Emp 5-26-55 
WILLIAM RAFFERTY. Bus & Trck.Frmn,, 

South Shops. Emp 2-25-45 
DONALD RIESS. Interviewer. 

Employment-Placement. Emp. 1-5-39 
HENRY RINGO. Operator. 

Beverly. Emp. 11-2-42 
EARL RODGERS. Bus Repairer, 

Forest Glen. Emp. 12-13-45 



ROBERT ROOK. Operator, 

Forest Glen. Emp. 8-15-57 
CHESTER RUSAKIEWICZ. Design 

Drftsmn.. Engineering. Emp. 8-25-48 
DONALD St. JOHN. Srvc. Truck Chauffeur, 

West Shops. Emp. 7-8-46 
ANTHONY SALKAS. Electrical Worker. 

South Shops. Emp. 10-9-41 
ALBERT SAMASKA. Electrl.Maint. Man. 

South Shops. Emp. 2-1-43 
CHARLES SEMON, Signal Maintainer, 

West Shops. Emp. 1-9-46 
DANIEL SERRITELLA. Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 8-12-46 
VINCENT SHAYER, Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 1-27-48 
EDMUND SMOLINSKl, Bus Servicer, 

69th Street, Emp. 8-17-48 
JANINE SNYDER, Statistician, 

Safety, Emp. 3-9-59 
FRANK SPITALLl, Srvc. Trek. Chauffeur, 

West Shops, Emp. 4-27-46 
EDWARD SPRINGER. Operator. 

North Park. Emp. 5-2-50 
OSWALD STAMPLEY. Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 8-14-58 
RUSSELL STROHACKER. Supervisor. 

Archer. Emp. 4-22-46 
JOSEPH STUMPFEL. Controller, 

Control Center, Emp 10-22-46 
AARON SWOOPE, Day Foreman, 

98th Street Terminal, Emp. 8-3-45 
MATHEW SZAREK. Srvc, Trek. Chauffeur, 

West Shops, Emp. 5-29-46 
ARTHUR TABEL, Superintendent, 

North Avenue, Emp. 1-23-46 
RALPH TANNHAUSER, Lineman. 

West Shops. Emp. 1-5-48 
EDGAR TASHER. Operator, 

52nd Street. Emp. 1-15-42 
RAYMOND TREZISE. Asst. Supt., 

69th Street. Emp. 11-25-45 
ANTHONY TUCCY, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 10-1-42 
PHILIP TULLY, Clerk, 

North Park. Emp. 5-13-52 
JOSEPH ULASY. Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 8-1-57 
CHESTER URBAN, Schedule Maker. 

Schedules, Emp, 5-15-51 
WILLIAM WALTER, Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 7-29-54 
EDWARD WESTON, Asst. Supt., 

Forest Glen, Emp. 12-11-50 
JOHN WHITE, Superintendent, 

59th Street. Emp. 8-15-47 
THADDEUS WOJCIAK. Operator. 

Archer. Emp. 11-19-45 
THOMAS YAPELLI. Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp, 9-20-44 
JOSEPH ZALUD, Substation Attendant. 

West Shops. Emp. 8-20-45 
ROCCO ZAZZARA. Director, Legal 
Investigations, Law/Claims, Emp. 4-28-47 
STANLEY ZIELINSKI. Conductor. 

63rd/ Ashland, Emp. 12-18-40 



DISABILfTY RETIREMENTS 

CHARLES BROWN, Mailman, 

Administrative Services, Emp, 7-31-67 

AUGUSTA CAMPBELL, Operator, 
North Avenue, Emp 8-1-66 

ROBERT HARDY, Trackman II, 
West Shops, Emp 6-19-51 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



irsT nN/fl:E!nN/fl:oi^i.A.3vc 


NATHAN ABRAMS, 88, 77th Street, 


FAUSTINO MANDARINO, 76, Maint., 


Emp. 9-23-25, Died 11-11-81 


Emp. 9-24-25, Died 11-11-81 


EDWARD AUGUSTINE, 59, South Shops, 


MATTHEW MASCARl, 74, Skokie Shop, 


Emp. 9-3-47, Died 11-21-81 - 


Emp, 6-12-40, Died 11-11-81 


RENE BIARD, 67, Forest Glen, 


EUGENE MORIN, 82, North Park, 


Emp. 11-6-42, Died 11-15-81 


Emp. 4-2-24, Died 11-11-81 


ALBERT BOLLINGER, 78, Forest Glen, 


THOMAS NORGAARD, 96, Cottage Grove, 


Emp. 11-2-28, Died 11-7-81 


Emp. 7-26-16, Died 11-19-81 


NELL BRICK, 93, North Section, 


DANIEL O'BOYLE, 77, Kedzie, 


Emp. 8-5-46, Died 11-28-81 


Emp. 7-8-43, Died 11-22-81 


AXEL CARLSON, 87, 77th Street, 


HENRY QUINN, 84, 77th Street, 


Emp. 2-18-19, Died 10-9-81 


Emp. 5-7-26, Died 11-5-81 


JOHN CHLEVENKO, 86, 77th Street, 


JEROME ROCHETTE, 40, Forest Glen, 


Emp. 7-5-44, Died 11-6-81 


Emp. 3-22-67, Died 11-21-81 


MICHAEL DAILEY, 24, Maintenance, 


HUGO RUEDIGER, 83, Kimball, 


Emp. 8-4-78, Died 11-23-81 


Emp. 9-12-46, Died 11-19-81 


JOSEPH DAUGIRD, 61, Forest Glen, 


THOMAS SATKUS, 63, Beverly, 


Emp. 5-25-46, Died 11-27-81 


Emp. 1-28-47, Died 11-29-81 


WILLIE DUREN, 56, Transportation, 


ERNEST SCHUSTER, 83, Transportation, 


Emp. 12-31-47, Died 11-9-81 


Emp. 12-7-42, Died 8-13-81 


LAWRENCE HELINSKI, 74, 69th Street, 


GASPARE STABILE, 60, Maintenance, 


Emp. 1-20-43, Died 11-21-81 


Emp. 7-3-68, Died 11-11-81 


ANTHONY HENERY, 91, 77th Street, 


PETER SZAFRANSKI, 56, Archer, 


Emp. 2-19-23, Died 11-17-81 


Emp. 5-9-47, Died 11-29-81 


WILLIAM HOLLAND, 66, South Shops, 


ROBERT WALKER, 87, Stores, 


Emp. 12-1-48, Died 11-10-81 


Emp. 11-6-29, Died 11-5-81 


PETER HUGHES, 89, Shops & Equipment, 


CHARLES WELLS, 45, Limits, 


Emp. 8-14-43, Died 11-2-81 


Emp. 4-3-67, Died 11-14-81 


THOMAS HURLEY, 74, North Section, 


MATTHEW WILLIAMS, 59, South Section, 


Emp. 3-17-37, Died 11-4-81 


Emp. 10-10-57, Died 12-2-81 


EDWIN KNIAZ, 65, Skokie Shop, 


EDWARD WOLSKI, 77, District D, 


Emp. 12-8-39, Died 11-3-81 


Emp. 1-12-37, Died 11-2-81 


PAYTON LEWIS, 34, Lawndale, 


WALTER YOCIUS, 76, Electrical, 


Emp. 12-21-70, Died 11-27-81 


Emp. 8-15-23, Died 11-13-81 



Service anniversaries in January 



40 
years 



James Moone 

Archer 




30 years 



Williann Benuzzi, Lawndale 
Mary Berry, Treasury 
Willie Jackson, Lawndale 
Albert Jacques, North Ave. 
Everett Odle, Forest Glen 
Allen Smith, 77th Street 
James Spragges, Lawndale 



35 years 



Howard Andler, North Park 
Paul Christino, Executive 
Anthony Citro, Harlem 
Harold Friedl, Claims 
Oswald Grigalunas, Maint. 
Arthur Johnson, Rail Service 
Virgil Kruse, Electrical 
Matthew Kuzniar, Maint. 
Stanley Shimkus, So. Shops 
Eugene Sprovieri, Utility 



25 years 



Aaron Amos, North Avenue 
Darden Fuller, Rail Service 
Lutenant Hare, Utility 
Edgar Fuller, Forest Glen 
Leroy Nutall, Maintenance 
Edward Rivers, Archer 



Vi Robinson, 77th Street 
OUie Sanders, Limits 
Edward Scott, Maintenance 
Frank Steen Jr., 61st Street 
Thomas Walker, Electrical 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Volume 35 



Number 1 



Published for employees and retirees of the CTA by 
the External Affairs Division, Michael N. Horowitz, 
Manager. 

Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Senlces Department. 

Distributed tree of charge to all active and retired 
OTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



JANUARY, 1982 



15 



Notice to subscribers! 

Due to our rising publication and mailing costs, the new subscription 
rate for Transit News, effective January 1, 1982, will be $5.00 

for a one-year subscription. Subscriptions purchased prior to January 1, 
1982, will remain in force until their expiration date in 1982. We 
appreciate your continued interest in our publication and Chicago 
Transit Authority. 

CTA Transit News 
Publications Section 
Public Affairs Department 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILU. 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 
Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern- University .'Library 
Evanston, IL 60201' 



.=aL 



'^JAS.^:^ W^T(^-^H-\ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

(Please mark one space in each line) 

Who reads your Transit News? 

198 Me Only 208 Entire Family 

a b 

I save back Issues of Transit News: 
18 For Reference 95 For Personal Interest 



■^ 



67 Family & Friends 



For Reference & 
142 Personal Interest 



I would like to see Transit News published: 

322 Monthly As Is 121 Every Two Months With More Pages 

8 b 

SUBJECT PREFERENCE 

Which stories In Transit News are most Important to you? 

(Please rate on a scale of 4 to 1 : 4 ■ Very important; 3 ■ Important; 2 - Least Important; 1 • Not Interested; mark only 

one space In each line) 



INDIVIDUAL ANSWERS POINTS RANKING 



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EMPLOYEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

(Work Related) 
Special Features About Individual Acts of Heroism or Job Performance 
Commendation Comer 
Commendation Listing 
Promotions/Job Changes 
Suggestion Awards 
Day In CTA 
Public Safety Awards 
Maintenance Safety Awards 

EMPLOYEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

(Non-Work Related) 

(Please rate on a scale of 4 to 1 : 4 ■ Very Important; 3 - Important; 2 ■ Least Important; 1 ■ Not Interested; mark only 

one space in each line) 

CTA Sports Program 

Hobbles/Arts & Crafts 

Community Service Work 

Fratemal, Business, Academic, and Non-CTA Sports Accomplishments 

and Honors 

Retirement Parties 

Holiday Parties and Group Outlngs/Actlvltles 

Weddings & Births 

GENERAL SUBJECTS 

(Please rate on a scale of 4 to 1 : 4 ■ Very Important; 3 - Important; 2 ■ Least Important; 1 ■ Not Interested; mark only 

one space in each line) 

Statements From Management Conceming Current Events 

Budget and Finance Reports 

Major Facility and Equipment Improvements (Stations, Garages, 

Shops, Vehicles, etc.) 

Major Technical Improvements 

CTA Departments-What They Do and What They Have Accomplished 

CTA Participation In Major Events (ChlcagoFest, Movie Filming, etc.) 

CTA Community Involvement 

Employee Benefits and Insurance 

Transit History 

ADDITIONAL ITEMS THAT I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IN TRANSIT NEWS: 

117 Cooking/Recipes 
182 Household Tips 
247 Medical Advice 
32-) Legal Advice 
240 Energy Saving Tips 



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144 


1156 


22 


87 


150 


149 


110 


1206 


19 


87 


174 


122 


96 


1210 


18 


82 


146 


132 


128 


1158 


21 


88 


181 


130 


92 


1247 


15 


90 


140 


158 


103 


1199 


20 


56 


116 


185 


131 


1073 


24 



4 


3 


2 


1 






268 


139 


32 


55 


1608 


3 


226 


157 


60 


54 


1549 


6 


208 


193 


56 


36 


1559 


5 


202 


184 


57 


36 


1510 


7 


254 


166 


45 


32 


1636 


2 


141 


188 


109 


56 


1402 


10 


141 


171 


105 


70 


1357 


12 


307 


124 


35 


28 


1698 


1 


188 


169 


81 


56 


1477 


9 



The Publications staff would like to thank everyone who 
responded to our TRANSIT NEWS SURVEY. Data processing 
of the surveys has now been completed, and we will use the 
results as a guide to planning future issues of Transit News. 

The surveys have been evaluated from two points of 
view. The first is a quantitative evaluation of the answers 
marked on the survey form, as shown in the above illustra- 
tion. In most cases, the numbers do not add up to the same 
total because many surveys contained blank responses for 
some of the questions. 

Of the 523 surveys received, 20 surveys had comments 
without answers. Although those 20 surveys were not in- 
cluded in the data processing input, all comments were 
noted, and they will be reported later in this article. 



General information 

The answers in this section indicate that 59 per cent of 
those who responded share Transit News with their family 
or friends, and that 52 per cent have saved issues for 
reference or personal interest. Also, more than 72 per cent 
would prefer that Transit News remain a monthly publica- 
tion, rather than a larger bi-monthly publication. 

(Continued on page 2) 



BasissMssm 




FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

MARCH, 1982 



Heroes 
honored 

Friendship, good luck, and a shared 
concern for the welfare of CTA riders 
led Bus Operators Willie Smith and 
Fred Williams Jr., both from 69th 
Street garage, to retrieve a purse and 
win the lasting gratitude of Helen 
Markov, of South Artesian Avenue. 

Ms. Markov, who suffers from ar- 
thritis and uses a cane, was waiting 
one wintry noontime at 69th Street for 
a northbound bus on Ashland. 

Williams, who is also a pool Super- 
visor and pool Special Services 
Operator, was pulling up in an 
Ashland bus when he saw a man tug- 
ging at Ms. Markov's handbag. 

As soon as he was able to turn his 
bus over to his relief, Williams began 
chasing the purse-snatcher, who by 
this time had run off with the bag. 
While running east on 69th Street, 
Williams was noticed by Smith, who 
was off duty in his car heading the 
other way. 

Williams jumped into his friend's 
car, and together they pursued the of- 




Bus Operators Willie Smith (left) and Fred Williams Jr. are thanked at 69th Street garage 
by Acting Superintendent David Hinman for their role in chasing a purse-snatcher and 
recovering intact an elderly rider's possessions. 



fender. After confronting him in an 
alley, they retrieved the purse, which 
had not yet been opened. 

In her letter of commendation to 
Mayor Byrne, Ms. Markov said, "1 was 
hysterical, yelling for the police, and 
with my cane 1 started after him, 



hollering, 'He's got my purse!' 

"People on 69th Street called the 
police, but 1 was too emotionally upset 
to talk to them, and started for home. 
When 1 got to Ashland, I heard these 
two CTA men calling me. They had 
my bag! 



Transit News Survey 

(Continued from page 1) 

Subject preference 

In this section of the survey, the answers provide a 
valuable critique of the types of stories that have appeared in 
Transit News over the last three years, by indicating reader 
interest in the various editorial categories. 

The numbers in the illustration show how many times 
each answer appeared on all the surveys. The numbers in 
each column were multiplied by the number (4, 3, 2, or 1) at 
the top of the column, and then added across. The result 
was a point value ("POINTS" column), which indicated 
cumulative reader interest in each category. The "RANKING" 
column, based on "POINTS," indicates the relative impor- 
tance of each type of story to our readers, and will be used 
to determine editorial content and space allocation of future 
magazines. 

Thus the top six categories in reader preference are: 
Employee Benefits and insurance; CTA Departments-- 
What They Do and What They Have Accomplished; 
Statements From Management Concerning Current Events; 
Features About Individual Acts of Heroism or Job Per- 
formance; Major Facility and Equipment Improvements; 
Budget and Finance Reports. 

We are currently working with Insurance and Pensions to 
establish a periodic column about benefits and insurance. 

Mr. Cardilli's new column. From the Chairman, is the first 
step in bringing significant management comment to Transit 
News, and we will explore other types of management com- 
ment in the future. 

Accomplishments of CTA departments, acts of heroism 
and job performance, and facility and equipment im- 
provements have often been reported in Transit News, and 
we would like to continue and expand this type of coverage. 
Reader input is most important in this area. We ask that 



employees suggest story ideas by phone or by mail, and we 
will make the necessary arrangements to have a writer and 
photographer cover the story. 

We have not yet explored budget and finance reporting 
for Transit News, but we plan to do so in the future. 

Additional items 

The last part of the statistical data of the survey suggested 
five editorial subjects that might be added to Transit News. 
This section received responses from 389 people, with most 
indicating more than one response. 

We have recently made inquiries of the Chicago Bar 
Association, the Illinois Bar Association, and the American 
Medical Association for assistance in producing legal and 
medical advice columns. Other additional items may be 
added in the future. 

Transit News is very grateful to the Data Processing 
department, especially Phil Salomone and Marlene Trock, 
for their advice and cooperation. Salomone, Supervisor, In- 
formation Services, developed the data entry process for 
collecting the survey information. Trock, Principal Applica- 
tions Designer, performed the analysis of the data by using 
the Statistical Analysis Package (SAS), based on the 
responses received from the survey. 

Comments 

Of the 523 surveys received, 225 elicited responses in the 
"COMMENTS" section at the bottom. Once again, the 
breakdown of comments does not add up because many of 
the comments refer to more than one subject. This 
breakdown is as follows: 
37 - compliments 
32 - stop publishing 
26 - criticized lateness of distribution 
17 - unrelated comments or suggestions about CTA 
118 - editorial comments and suggestions 
We appreciate your compliments very much, and we 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Conductor Harvey Cowins (left) is congratulated by William Rooney, Assistant Station 
Superintendent, Kimball, for his part in preventing the mugging of three riders on a 
Ravenswood train with the help of Motorman Levi Wardell (right). 



"I couldn't believe it. I was so grateful. 
All my money, keys, driver's license, 
and other ID's, plus my watch, ring and 
bracelet, everything was intact! 

"I never thought I would see my 
belongings again. A few days later I 
went to the CTA in the Merchandise 



Mart and gave them a report." 

Quick action by the crew of a 
Ravenswood train one Saturday after- 
noon prevented the mugging of three 
women passengers, who were ac- 
costed by four males apparently work- 
ing together. 



North Section Conductor Harvey 
Cowins recognized the "set-up" as two 
of the offenders cornered one of the 
would-be victims when she got up to 
leave at Wellington. At the same time, 
the other two men tried to grab the 
purses of the other women who were 
still seated. 

Cowins signaled Motorman Levi 
Wardell, who charged out of his cab 
while Cowins confronted the two 
muggers at the door. They ordered 
one of the men at the door to return 
the lady's wallet and told all four 
troublemakers to get off the train im- 
mediately — which they did. 

One of the would-be victims, 
Virginia Hoffman, of Western Springs, 
wrote, "I believe the two men, who 
work on train *414, deserve whatever 
is appropriate for protecting 
passengers on the CTA. They had no 
weapons, and used their common 
sense and muscle to stand up to the 
others. Hooray! 

"The three women who were in the 
car were thus protected. Please relay 
this information to the appropriate 
people so that these workers can be 
rewarded." 



hope to make our magazine more relevant, interesting, and 
enjoyable in the future. 

Although most of the people who suggested that we stop 
publishing cited economic reasons, management considers 
Transit News an important means of communicating with 
employees. We have economized by distributing the 
magazine through Utility bulk delivery to field locations and 
Mail Room delivery in the Mart, which is much less expen- 
sive than sending the magazine to employees' homes 
through the U.S. Postal Service. We also no longer request 
returns by the Postal Service of magazines that could not be 
delivered to retirees and subscribers. 

Lateness of distribution is a two-fold problem. To insure 
accuracy in our changing economic and organizational en- 
vironment, the editorial content of the magazine must now 
be more thoroughly researched and reviewed, which is 
more time consuming. 

Transit News, as a publication for employees and retirees, 
must also have a lower printing priority than revenue- 
producing materials, rider information materials, or training 
materials. So production of Transit News has been delayed 
by production of monthly passes, "Ban the Buck" or service 
change window card and flyer production, or other 
emergency requirements. 

We are currently resolving these problem areas, and we 
are certain that more efficient production scheduling and in- 
house delivery will result in more timely and regular distribu- 
tion. 

Unrelated comments or suggestions about CTA will be 
forwarded to the appropriate departments. 

Editorial comments 

Comments about the editorial content of Transit News 
generally paralleled the results of the statistical part of the 
survey and have been categorized as follows: 

16 -- more about other jobs and departments, job re- 
quirements, and how the jobs are performed 



15 -- requested management comment on situations 

and problems or requested financial reporting 
15 -- more personal news, return to gossip column or 

"inside news" format 
11 -- more focus on field employees--less on Mart and 
management 
5 -- requested editorial involvement and submissions 

by employees and managers 
5 -- more information about CTA involvement in in- 
dustry associations, technical information, or 
railfan activity 
5 -- expand coverage of retirees' activities or death 

notices 
5 - criticized quality of writing, layout, and/or 

photography 
4 -- more information about pensions or employee 

welfare programs 
4 - more information about money saving or self 

help and self improvement programs 
2 - requested FOR SALE ads by employees 
2 - requested exposes of CTA scandals 
2 -- more union news 
27 -- miscellaneous 
The opinions expressed in these comments will also be 
considered as we plan the future of Transit News. 

We believe that it is an indication of the quality and dignity 
of CTA employees, that, even during these problematic 
times, only one of the comments received was considered 
abusive and in poor taste. 

The Publications staff will now move ahead and begin 
making changes that will tailor the magazine to meet your 
needs as indicated by the survey. We welcome your com- 
ments and story ideas. You may contact us between 8 a.m. 
and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at extension 
3320 in the Mart, or send your comment or story idea to 
CTA Transit News, Room 734, Merchandise Mart, via 
company mail. 



MARCH, 1982 



From 

the Chairman 



Work rules 




As public service employees, our salaries are paid by the 
people we serve, both directly through the fare box and in- 
directly through taxes. We are, therefore, accountable to the 
public to serve their transportation needs. 

We must provide conveniently-scheduled service that 
runs on schedule. We must treat the public with the same 
respect and courtesy that we would expect from people in 
other organizations who serve us. And our efficiency and 
economy of operation must demonstrate that we are spend- 
ing the public's money wisely. 

From our heritage of more than 120 years of public transit 
in Chicago, we have learned the techniques that assure 
these goals. These techniques are explained in detail as 



operating rules in the CTA General Rule Book and the 
various departmental rule books. 

It is the responsibility of all employees to be 
knowledgeable of and abide by these rules, and it is the 
responsibility of those of you in supervisory positions to in- 
sure that all rules are enforced. 

Supervisory employees within a large organization can 
sometimes lose full appreciation of the fact that their livelihood 
depends directly on the performance of their subordinates and 
the quality of work produced by their part of the organization. 
Perhaps the best way to judge your supervisory practices is to 
ask yourself what performance standards and disciplinary 
measures you would employ if you were operating your own 
small company and earning your livelihood directly from the 
products and services produced. 

Therefore, 1 direct all supervisory personnel to strictly en- 
force all general and departmental rules, all executive 
orders, all departmental bulletins, and all written and verbal 
instructions — including the application of appropriate 
disciplinary action where warranted. Areas of specific con- 
cern should be: completion of assignments and duties in the 
proper manner and within the required' time frame; 
adherence to work-hour schedules, including proper com- 
pliance with lunch and break periods; personal conduct on 
the job, and courtesy toward the public and other 
employees. 

Our operating rules have withstood the test of time and 
have been continually revised to meet the changing transit 
needs of Chicago. By diligently applying these rules, we will 
provide the people of Chicago with the quality of transporta- 
tion that they rightfully expect. 



Rail supervisor 
graduates 

Five rail service employees recently 
received Achievement Awards for 
completing the 14-week rail service 
supervisor training program. All train- 
ing was done on their off-duty time. 

Chairman Michael A. Cardilli con- 
gratulated the graduates in a 
ceremony in the CTA Board room. 

"I have a great respect for persons 
who want to be leaders," Cardilli told 
the graduates. "Leadership is a quality 
you have to strive to achieve. You 
have made your families, your super- 
visors, and myself proud of you." 

The five graduates attended the 
training in the CTA Training Center, 
2670 N. Clark Street, and at various 
field locations. 

Also present for the informal 
ceremony were Heirold Geissenheimer, 
General Operations Manager; Michael 
Horowitz, General External Affairs 
Manager; James Blaa, Transportation 
Manager; Michael LaVelle, Transporta- 
tion department Director of Service; Ed- 
ward Mitchell, Transportation depart- 
ment Director of Support Services, and 
Robert Desvignes, Area Superintend- 
ent, Instruction. 

Blaa and LaVelle presented the new 
supervisors their Achievement 
Awards. The recipients were: 




Recent rail supervisor training graduates are (from left) Chester KIdd, South Section, ex- 
tra board; Michael Handson, West Section, extra board; Helma Duniver, North Section, 
Conductor; Marco Cordova, North Section, Conductor, and Robert Prince, West Section, 
Motorman. 



Chester Kidd, South Section extra 
board, who said his training has 
motivated him to do his very best and 
he is working to become a future CTA 
chairman. 

Michael Handson, West Section 
extra board, who said he previously 
thought he knew a great deal about 
CTA rail operations. His 14 weeks of 
training taught him many intricate 
details that he could not have ap- 
preciated without such training. 

Helma Duniver. North Section 
Conductor, who said she was excited 
about the new challenges she faces as a 
supervisor. She said she plans to 
become the best supervisor in CTA. 



Marco Cordova, North Section 
Conductor, who expressed his ap- 
preciation to be able to advance 
himself with his training and to gain 
more understanding and responsibility 
of the operations of the rail system. 

Robert Prince, West Section Motor- 
man, who said the 14-week program 
was hard work and took a lot of dedica- 
tion, but every minute he spent on it was 
worth it and was most rewarding. 

The five graduates came from an 
original total of 100 applicants. 

They are assigned to the Transpor- 
tation department's rail supervisors 
pool and will be called from their cur- 
rent jobs as required. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



For i;our benefit 

Prompt application speeds 
temporary disability payments 



How does an employee who becomes ill or injured-off- 
duty make certain that he or she is paid properly? This ques- 
tion is a continuing problem for employees, their depart- 
ment managers, and the Insurance department. Confusion 
is most prevalent among new employees, but veteran 
employees occasionally forget the procedures and need 
some refresher training along these lines. The basic steps 
that must be followed to insure proper payment are as 
follows. 

Disability Notice 

An employee must file a Disability Notice (CTA Form 
7530) on the first day of absence as the result of illness or 
injury-off-duty. The form may be obtained from the clerk at 
the employee's work location, and it is advisable that every 
employee keep a copy of the form at home for use in the 
event of a house-confining illness or injury-off-duty. 

The Disability Notice is used for the processing and pay- 
ment of weekly disability payments, and is processed only 
within the Insurance department. The blue Hospital Notice 
of Claim form, which is sent directly to Travelers Insurance 
Company and is used as part of the process in the payment 
of hospital, medical, surgical, and major medical costs, does 
not substitute for a Disability Notice. 

Doctor's care 

An employee must be under a doctor's care to be eligible 
for weekly benefits. When completing the Disability Notice, 
in addition to filling in the pertinent information about 
himself or herself, the employee must also include the 
name, address, and telephone number of the treating physi- 
cian. If the employee fails to enter all of this information, the 
Insurance department assumes that the employee is not 
under a doctor's care, and therefore is not eligible for weekly 
indemnity payments. Proper preparation of the Disability 
Notice form will eliminate problems at a later date. 

Prompt filing 

The Disability Notice must be filled in and mailed to the 
Insurance department on the first day of illness or injury-off- 
duty, even though the employee expects to return to work 
the next day. In many instances employees who feel that 
they will return to work immediately do not, and late filing of 

Editor's note: The For your benefit column will become a frequent feature in Transit News. 



the Disability Notice causes problems for the employee and 
the Insurance department - - and it delays handling and pay- 
ment of claims. 

Medical documentation 

The preparation and forwarding of a Disability Notice is 
only the first part of the requirements that must be com- 
pleted before disability payments can begin. The employee 
must also provide medical documentation from a licensed 
physician stating: the nature of the disability resulting from 
illness or injury-off-duty; the date when the physician began 
treating the employee for the illness or injury-off-duty, and 
the estimated length of time that the employee will be absent 
from work due to the resulting disability. Disability payments 
only begin after an employee is under a doctor's care. 

Eligibility 

An employee is eligible to receive disability payments only 
after having been an active, full-time employee for at least 
one year, and only after the Disability Notice and medical 
documentation explained above have been satisfactorily 
completed and filed with the Insurance department. 

Returning to work 

When an employee returns to work after recovering from 
an illness or injury-off-duty, and has been absent more than 
seven calendar days, the employee must be approved by 
the CTA Medical department before being allowed to return 
to work. 

When the employee reports to his or her work location, a 
Return to Work form (CTA Form 7542) must be prepared 
by the employee's department, and forwarded to the In- 
surance department. This is true for employees in the field 
as well as General Office employees. If this is not done, the 
employee might continue to receive disability benefits after 
returning to work, which becomes a problem when the 
employee must refund the overpayment. 

Employees and their departments can avoid problems 
with their claims and expedite their payments by following 
the simple steps explained above. Employees and 
dependents having additional questions should telephone 
the Insurance department on ext. 3610 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. wekdays. 




Complete electrical training 

Several Skokie Shop employees were congratulated by 
their supervisors for having completed a 44-hour elec- 
trical training course which qualified them to fill in as 
acting maintenance electricians, if needed. Celebrating 
the course completion are (left to right): Richard 
Lorimer, Unit Supervisor, Unit Overhaul; Electrical 
Workers Duane Nieciecki and Kres Misetic; Training 
Specialist Charles Townsend, course Instructor; Elec- 
trical Workers Leslie Seitmen and William Hansen; 
Maintenance Electrician Lino Lupetini, and George 
Haenisch, Superintendent, Rail Vehicle Shop. Electrical 
Workers Edward Lubomski and Raymond Hagerty also 
completed the course, but were not available for the 
photo. 



MARCH, 1982 




Transportation Manager James Blaa congratulates Bus Operator Jean Cage who re- 
ceived 19 commendations and no complaints during 1981. 



John Cameron 
14 commendations 



Golden Rule 

earns commendations 

Applying the golden rule to the job was the most fre- 
quently implied philosophy of operating personnel who 
received special recognition in February from Transporta- 
tion management for commendations received from the 
riding public during 1981. 

Jean Cage, a Bus Operator at North Park garage who led 
28 other operating employees with 19 commendations for 
1981, expressed a view heard again and again from CTA's 
top honorees. "I learned from my grandmother a long time 
ago to treat people just as I'd like to be treated. I encourage 
my riders to put a little light in the day with a smile. I've 
found that it really makes for a pleasant day," said Cage. 

An Operator since 1979, Cage was cited last year by 
riders on the #36 Broadway bus route as an extraordinarily 
competent and dedicated employee who is quick to respond 
to people in need, and a person who keeps her eyes open to 
every situation. 

Transportation Manager James Blaa commended Cage 
for an outstanding job and presented her with a special 
"Funtastic 1982" coupon book containing more than 1,000 
discount tickets. The coupon books, which were provided 
by the Employee Welfare Fund, offer discounts on a variety 
of goods and services, from dry cleaning and automotive 
repairs to entertainment. 

Blaa and his staff presented "Funtastic 1982" coupon 
books to each employee honored in this initial effort of an- 
nual special recognition for operating personnel. All 
honorees had been consistently praised by the riding public 
without receiving a single complaint. 

Operator Willie L. James (North Park), who had 12 com- 
mendations last year, said, "People will respond to a warm 
greeting, or a caution to hold on, and to watch their step. 1 
have found that when you treat people nice, they will treat 



you the same way," said James, the father of two sons. 

Patricia L. Cobb (North Park), an Operator since 1977, 
received 1 1 commendations in 1981 . Her formula for pleas- 
ing riders includes a cheery greeting for every passenger. 
Ms. Cobb said she also extends a helping hand to her riders 
whenever possible. "I have a lot of seniors boarding my 
bus," said Cobb. "When they have difficulty boarding, or 
have packages, I'll help them board. After awhile, some of 
the passengers will also help the seniors. I try to keep things 
in my favor by treating the riders the way I'd like to be 
treated," she said. 

Giles Liddell (Limits), a Bus Operator since 1973, re- 
ceived 11 commendations in 1981. Liddell regales his 
Sheridan Road riders with a travelog treatment that includes 
bits of information about buildings, businesses, statues, 
museums, park areas, and the lake along his route. 

Rail Conductor John R. Cameron (South Section) re- 
ceived 14 commendations, the second most received for 
1981. Cameron not only calls each stop, but informs his 
riders of the connecting transfer lines, points of interest, the 
time, and the temperature. Riders frequently praise him for 
taking the extra measure to assure them convenience and 
comfort, and for his professional manner. 

"We have to communicate with people." said Cameron. 
"It saves time, and it helps us to get from one point to the 
next." His personal touch is the result of the kind of ques- 
tions asked by many of his riders, he said. 

Nathaniel Lee, another South Section Conductor praised 
by management, said the approach he and Cameron have 
adopted to serve the riding public is meant to provide riders 
with a sense of well being. Lee said he wanted to extend his 
personality into the job as much as possible by com- 
municating with his riders. 

Bus Operator Cleven Wardlow (Limits), the "Happy Bus 
Driver," recipient of nine commendations, said, "Show 
yourself friendly first. A kind word turns away wrath." 

Other operating personnel receiving "Funtastic 1982" 
books for their exemplary service in 1981 were: Zeke Jagst, 



CJA TRANSIT NEWS 




Willie James 

12 commendations 



Patricia Cobb 

11 commendations 



Giles Liddell 

11 commendations 



Robert Martinez, Joseph Zukerman, Arnold Beler, 
Madaline Martin, Dianna Owens, Tomas Cintron, James 
Jones and Mary Schmidtke, all of North Park garage. 

On the honoree list from Limits garage were Faye V. 
Murry and LeBlanc LeDree. Forest Glen garage was 
represented by Henderson Williams, Ricardo Leiva, and 



Adolph Marth. "Fantastic 1982" books also went to 
Lawndale Bus Operators Earl Miles and Orval Porter. 

Others were: John P. Zupko and Angelo M. Sturino, 
Kimball terminal; Edward C. Tribue, 61st Street terminal; 
Lura D. Minter, North Avenue garage; Billy R. Ragsdale, 
52nd Street garage, and Keith Griffin, 69th Street garage. 



Happy anniversary 

During a tour of the Control Center 
on February 25, General Operations 
Manager Harold H. Geissenheimer 
(from left). General External Affairs 
Manager Michael N. Horowitz, and 
CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
pause to congratulate Transportation 
Manager James R. Blaa on the occa- 
sion of his 4C)th anniversary of service 
to CTA and its predecessor com- 
panies. 

Blaa began his transportation career 
as a file clerk in the Transportation 
department of the Chicago Surface 
Lines on February 25, 1942. After 
returning from three years of military 
service during World War II, Blaa 
gained experience as a bus operator, 
motorman, one-man streetcar 
operator, and clerk at Cottage Grove 
car barn. He was appointed Assistant 
Superintendent, South Section, in 
1957; Superintendent, Lake-Logan 
Square, in 1960; Superintendent, 
Rapid Transit Operations, in 1964; 
and Manager, Transportation, in 
1974. 

The bus controller in the photo is 
James O'Connor. 




MARCH, 1982 




If-';' 



Si^> 



f ' 


* 1 isM, 


A' 


, i, 1 



Getting a look at the wheel truing machine are (from left) Manny 
Ortiz, Assistant Director, Chicago Board of Education; Eileen Cur- 
ran, Training Coordinator, Comissioner on Animal Control; Den- 
nis McAvoy, Director of Research, Economic Development 

'Mini-TI' hosts local officials 



Center^ Bernard Katz, Water Engineer, Water Department; Lillian 
Szabo, Director, Planning Division, Office for Senior Citizens. 
Their guide is Richard Lorimer, Rail Vehicle Shop Unit Supervisor. 



Thirty-two people participated in an 
abbreviated CTA Technical Institute 
March 4 to get an overview of 
Chicago's public transportation 
system. 

The mini-TI was on the agenda of 
activities in an on-going Executive 
Development Training Program being 
conducted by the City of Chicago Per- 
sonnel department in conjunction with 
the Chicago City Colleges. Par- 



ticipants represent various city and 
suburban agencies including CTA. 

Some of the program's objectives 
are to familiarize city employees with 
the operation of a variety of public and 
quasi-public agencies and depart- 
ments, and to give them the benefit of 
observing effective delivery of services 
through modern administrative and 
supervisory skills and techniques. 

Michael Horowitz, General External 



Affairs Manager, gave the group an 
executive perspective of the CTA, and 
an operations overview was presented 
by Harold H. Geissenheimer, General 
Operations Manager. A question and 
answer period followed, in which par- 
ticipants addressed issues on transpor- 
tation service. 

The group then toured the CTA 
Control Center, the State Street sub- 
way near ■ Harrison station, Howard 
terminal, and the Rail Vehicle 
Maintenance shop at Skokie. 





Above: George Haenisch, Superintendent, Rail Vehicle Shop, gives visitors a rundown on 
the Truck Shop. Guests are (from left) Dr. Edward Mazur, Program Coordinator, Chicago 
City Colleges (back ot camera); Frank McGehee, Director, Children and Youth Division, 
Department of Human Services; Stanley Sherr, Assistant to the Director, Department of 
Inspectional Services, and Mike Nardulli, CTA Human Resources department. 
Left: Terry Bernero, Electrical Worker at Skokie Shop, explains the Electrical Unit Rebuild 
to the mini-TI group. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





Ray Ruzich and his wife, Lorraine, show 
off their 8 pound, 3 ounce grandson, 
James Fredericit Feltz who was born 
February 4. The baby's father, Jim Feltz, is 
Charter Bus and Records Clerk at South 
Shops. Mrs. Feltz, the former Lynne 
Ruzich, was employed in the CTA Person- 
nel department. Proud grandfather 
Ruzich, a CTA employee for 43 years, 
retired August 1, 1979, as Supervisor of 
Placement and Interviewing Procedures. 
Archer garage Operator Ernie Feltz, also 
retired, and his wife, Fran, are the 
newcomer's paternal grandparents. 



Left: George Wylie, Blacksmith and 
Welder Foreman at Skokie Shop, explains 
refurbishing of trolley beam incasters on 
sleet scrapers done in the Blacksmith 
Shop at Skokie Shop. The group includes 
(from left) Arthur Thompson, Commander, 
Wentworth District, Chicago Police 
Department; Frank Malinowski, Chief Per- 
sonnel Analyst, Chicago Department of 
Personnel; Vern Odom, Assistant Direc- 
tor, Building and Zoning. 
Below left: Lester Racker, Area 
Superintendent, CTA Control Center, ex- 
plains how exact location of trains is 
charted. The group includes Dennis 
McAvoy, Bernard Katz, and Jay Moody, 
Assistant Commissioner, Department of 
Housing. Behind Racker is Mike LaVelle, 
CTA Transportation Director of Service. 



Stricter guidelines 
announced for 
organization 
memberships 

Budgetary constraints have been 
placed on company-paid member- 
ships in professional or industrial 
organizations for 1982. All requests 
for new memberships or renewal of 
existing memberships must be accom- 
panied by a letter of justification ap- 
proved by the employee's department 
manager. Guidelines for memberships 
are as follows: 

A CTA paid membership 
shall be of immediate or 
potential benefit to the CTA. 
A personal membership in an 
employee's primary profes- 
sional organization will be 
paid by the employee. 
Other personal membership 
to professional organizations 
may be paid if the publica- 
tions provided by the 
membership are needed by 
the CTA, or if it is considered 
desirable for CTA to have a 
specified person as a 
representative in the organ- 
ization involved. 
All memberships must be directed to 
the Library Services section, Manage- 
ment Services, Room 450, for pro- 
cessing and forwarding for final ap- 
proval. 



MARCH, 1982 




Jesus Erazo (North Park 
garage) was admired by 
Stella Dytko, of Cortez Street, 
who was a rider on his #11 
Lincoln bus. "He not only 
drove the bus with care, but 
at all times approached the 
curb so passengers getting 
on and off would not have to 
step onto heavy snow. He 
was also courteous in 
answering any questions put 
to him regarding directions, 
and which buses to take to 
reach a destination. The ride 
was very smooth. I sat across 
from the driver, so I was able 
to hear his directions. I was 
most impressed that he did 
not start up or stop with 
jerks." 



John Harris (Lawndale 
garage) was complimented 
by James Casella, an in- 
surance company represen- 
tative with offices on South 
Wacker Drive, for his han- 
dling of a #60 Blue Island/26 
bus. "Mr. Harris is truly a pro- 
fessional bus driver and a 
credit to CTA. One cannot ig- 
nore his courteous manner to 
riders. He operates his bus 
safely and, provides a good 
ride. He calls out each street 
stop with ample time for 
riders to depart the bus. I 
have been involved in 
automobile and fleet safety 
for over thirty years, and I can 
easily recognize professional 
driving performance." 




commendation corner 



Alan Carter (North Section) impressed Richard Willis, of 
North Harding Avenue, who was a rider on his 
Ravenswood train. "This conductor ensures that each 
passenger entering the train on Sundays at Belmont is 
aware that the train is northbound, not southbound. I 
believe he genuinely cares that passengers not be incon- 
venienced. There was a party of five people on the train 
who did not speak English, and he had to spend most of the 
trip to Kimball trying to communicate with them while 
operating the doors and dealing with other passengers. He 
was patient, friendly, and considerate." 

Joseph Smith (Limits garage) was commended by 
Alfred Stott, president of a research firm on West Grand 
Avenue, for his courtesy and skill as operator of a #156 
LaSalle bus. "I think your driver #3581 is worthy of praise. 
He is always cheerful and courteous to his riders, and willing 
to assist those seeking directions. He is very careful and 
cautious in handling the bus on wet, slippery streets. As I am 
in a mechanical type of business, I am always happy to see a 
person treat mechanical devices with care and respect. He 
treats his bus like it was his private property." 

Joe Nash (69th Street garage) was praised by Thomas 
O'Neill, of South Francisco Avenue, for his handling of a 
tense situation on a #49 Western bus. "Several young guys 
with hair picks and a knife were after some others on the 
bus. All the passengers started to move to the front of the 
bus to get off. This driver pushed his way to the middle of 
the bus, and after asking these guys what they were doing, 
he told them to leave the bus. They did get off. Because of 
the driver's care and concern for his passengers, what could 
have been a very serious incident ended up peacefully." 



Earl Carson (North Park garage) was appreciated by 
Ruth Wegat, of North Lake Shore Drive, for his "courtesy 
and helpfulness" while driving a #151 Sheridan bus. "He 
knew his streets, called them out, and was able to tell his 
passengers where to get off in order to reach their destina- 
tions. He answered at least ten questions between the time I 
got on at Schiller and when 1 got off at Jackson and Dear- 
born. He was also very well groomed and neatly dressed, as 
well as being pleasant and informed. The CTA needs more 
drivers like him." 

Jesse Stoudmire Jr. (North Section), conductor of a 
Howard train, was "an exemplary model for many to learn 
from," according to Virginia Rohde, of Winnetka. "He 
called all the stations clearly and added extra information. 1 
remember distinctly that for the Washington stop he men- 
tioned the bus stations and a few other destinations. He did 
this at other stations, too. This is very helpful to the traveling 
public, and especially strangers. I have lived in the area all 
my life, and have seen a wide variety of employees, some 
dedicated and some just being there." 

Giles Liddell Jr. (Limits garage) was thanked for the 
"pleasure" of riding his #151 Sheridan bus by Coralie 
Novotny, who works on North Michigan Avenue. "He 
regaled us with little bits of information about the buildings, 
businesses, Lake Michigan, statues, museums, and park 
areas we passed along his route. It was so nice to ride on a 
bus where the passengers were smiling, learning, and being 
amused by the statements the driver was making. We do ap- 
preciate it when we ride with pleasant and courteous 
drivers. It is nice to see drivers make an effort to make their 
passengers feel reassured and comfortable." 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Thanks - for a job well done 



Charles Bourgoyne, Beverly 
James Boyd, Limits 
Susan Brasewicz, Archer 
Kenneth Brown, Archer 
Ronald Brown, Limits 
John Brugess, Limits 
Chester Buchanan, North Park 

Albert Clark, 69th Street 
Emerson Coates, Limits 
Tyree Cobb Jr., Limits 
Oscar Coleman, 77th Street 
Claude Conwell, 69th Street 
Marvin Covington, Limits 
Cedric Crosbie, Beverly 

Johnny Dickerson, North Avenue 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 

Hubert Fincher, North Park 
Harmon Fisher, North Avenue 
Reginald Freeman, Rail Instruction 

Juan Gonzalez, North Park 
Roldan Gonzalez, North Section 

Ronald Hargrave, North Park 
Raymond Howard, Archer 



Tomie Jackson, North Avenue 
Perry Jackson Jr., 69th Street 
Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Willie James, North Park 
James Jeffries, Limits 
Gersham Johnson, North Park 
James Jones, North Park 

Nicholas Kalians, North Park 
Glen Knighten, North Park 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Rodger Lee, 69th Street 
Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland Terminal 
John Lemond, North Park 
Gregorio Lugo, Forest Glen 
Wayne Luster, 52nd Street 

Robert Martinez, North Park 

Felix Matias, Archer 

Artie Matsey, Beverly 

Willie McGee, Archer 

Kermit Mitchell Jr., North Avenue 

Edgar Mollinedo, North Park 

Frank Moore, 69th Street 

Bennie Parker, North Avenue 
Jorge Perez, North Park 
Jackie Pritt, Rail-North 



Employees who have received commenda- 
tions since the last listing. 

Garland Rhines, North Park 
Lee Richardson, North Park 

Joseph Smith, Limits 
Verleen Smith, Archer 
Anton Sonju, Forest Glen 
Linda Stewart, Limits 
Vytautas Stukelis, Archer 

Howard Taylor, North Avenue 
Joseph Taylor, North Park 
Robert Thomas, North Park 
Thomas Treat, Forest Glen 

Gerardo Vargas, North Park 

Martin Wellwerts, Archer 
James White, North f'ark 
Roseaner Williams, North Avenue 
Parmela Willis, Archer 
Quentin Wilmington, North Park 
Sammie Woods, North Park 

James Yancey, Limits 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 



Employees honored with a *Day in CTA' 

Transportation Manager James 
Blaa presented certificates of special 
recognition to a bus operator and two 
rapid transit crewmen last month for 
acts of heroism performed by them on 
their respective service routes. 

Honored on "A Day in CTA" were 
Operator Claudette E. Panfil, assigned 
to North Park garage, and Harry L. 
Perry and Enrique Cavazos, trainmen 
at Howard terminal. 

Operator Panfil averted tragedy last 
November 17 when she rescued a 
three-year-old boy who narrowly 
escaped being struck by her eastbound 
Devon Avenue bus in the 1700 block 
of Devon. 

The child, left unattended in his 
parents' car, opened the door on the 
driver's side and stepped into the path 
of the bus. Ms. Panfil stopped the 
vehicle immediately, retrieved the 
child and returned him to his parents, 
who at that moment were coming out 
of a nearby home carrying packages. 
Panfil, who joined the CTA July 21, 
1967, credits her alert action to the 
training she received from CTA in- 
structors. 




"A Day in CTA" honorees show off their certificates of speciai recognition presented for 
their acts of heroism. They are (from ieft) Enrique Cavazos, Ciaudette E. Panfii, and Harry 
L. Perry. Transportation IManager James Biaa (right) made the presentations. 



Motorman Harry Perry and Con- 
ductor Enrique Cavazos were praised 
for the safe evacuation of passengers 
from their southbound North-South 
main line service on January 5 after 
the train caught fire. 

The crewmen led 80 passengers on- 
to the structure and walked them to a 
waiting northbound train. The evacua- 



tion was handled quickly and without 
injuries or complaints from the riders. 
In addition to the certificates of 
recognition, the trio was treated to a day 
of visiting with CTA Transportation 
management which included a tour of 
the Control Center and other facilities, 
and a round-table discussion. 



MARCH, 1982 



ZAP Awards 



Maintenance employees at both 61st 
and Racine terminals underscored 
safety awareness for the fourth con- 
secutive quarter, each with another 
Zero Accident Program award. The 
earned recognition means another first 
place in the rail terminal competition 



for personnel at both locations. 

Meanwhile at 77th Street garage, a 
first place ZAP award was also 
presented, adding to other main- 
tenance safety awards earned at that 
facility. 

Skokie Shop was filled with safety 
award winners as seven areas com- 
pleted the quarter with zero accidents. 
Included were the Paint Shop, Ar- 



mature Room, Blacksmith/Welding, 
Machine Shop, Sub-Assembly/- 
Mechanical, Air Brake/Axle, and 
Sub-Assembly/Electrical. 

Bus Shops areas completing the 
quarter with zero accidents were the 
Paint Shop, Upholstery, Mechanical, 
Inspection Degrease and Tear-Down, 
Machine and Register, Radiator, and 
the Print Shop. 




Above: Foremen and shop leaders at South Shops display first-place Zero Accident Pro- 
gram awards which they received after recording perfect ZAP scores for the fourth 
quarter of 1981. They are (from left) Winmon Lewis, Paint Shop Foreman; Edward Olesky, 
Radiator shop leader; Ernest Johnson, Machine Shop Foreman; Thecia Duszynski, Print 
Shop Leaderi Joseph PratI, Machine Shop Leader; David Maiden, Degreasing Leader; 
John Kurgan, Upholstery Shop Foreman, and Ralph Keane, Utility Foreman. 
Right: Spencer Bennett (center). Day Foreman at 77th Street, shares the pride of person- 
nel for the shop's perfect score in ZAP. Holding the plaque are (from left) Bernard Grant 
and Arthur Warren. 






Above left: Representing first place ZAP award winners at Skokie 
Shop were (from left) Marty Venticinque; Matt Spatzek; Frank Por- 
caro; Ted Lesinak; Jan Broda; Rich Lorimer, Unit Supervisor; Ted 
Szymanski; George Haenisch, Superintendent, Rail Vehicle 
Shops; George Wylie, Acting Unit Supervisor, and Mark Bianchini. 



Above: Thomas Lally, Car Repairman, shows off Racine's first 
place ZAP award as his co-workers look on proudly. Front row 
(from left): Clyde Miller; Henry Dickerson, Rail Unit Supervisor; 
Lally; Roy Mitchell; James Dudley, Maintenance Safety Super- 
visor. Back row: Conwell Johnson; Eddie Wilson; James Spencer; 
Frank Steen, and James Willis. 



Left: Sharing first place honors with Racine were employees at 
61st Street. Jim Dudley, Maintenance Safety Supervisor (seated 
second from left) presented plaques to John Chalmers, Night 
Foreman, and Leon Fields, Day Foreman (center). Supervisor Mike 
Vasquez (seated far right) and Henry Dickerson, Unit Supervisor 
(kneeling), were also present for the presentation. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Robert Hodgetts retires Friends and co-workers 
honored Robert Hodgetts (center wearing white carnation) at an 
open house in the Engineering department. The occasion was 
Hodgetts' retirement after 41 years of service. Hodgetts, 62, a 



Building Construction Specialist, spent his entire career in the 
Engineering department. George Millonas, tt/lanager. Engineering, 
extended best wishes to Hodgetts and thanked him for his 
outstanding service to CTA. 




Skokie Shop 
retirements 

Six Skokie Shop employees were con- 
gratulated by their supervisors in celebra- 
tion of their January 1 retirements. Front 
row (left to right): Bob Flowers, Area 
Superintendent, Rail Vehicle Main- 
tenance; Casimir Jozefiak, Painter, 30 
years service; Sam Javorski, Machinist, 39 
years service; Rudy Chucan, Shopman I, 
36 years service, and Joe Demarco, 
Machinist, 35 years service. Back row (left 
to right): George Wylie, Foreman; Rich 
Lorimer, Unit Supervisor, Unit Overhaul; 
Frank Klinec, Machinist, 35 years service; 
Bryant Paxton, Shopman I, 30 years ser- 
vice, and George Haenisch, Superintend- 
ent, Rail Vehicle Shop. 



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Mail to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
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To insure that you continue to receive your Transit News without 
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dress Notice at least one (1) month prior to moving, or AS SOON 
AS YOU KNOW YOUR NEW ADDRESS. 



MARCH, 1982 



13 



Ashley retires 
after 32 years 

William Ashley, 61, Manager of In- 
surance, and member of the Retire- 
ment Allowance Committee, retired 
March 1 after 32 years of CTA service. 

Ashley, of Elmhurst, is a former 
engineering student. He joined the 
CTA in May 1949, and spent most of 
his career in the Insurance depart- 
ment. He was named to head the 
department on March 1, 1967. 

Members of the Retirement 
Allowance Committee presented 
Ashley with a plaque in testimony of 
his service to the committee at a recent 
luncheon held at the M&M Club in the 
Merchandise Mart. He also received a 
one-year gift membership in the 
Chicago Historical Society. 

A veritable history buff, Ashley 
restores nautical antiques. He is also a 
member of the Arab Patrol of the 
Shriners, and the 32nd degree Army 
of Scottish Rites. 

Ashley and his wife, Lydia, will 
maintain their Elmhurst home. 




William Ashley, Manager of Insurance, Is surrounded by members of fiis staff at an open 
fiouse fionoring ttie veteran employee upon his retirement. 



Ironman Harry 
retires 

"Harry P" may have retired from 
the public transit field after 44 years of 
service, but there are times when it is 
hard to tell. 

"Harry P," to those not in the know, 
is Harry Paolicchi, an Ironworker who 
is a living legend among that hardy 
breed of men who keep the "L" struc- 
ture in tip-top shape. 

Though he ended his career last 
year, replete with a gala farewell party 
in November, Paolicchi occasionally 
returns to his favorite CTA locale— the 
ironworkers' tool crib in West Shops. 

There, he settles in to swap stories 
about the good old days. He was 
named gang foreman in 1960 of the 
ironworkers in the Structures 
Maintenance group of Track and 
Structures, and, for the next seven 
and a half years, he led his crew in 
replacing all the flanges (top and bot- 
tom steel beam track supports) on the 
Jackson Park "L" branch along 63rd 
Street from Prairie to Stony Island 
Avenues. 

In 1976, Paolicchi was promoted to 
foreman of all maintenance welding 
crews and was put in charge of the 




generations of their instruments," 
Kaderbek said. 

Paolicchi began his career in public 
transit with the Chicago Rapid Transit 
Company in 1937 in the Skokie Shop 
as a Car Repairer. In 1939 he trans- 
ferred to Track and Structures and, 
with the exception of military duty 
from 1941 to 1945 during World War 
II, remained there. 

He and his wife, Theresa, live in 
Berwyn. They have a son and 
daughter and two grandsons. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWSl 



Volume 35 



Number 3 



ironworker's tool crib. There he was 
responsible for all of the tools issued to 
the structural workers. 

While running the tool crib, Paoli- 
cchi critiqued the work and talents of 
the latest crop of civil engineers, as 
recalled by Stan Kaderbek, Civil 
Engineer, Track and Structures, 
Maintenance department. 

"Harry also took the opportunity to 
put his repairman's knowledge to 
good use for the CTA. He repaired 
most of the department's heavy-duty 
tools. His repairs became so famous 
that manufacturers of the tools came 
to Harry for advice in designing new 



Published for employees and retirees of tlie CTA by 
tlie Exterr\al Affairs Division, MIcfiael N. Horowitz, 
Manager. 

Editorial and graptilcs by ttie Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowcfiln 
Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by tfie Manage- 
ment Services Department. 
Distributed free of cfiarge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual sut>scrlptlon price to 
otfiers, $6. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
cftandlse Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3S5S, Ctiicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



JOINING THE 
ranks of the retired 
on March 1 was 
ELEANOR GARRO 
who had more than 
42 years service 
with CTA and Its 
predecessor com- 
panies. 



WILLIAM ASHLEY. Manager, 

Insurance, Etnp. 5-12-49 
EDWARD BERNDT, Supervisor, 

District B, Emp. 10-22-45 
WALTER BOCHENEK, Motor Cleaner, 

Harlem, Emp. 8-5-71 
WILLIAM CAFFREY, Val. Tech., 

Prop. Acctg., Emp. 12-9-48 
GEORGE DeBROE, Operator, 

52nd Street, Emp. ^-26-47 
MICHAEL DOLL, Lineman, 

West Shops, Emp. 2-5-51 




PATRICK DOYLE, Rail Janitor, 

Maintenance, Emp. 10-28-65 
JOHN FEHLHABER, Substation Atdnt., 

West Shops, Emp. 9-10-45 
EDWARD FORTUNA, Bus Repairer, 

Beverly, Emp. 3-4-47 
ELEANOR GARRO, Briefwriter, 

Law, Emp. 11-10-39 
MARVIN HENDERSON, Box Puller, 

77th Street, Emp. 6-6-57 
CHESTER KONOPACKI, Collector, 

Limits, Emp. 12-22-60 
HARRY LISTECKl, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 11-27-53 
AARON PRUITT, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 11-16-61 
LUTHER WAKEFIELD, Conductor, 

95/Dan Ryan, Emp. 7-2-53 
FRANK WSOL, Area Superintendent, 

77th Street, Emp. 5-15-46 
FRANK ZIECINA, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 3-3-58 

DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 

GEORGE CHRYSANTHOPOULOS, B/T 
Mech., South Shops, Emp. 9-21-70 

EDWARD MULVANEY, Operator, 
69th Street, Emp. 5-11-61 

JOSEPH SALVATO, Operator, 
Forest Glen, Emp. 2-15-68 



Service anniversaries in March 



40 
years 



Leroy Hagen 

South Shops 




35 years 



Harold Bemdt, Maintenance 
Eugene Drzewicki, North Park 
Hoseha Johnson. 69th Street 
John Joyce, Forest Glen 
Robert Lemke, Forest Glen 
James Madden, Insurance 
Dagmar McNamara, Materials Mgt. 
Richard Meeker, Claims 
Anthony Mustacchio, Utility 
Stanley Nieman, South Shops 
Thomas Tadevic, South Shops 
Robert Toft, North Avenue 



30 years 



George Burns, Ashland/95th 
Daniel Fitzgibbon, Utility 
David Munyer, Treasury 
William Nichols, Maintenance 
Roscoe Wilson, Central District 
Austion Woolfolk, Archer 



25 years 



Edward Barrett, 77th Street 
Ernest Brown, 77th Street 
Charles Cole, 77th Street 
Venetia Helm, South Section 
Charles Henderson, 77th Street 
James House, Skokie Shop 
Shelton Jenkins, Security 
Dennis Kuhn, Stores 
Arthur Lee, Instruction 
Charles Lindsey, 77th Street 
James Massey, 69th Street 
Clovee Mattox, North Avenue 
William Miller, South Shops 
Nathaniel Mosley, Washington 
Houston Nettles, 77th Street 
James Parker, 77th Street 
Edward Potter, 77th Street 
James Rigney, Maintenance 
Richard Rossborough, Archer 
Wendell Slay Jr., 69th Street 
John Smith, Maintenance 
Leo Stern, North Park 
Aaron Wrighs, Utility 



i3sr is/l:eijs/lo:e^x.a^is/l 



BENJAMIN BEACH, 69, 77th Street, 

Emp 12-18-44, Died 1-27-82 
ALBIN BERNOT, 91, Skokie Shop, 

Emp. 3-17-20, Died 1-4-82 
JOSEPH J. CAPPELLETTI, 67, Schedules, 

Emp. 10-20-41, Died 1-3-82 
JOHN L. CROLL, 84, North Park, 

Emp. 7-1-29, Died 11-27-81 
ADA M. DAILY, 77, North Section, 

Emp. 6-12-45, Died 1-14-82 
HERBERT W. FOSTER, 83, North Avenue, 

Emp. 11-22-27, Died 1-4-82 
ERNEST J GAICHAS, 76, Skokie Shop, 

Emp 4-11-21, Died 1-14-82 
DANIEL GALLAGHER, 75, Lawndale, 

Emp 1-13-42, Died 1-21-82 
FRANK GOEDE, 75, North Section, 

Emp 6-15-43, Died 1-28-82 
JOSEPH GUILFOYLE, 80, Limits, 

Emp 6-21-24, Died 1-12-82 
WALTER G HARRISON, 78, 69th Street, 

Emp. 7-3-25, Died 1-6-82 
JOSEPH E HASSMAN, 67, 54th Street, 

Emp. 2-12-60, Died 1-12-82 
CURTIS JAMES, 48, North Avenue, 

Emp. 7-11-55, Died 1-30-82 
MELVIN E. JONES, 79, 77th Street, 

Emp 12-8-26, Died 1-25-82 
MARTIN J. JOYCE, 81, North Section, 

Emp 6-20-23, Died 1-5-82 
BERNARD J. MATHEN, 78, North Section, 

Emp. 5-9-44, Died 1-15-82 
MARY F. McDONOUGH, 73, North Section, 

Emp. 10-1-46, Died 1-2-82 
GEORGE I McLELLAN, 73, North Avenue, 

Emp 2-3-43, Died 1-9-82 
MARY G. MEEHAN, 88, South Section, 

Emp 9-26-28, Died 1-13-82 
BETTY MEER, 70, North Section, 

Emp. 7-15-43, Died 1-13-82 
LEWIS P MONCKTON, 85, Limits, 

Emp 8-19-16, Died 1-10-82 
MICHAEL J O'MALLEY, 74, North Park, 

Emp. 10-7-42, Died 1-17-82 
HARRY PEARLMAN, 84, North Park, 

Emp. 8-11-41, Died 1-14-82 
FRANK R PORCARO, 84, West Shops, 
• Emp 5-6-29, Died 1-23-82 
VIVIAN REED, 81. West Section, 

Emp. 10-25-38, Died 1-21-82 
ROBIN ROLLINS, 26, Human Resources, 

Emp. 7-9-79, Died 2-8-82 
STANLEY RYBICKI, 88, North Park, 

Emp. 4-16-43, Died 1-11-82 
JOSEPH SANTUCCI, 60, Forest Glen, 

Emp 12-7-61, Died 2-9-82 
EDWARD R. SWANSON, 68, 69th Street, 

Emp. 12-15-44. Died 1-31-82 
THEODORE F. SWIDER, 68, North Avenue, 

Emp. 8-21-46, Died 1-25-82 
WILLIAM A TOBIN, 84, Limits, 

Emp 11-3-20, Died 1-16-82 
RAYMOND WILL, 90, Way & Structures, 

Emp 1-11-46, Died 1-10-82 
ALONZO H. WILLIAMS, 91, South Shops, 

Emp. 8-16-30, Died 12-25-81 
ADAM A. ZARAZA, 67, South Shops, 

Emp 11-21-66, Died 1-22-82 
SAMUEL ZURO, 48, West Section, 

Emp. 10-26-59, Died 2-6-82 



MARCH, 1982 



2ind Annual 

eta 

svrs 

no.s.sso 

Applications are being accepted 
through April 3 from bus operators 
who wish to compete in the 1982 CTA 
Bus Roadeo. 

A written test concerning Rules of 
the Road, CTA operating procedures, 
and defensive driving principles, will 
be given during April, and the driving 
competition will take place during 
May. 

Entrance requirements and prizes 
will be the same as last year, except 
that the first place winner will receive 
an all-expense-paid trip to Boston in 
October, where he or she will repre- 
sent CTA in the APTA Innternational 
Bus Roadeo. 

So watch your bulletin board for 
more details, get an entry form from 
your garage superintendent, and 
come on out and join the fun. 

You may be our next champion! 



WANTED 



for the June issue of TRANSIT NEWS: 

Pictures of high school or college 

students graduating in 1982 who are sons 
or daughters of CTA employees. 

All pictures must be taken by a profes- 
sional photographer and MUST be wallet 
size. On the back of the picture, please pro- 
vide the student's full name and school as 
well as the employee's name and work loca- 
tion. Pictures will be returned. 

Please submit pictures to: CTA TRANS- 
IT NEWS, Merchandise Mart, Room 
734, Chicago, IL 60654. 
Deadline for Pictures -May 14, 1982 




CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



DOCUMENTS' LIERAniAN TN 

Govt. Publications Depar,tment 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 




Engineers guide 
O'Hare Extension 
progress 

The O'Hare Extension, which is now taking shape in the 
median of the Kennedy Expressway between Jefferson Park 
terminal and O'Hare Internationa! Airport, is scheduled to 
provide a direct rapid transit connection be- 
tween the airport and the entire CTA system beginning in 
early 1983. 

Designing and building 'this addition to Chicago's rapid 
transit system is a major engineering accomplishment. To 
insure that the completed route will meet CTA specifications 
and operate efficiently, CTA engineers have been working 
closely with engineers from the City of Chicago, Depart- 
ment of Public Works (DPW), throughout the design and 
construction . 

It was just over four years ago that CTA and DPW 



View southwest from the Harlem Avenue overpass shows struc- 
tural steel work in place for the Harlem Avenue station and 
busway bridge. The light-colored building in the baci^ground is the 
Harlem electrical substation. The "Kiss-N-Ride" lot will be 
located at station level on the south side of the expressway be- 
tween the substation and the busway. 

engineers held the first meeting of the O'Hare Extension 
Design and Construction Committee to plan the project. 
Charles Petzold, Chief Transportation Engineer, DPW, and 
Chris Kalogeras, Director, Plant Engineering, CTA, co-chair 
the committee. Other committee members are from the 
CTA Facilities Engineering and Maintenance, Operations 
Planning, Transportation, and Equipment Engineering and 
Maintenance departments. In addition, representatives from 
other departments have been called upon as required to ad- 
vise the committee on matters concerning their specialties. 

(continued on page 2) 




TRANS T NEW 



FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

APRIL, 1982 



O'Hare Extension 

(continued from page 1) 



Construction is weli under way at the 
Cumberland Avenue station. Right: 
Southwest view from the Cumberiand 
Avenue overpass shows construction of 
support piiiars for the 728-car "Parl(-N- 
Ride" faciiity. The iight-coiored buiiding 
at left is an electrical substation. Far 
right: West view from overpass shows 
construction of station platform and per- 
manent (inner) structural wails separating 
the right-of-way from the expressway. 



Below: Ballast, ties, and running rails are 
In place on the median strip west of l\1ann- 
heim Road. The O'Hare International Air- 
port control tower is visible In the 
background at right. 





During the early stages of the project, the committee con- 
cerned itself with overall planning, especially the staging and 
scheduling of the major phases of design and construction to 
insure timely and efficient completion. Other preliminary 
matters of discussion included land acquisition, public hear- 
ings, and funding. 

As work progresses, every phase of the design and con- 
struction is monitored and controlled by CTA and DPW 
engineers. The committee controls work on stations, 
maintenance facilities, track and right-of-way, electrical 
substations and third rail power, train control (cab signaling), 
system graphics, and many other details. As problems or 
areas of special concern are identified, they are also logged 



as specific assignments and carefully controlled. 

The committee also acts as a clearing house by reviewing 
the specifications and engineering drawings produced by 
DPW engineers and design consultants and construction 
companies working for DPW. These materials are referred 
to the appropriate sections of CTA's Facilities Engineering 
and Maintenance department, where the hundreds of con- 
struction documents are approved, or revised if necessary, 
to guarantee that the finished facility will meet CTA re- 
quirements. CTA engineers are responsible for the design of 
the train control system, and CTA engineers also periodical- 
ly join DPW engineers on inspection tours of the construc- 
tion sites. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





Members of the O'Hare Extension Design 
and Construction Committee review the 
manufacturer's specification brochure for 
a switchman's shed being considered for 
use in the Rosemont Yard. Left to right: 
Kendricl( Bisset, Superintendent, Signai 
Design Engineering; Jim Coppock, 
Transportation Engineer (DPW); Larry 
Oomens, Planning Analyst, Transporta- 
tion Department; Charles Petzold, Chief 
Transportation Engineer (DPW); Chris 
Kalogeras, Director, Plant Engineering; 
Paul Swanson, Superintendent, Plant 
Technical Services; Joe Siegal, 
Superintendent, Power and Wiring 
Design; John Holcomb, Superintendent, 
Architectural Engineering, and Roy Smith, 
Superintendent, Civil Engineering. 



When complGted, the 7.6-mile O'Hare Extension will 
operate on two tracks, extending the Milwaukee branch of 
the rapid transit to a subway ternninal under the main park- 
ing garage at O'Hare. Travel time between the airport and 
the Loop will be 33 minutes. There will be three in- 
termediate expressway median stations--Har!em Avenue, 
Cumberland Avenue, and Rosemont (River Road)-with 
platforms that will be long enough to accommodate 10-car 
trains. 

Each intermediate station will include a bus terminal for 
use by CTA and suburban buses, which will be rerouted to 
serve the new stations. "Kiss-N-Ride" facilities will adjoin the 
three stations, and the Cumberland Avenue and Rosemont 



stations will also feature "Park-N-Ride" facilities for 728 and 
710 automobiles, respectively. 

The new Rosemont Yard, directly west of Rosemont sta- 
tion, will provide storage track for 226 rapid transit cars. Its 
4-track maintenance shop, with inside car washing facilities, 
will have a 20-car capacity. 

When the O'Hare Extension is officially turned over to 
CTA by the City of Chicago, it will be ready to run. The 
Transportation department will just "turn the key" and start 
operating the service -- thanks to the extensive background 
work performed by CTA and DPW engineers. 



APRIL, 1982 



From the 
Chairman 

Professionalism 

The most valuable resource con- 
tributing to the success of any 
organization is a work force of 
dedicated employees who perform 
their jobs in a professional manner. As 
I have begun to work more closely 
with various departments throughout 
CTA, 1 am directing my attention 
towards a higher level of profes- 
sionalism and dedication to duty that I 
know each of you can achieve. Past 
laurels do not serve a vital system such 
as ours. We must continue to achieve. 

Professional employees follow a 
strong work ethic which causes them 
to base their many daily decisions on 
the question, "What can 1 do to get my 
job done in the best way possible?" 
Their activities are not strictly limited 
by the time clock or their personal 
needs. They are guided by their desire 
to attain success by being a valuable 
asset to the Authority. 

Transit News frequently presents 
examples of employees throughout 
CTA who demonstrate profes- 
sionalism by putting extra time, effort, 
and creativity into the performance of 
their jobs — thereby benefiting 
themselves, their fellow employees, 
the Authority, and our community. 
This issue reports on the thoroughness 
of the work of our engineers, the 
volunteer activities of the Assault and 
Rape Victim Advocacy Program and 
the Explorer Scouting Program held at 
South Shops, the hard work and addi- 
tional time required to hold public 
hearings, and suggestion awards that 
are the result of creative thinking on 
the job. The Commendation Corner 
provides continuing recognition of 
operating employees who give a little 
extra of themselves to serve our riders, 
as does the Day in CTA program in 
the Transportation department. 

Speaking for myself and my fellow 
CTA Board members, 1 can assure 
you that we appreciate the efforts of all 
employees who perform their jobs in a 
professional manner. All supervisory 
employees should continue to extend 
themselves as examples to all. 1 also 
direct supervisory employees to ap- 
propriately encourage and reward 
employees who perform their jobs in 
an outstanding manner, because pro- 
fessionalism is a key to the success of 
our organization. 




Dorie Miller Post honors Cardilli and Hill 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli (second from left) displays Certificate of 
Participation presented to him by McClinton Porter (far left). Director of Dorie 
Miller American Legion Post, Inc., and Superintendent, 77th Street garage. Car- 
dilli took part in the post's building fund drive. Lonnie Hill, CTA Training Center 
Superintendent and post member (second from right), shows Certificate of Ap- 
preciation he received from Harry Reddrick (center). Second Vice President of 
Dorie Miller post. Reddrick is the Transportation department's personnel director. 
He presented the award to Hill for his activities on behalf of the post. Miles Smith 
(far right). Dorie Miller post commander, inducted Cardilli into the post. Smith is 
an Assistant Superintendent/Controller. Control Center. Award presentations 
were made at the post's Commander's Ball in Niko's restaurant, Bridgeview, at- 
tended by 356 persons. Proceeds of the ball go to the organization's building 
fund. The post now uses rented quarters. Members of the post provide a 
charitable program for Hines Veterans Hospital patients and a scholarship fund 
for four top high school juniors to attend the American Legion's Boys State civic 
seminar at Eastern Illinois University, Charleston 




Amalgamated Transit Union Local 241 was well represented in Chicago's annual St. 
Patrick's Day parade on IVIarch 17 as its float moved along Dearborn street. Parade 
watchers were greeted by (from left) Timothy O'Rourke, Union Board Member; Tyree 
Watts, Warden; Jackie Breckenridge, Second Vice President; Mary Guice, Bus Operator, 
North Park garage; Board President John Weatherspoon, and Joan Georgeson, general 
office. Merchandise Mart. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA at work 

Public hearings 

Newspaper stories and radio and 
television broadcasts have highlighted 
the recent public hearings held by 
CTA. 

There are two types of public hear- 
ings that attract the most news media 
attention--those dealing with service 
and route changes, and those dealing 
with proposed fare changes. 

David Phillips, Superintendent, Ser- 
vice Planning group, and his staff han- 
dle route change public hearings. 
Michael Grovak, Superintendent, Ser- 
vice Analysis/Research group, and his 
staff handle fare change public hear- 
ings. Both groups are in the Opera- 
tions Planning department. 

"The mechanics of setting up public 
hearings involves a directive from the 
CTA Board to the Operations Plan- 
ning department, headed by Manager 
Harry Hirsch," said Phillips. 

"For instance, the recent set of 
changes were mandated by the Board 
to reduce the CTA's operating costs," 
Phillips said. 

He explained that the Board's first 
action was a directive to the CTA staff 
to draft proposals for service modifica- 
tions to reduce operating costs by 
about $18 million a year. 

"The 10 members of the Service 
Planning group and I worked up pro- 
posals and submitted them to Stephen 
Leglcr, Director of the Routes and 
Systems section in the Operations 
Planning department, and to Mr. 
Hirsch," Phillips said. 

Phillips and his staff had examined 
the existing ridership figures from 
lightly-used bus routes and 'L' stations. 
They then considered the impact on 
riders of widening headways, reducing 
periods of service, changing or 
eliminating designated bus routes, and 
closing 'L' stations on weekends and 
during off-peak ridership hours. 

Meetings also were held with CTA 
Chairman Michael A. Cardilli, General 
Operations Manager Harold H. 
Geissenheimer, and the Law depart- 
ment. 

The final draft of recommendations 
won approval of the CTA Board. 

The next step, Phillips explained, 
was the drafting of notices of public 
hearings to appear in newspapers of 
general circulation and in community 
newspapers in areas affected by the 
proposed changes. Published notices 
must appear 30 days before the hear- 
ings. 

Up to this point, the steps taken by 
CTA were in compliance with the 




At a fare option public hearing held March 18 in the CTA Board Room, TV crews (at left) 
and other media observe comments from a member of the public at podium (right). 
Representing CTA at the head table were: Board Members Nicholas Rugglero, John J. 
Hoellen, and Jordan Jay Hillman; Stephen Legler, Director, Routes and Systems; and 
Michael Grovak, Superintendent, Service Analysis/Research group. 



guidelines set by the Urban Mass 
Transportation Administration (UMTA) 
of the U.S. Department of Transporta- 
tion (DOT). 

Phillips explained that UMTA pro- 
vides funds to CTA and has authority 
to set guidelines on the procedures 
used in considering service changes. 

Although not required by UMTA 
guidelines, CTA also posts notices of 
public hearings concerning service or 
fare changes, showing dates, times, 
and locations, in 'L" stations and on 
trains and buses in the areas affected. 

Neighborhood hearing sites were 
selected for the city's north, northwest, 
west, southwest, south, and far south 
sides. Sites also were selected for 
north suburban and west suburban 
CTA service areas, as well as a central- 
ly located hearing scheduled in the 
Merchandise Mart. 

At each public hearing, a court 
reporter recorded all verba! comments 
from the public. The CTA staff 
member in charge of each hearing had 
asked members of the audience to sign 
the speakers' list which would deter- 
mine the order of presentations. Writ- 
ten comments also were invited from 
the audience. 

Each public hearing officially 
opened with the following statement: 
"This public hearing is being held in 
accordance with the requirements of 
the United States Transportation 
Department, Urban Mass Transporta- 
tion Administration. Its primary pur- 
pose is to provide interested parties 
the opportunity to voice their opinions 
and suggestions on the economic, 
social, and environmental impacts of 



CTA's proposed service changes." 

Reasons for the proposed bus or rail 
service changes were explained, 
route -by -route, station -by -station, 
with alternate service options available 
to riders. 

Summaries of the comments re- 
ceived from the public during the hear- 
ings were compiled in a report and 
distributed to the members of the CTA 
Board and appropriate CTA depart- 
ment managers. Most of the public 
hearings were also attended by CTA 
Board members and department 
managers. 

The most recent public hearings con- 
cerning fare options, conducted by 
Michael Grovak and the Service 
Analysis/Research group, included nine 
fare options for public comment, and 
followed procedures similar to those of 
the hearings conducted by Phillips and 
the Service Planning group. 

The third type of public hearing, 
held by CTA's Capital Development 
department, does not usually attract 
extensive news media interest. These 
are public hearings mandated by 
UMTA for capital improvement pro- 
jects which are usually 80 per cent 
federally funded by UMTA and 20 per 
cent state funded by the Illinois 
Department of Transportation (IDOT). 

These public hearings also are an- 
nounced in newspapers, and verbal 
and written comments are invited from 
the audience during the hearings, 
usually held in the CTA Board Room. 

The comments from the public, as 
well as other pertinent documents, are 
compiled in a report and submitted to 
UMTA and IDOT. 



APRIL. 1982 



Lindberg Mitchell (North 
Avenue garage) was thanked 
for "the privilege of riding" 
his #54 Cicero bus by Arnlta 
Bonds, of Race Avenue. "I 
boarded the bus at Addison. 
To my surprise, I was greeted 
with a kind and courteous 
smile. This driver has to be 
one of your better employees. 
He clearly called out all the 
stops, and even took the time 
to wait on one elderly woman 
who was shuffling to catch 
up to his bus. Through all of 
this kindness he still seemed 
to have made very accurate 
timing. Please inform this 
wonderful man to keep up the 
good work." 




Fisher Ratliff (77th Street 
garage) was described as "a 
wonderful bus driver" by 
Dorothy Luckett, of East 60th 
Street, who was a rider on his 
#4 Cottage Grove bus. "He 
politely and courteously 
assisted all who boarded and 
disembarked from his bus. 
He would carefully approach 
slippery corners and allow 
passengers time to get off 
carefully. He was just simply 
wonderful, and everyone 
praised him for being so kind 
to us. Again may I take the 
liberty to thank him for all of 
us who were trying so hard 
not to have a dreaded fall this 
morning." 



commendation corner 



Robert Kremer (North Park garage) was praised by Henry 
Sax, of West Oak Street, who rode with his wife on 
Kremer's *11 Lincoln bus. "We were greeted with a pleas- 
ant 'Good morning' as we boarded, and were told to be 
careful. He called every main stop and greeted everyone 
with a smile and a 'Good morning'. This continued all along 
the route, and as we got off at State and Madison, the driver 
wished us a pleasant and healthy day. As a senior citizen, 
this was as good a start for a day as I have received in my 
77 years. Please let him know that we appreciated our ride 
with him." 



Gloria Haynes (North Avenue garage) was the operator of 
a *73 Armitage bus that Vi Brewer, of North Kenneth 
Avenue, rode one evening with her sister. "When I got 
home to open my door, my keys were gone, along with my 
CTA monthly pass, which was attached to them. Having to 
pay for six more days of getting to work would have been 
bad enough, but replacing house and office keys would be 
worse. A short time later, we were called by CTA. The 
operator had found the keys and pass, and was leaving 
them at the barn on Cicero and North for us to pick up. 
Please see that the terminal gets my thanks, and also the 
nice operator." 



Sam Thomas (Special Services) was appreciated by 
Joseph Gierut, of South Marshfield Avenue. "I have been 
participating in the CTA's handicapped program since its in- 
ception. Mr. Thomas has gone out of his way to help me, 
especially during inclement weather. He always lends a 
sturdy shoulder to lean on, and he also has a kind word 
when picking me up or dropping me off. If the media or 
public could come in contact with employees like Mr. 
Thomas, their view of the CTA would be much different. 
He is an employee who is a credit not only to your hand- 
icapped program, but to the CTA in general." 



Lenard Gilbert Jr. (Central District) was the subject of a 
letter from Mrs. Louis Lebin, of Harbor Point Drive. 
"Recently, I was at a street crossing unable to cross easily on 
wet pavement, and your supervisor, Mr. Lenard Gilbert, 
kindly helped me cross the streets. Certainly it was not at all 
in the line of duty as a supervisor, but as a very under- 
standing and kind person, if only the world would employ 
and learn to appreciate people like Mr. Gilbert, there would 
truly be kindness in all the world. Many thanks to a CTA that 
employs many desirable people." 



Adolph Marth (Forest Glen garage) was complimented for 
his courtesy and careful driving of a *81 Lawrence bus by 
Max Witt, of Keystone Avenue. "He greeted everyone 
entering the bus with 'Good morning, and be careful and 
hold on as 1 start moving the bus.' Upon leaving, it was 
'Please be careful and have a nice day.' This leaves you with 
a good feeling. Of course, he is a smooth driver and calls out 
the streets. At times he urged passengers to use care on the 
slick streets. It was a sense of delight to know that the CTA 
has such employees that care." 



Leon Washington (77th Street garage) was applauded as 
"someone who cares" by Lois White, of South Ada Street, 
who was a rider on his *79 79th Street bus. "The driver was 
so kind, he spoke to each and everyone who got on the bus 
with a friendly 'Good morning' and called every stop. When 
we were leaving the bus, he said 'Good-bye, have a nice 
day, and watch your purse.' It makes you feel good to know 
that people care and can still be nice if they try. I hope he 
keeps right on being like that, and may God bless him." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees honored with a 'Day in CTA' 



Another train crew has been 
honored on "A Day in CTA" in con- 
nection with the evacuation of 80 
passengers from the southbound 
North-South main line train which 
caught fire on January 5. 

Transportation Manager James 
Blaa presented certificates of special 
recognition to Motorman Walter Horst 
and Conductor William Henderson of 
the 61st Street terminal for the safe 
and expeditious manner in which they 
assisted Motorman Harry Perry and 
Conductor Enrique Cavazos of 
Howard terminal on the bitter cold 
day. The trainmen led riders onto the 
structure and walked them to the 
waiting Horst-Henderson northbound 
train. Perry and Cavazos were cited 
last month for their part in the rescue. 

Blaa also presented a certificate of 
special recognition to Nathaniel 
Payne, a Bus Instructor at the Limits 
Training Center. Payne helped to 
develop the Special Services Bus 
Operator Training program which was 
designed for operators assigned to the 
"Access Transportation" program for 
limited mobility riders. 

Blaa said Payne worked with the 
Training/Development Programs sec- 
tion helping to develop the training 




Transportation Manager James Blaa presents certificates of special recognition to "A 
Day in CTA" honorees for their outstanding performance. The honorees are (from left) 
Train crewmen Walter Horst and William Henderson, and Bus Instructor Nathaniel 
Payne. 



modules for the program. He spent 
numerous hours working at home to 
make the necessary revisions to keep 
the program current. Payne was head 



instructor in the three training pro- 
grams conducted for operators as- 
signed to "Access Transportation," 
Blaa said. 



Thanks — 

for a job well done 



Employees wlio haue received commendations 
since ttie last listing. 



Edward Anderson, 52nd Street 

Pedro Balderas, Lawndale 
Arnold Beler, North Park 
Orbin Bell, Archer 
Adonis Berrios, Forest Glen 
Sterling Bolton, North Avenue 
Rochelle Brooks, Archer 

Lawrence Carter, 77th Street 
Albert Clark, 69th Street 
Wesley Cole, Ashland/95th 
Ernest Collins, Archer 
Larry Craig, Lawndale 

Earmon Davis, 52nd Street 
Maurice Dean, Howard 
Oscar DeSoto, North Park 
Oscar Douglas Jr., North Park 



Juan Gonzalez, North Park 
Dionisio Gonzalez, North Park 
Gerardo Gonzalez, Limits 
Keith Griffin, 69th Street 

John Hawkins, 69th Street 
Henry Hinkle, 69th Street 
Linda Hopps, Control Center 

Daniel Joseph, North Park 

Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 

Robert McCoy, North Park 
Jenniece Mitchell, South Section 
Lawrence Moore, Central Dist. 
Guilford Moore, North Avenue 

Jose Nieves, Archer 



Richard Paschal, North Park 
Jorge Perez, North Park 
Arthur Preston, 77th Street 

Chester Robertson, North Park 

Linda Stewart, Limits 
Vytautas Stukelis, Archer 

Earl Terry, Forest Glen 

Early Watson Jr., Archer 
Claudette Westbrook, Ash/95th 
Albert White Jr., Archer 
Lowell Wilson, Beverly 
Thester Winston, Forest Glen 

James Yancey, Limits 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 



APRIL, 1982 



Explorers complete 
mini-doubledecker 



Nearly 30 volunteer advisors from 
South Shops worked side by side with 
85 high school students in a special 
Explorer Scouting program last 
month, helping the students develop a 
career awareness in a variety of trade 
skills. 

The scouts, members of CTA spon- 
sored Explorer P<3st 9777, constructed a 
mini-doubledecker bus patterned after 
the replica of a 1925 Chicago Motor 
Coach bus. The model encompassed 
the skills of student mechanics, electri- 
cians, welders, painters, and carpenters. 
A graduation program at South Shops 
marked the culmination of the 10-week 
project. 

The mini-doubledecker bus was 
constructed from scrap and donated 
materials. It is run by an electric 
motor with power from six batteries 
and features operational headlights. 




tail-lights, turn signals, and side 
marker lights. 

Additionally, the students refur- 
bished an electric motorized shop cart 



Hot off the presses 

In cooperation with the Service 
Employees International Union, Local 
25, the Operations Planning depart- 
ment has published a night and owl 
service map showing all bus and 
rapid transit routes that operate after 
10 p.m. in black and all routes that 
operate all night long in red. At the 
suggestion of the union, the map is 
printed in English, Spanish, and Polish 
because a significant percentage of 
their employees speak primarily 
Spanish or Polish. The map is folded 
to pocket size, and a pocket-size 
schedule card for routes leaving the 
downtown area after 10 p.m. has also 
been published. 

These publications have been 
distributed to bus operators, conduc- 
tors, and ticket agents who work night 
schedules. They are encouraged to 
keep a copy for reference and carry 
copies to give to riders who need 
them. 

The Spring-Summer, 1982, edition 
of the CTA Route Map containing a 
system map, downtown map, and 
route descriptions for all CTA services 
has also been published and 
distributed. 

All of the above publications are 
available to the public at rail ticket 
agents' booths, or they may be obtained 
from the Public Affairs office. 



CTA Night service 

Service in operation after 
10:00 PMMon-Fri 

CTA Owl service 

All-night service shown 
in red 

Servicjo Nocturno de la CTA 

Servicio en operaci6n despues 
delaslOPMdeLunaVier 

Servicio de la CTA 
durante toda la noche 



CTA Nocne kursy 

Kursy po godzinie 10 PM, Poniediiaiek do Pi^tku 

CTA Kursujqce przez cafa noc 

Nocna usKuga wskazane j caerwonym 




donated by a vendor. The cart was 
customized with a body fabricated 
from sheet metal and wood to resem- 
ble the front end of a street car. 

The project was the second annual 
special scouting program sponsored 
by the Chicago Area Council Explor- 
ing Division, Boy Scouts of America. 
The council worked with the Chicago 
Board of Education to make the 
scouting program with CTA possible. 

Continuing in their capacity as 
members of the organizing committee 
for the special scouting project were 
Frank Sprovieri, Carpenter Leader, 
who served as Explorer Post advisor; 
Willie Wong, Unit Supervisor of Bus 
Garages, management coordinator. 
Committee members are Frank 
Venezia, Area Superintendent, Bus 
Shops; Robert C. Lee, Unit Super- 
visor, Bus Maintenance; Al Haas, 
Unit Supervisor, Body Shop. 

Volunteer advisors from South 
Shops who worked with the students 
were: Carpenter Foremen William 
Miller and Al Zielinski; Assistant 
Foremen Robert Brown and Robert 
O. Hargrave; Carpenters Marshall 
Coleman, Bettina Phillips, David 
Valauskas, Donna Poole, and Larry 
Hughey. 

Other volunteers were: Electrician 
Assistant Foreman Leon Griffith, 
and Electrician Donald Freebairn; 
Sheet Metal Tinner Foreman Ray- 
mond Klaub, and Sheet Metal 
Workers Martin Muraski and 
Casiniir Noga; Painter Foreman Win- 
mon Lewis, and Painters John Seay 
and Kenneth Pott; Welder Foreman 
Oliver Ross, and Welders Preston 
Phillips, Fred Kerr, and David 
Vallon; Mechanics George Holland 
and Walter Weber. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Advocates review successful program 



Volunteer advocates participating in 
CTA's Assault and Rape Victim Ad- 
vocacy Program say the program is 
one of the most human, caring ac- 
tivities being conducted for CTA 
employees. 

At a program evaluation held at 
Limits garage last month, 20 ad- 
vocates from various work locations 
told CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli 
that the program shows that CTA 
management is sensitive to the needs 
of employees, and concerned for their 
welfare and safety. 

"I appreciate what you're doing," 
Cardilli responded. "You're off to a 
very good start, and it is my hope that 
this will continue into the future." 

Advocates are trained to aid and 
comfort victims of rape and assault. As 
sympathetic intermediaries, the ad- 
vocates may speak on the victims" 
behalf during police and CTA in- 
vestigations, and as hospital pro- 
cedures are being carried out. They 
may also help answer questions of 
family members, and inform victims of 
availability of professional counseling. 
Advocates may also serve as sounding 
boards when the victims need to talk 
about their situations. 

Transportation Manager James Blaa, 
who implemented the program last 
summer, expressed appreciation to 
Dickelle Fonda and Barbara Engel of the 
Women's Services department. Loop 
Center YWCA of Metropolitan 
Chicago, for their cooperation with CTA 
in developing the Advocacy program. 

Mary Beth Cobleigh, an Assistant 
Superintendent in the Transportation 
department and Advocacy Program 
Coordinator, said that subsequent 
segments of the program will provide 
sensitivity training for men. 

Volunteer advocate Rosemary 
Bamett, also of the Transportation 
department, said the program has 
helped her reach out more to other peo- 
ple. "I am also making a special effort to 
inform others about their misconcep- 
tions of rape, particularly men." As a 
result of being involved in the CTA Ad- 
vocacy Program, Bamett is also in- 
volved in a speaker training class on the 
subject of rape, which is part of the 
YWCA Public Education Program 
which goes out into the community. 

Shirley McClure of Transportation, 
also noting that people have many 
misconceptions about rape, said, "I 
have been able to provide a lot of in- 
formation at the community level as a 
participant in the speaker's program. 1 
know that what we are doing is worth- 





CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli tells advocates at Limits evaluation session that the Ad- 
vocacy Program is off to a good start and that he appreciates their volunteer work. 

while and a help to many others." 

Katy Moriarty, Special Assistant to the 
Transportation Manager, commented, 
"The advocacy program has given me 
insight into the concept of rape, its effect 
and aftereffects, and has taught me how 
to listen reflectively." 

On the subject of reflective listening, 
Juanita Duff, a general office 
employee, explained that reflective 
listening means listening to the in- 
dividual and understanding, rather 
than relating one's own story in return. 
"The advocacy program is good for 
morale," said Duff. 

Other advocates had these com- 
ments: 

"Having a trained advocate caring 
and ready to help during a time of 
crisis can be the difference between 
making a smooth transition back to 
work, or carrying painful scars that 
may not only interfere with good per- 
formance, but with an employee's per- 
sonal life as well." — Patricia A. Mglej, 
Assistant Superintendent/Controller. 

"The advocacy program gives the 
employee a feeling of security know- 
ing there is someone with the Authori- 
ty with whom one can 
confide."— Verleen Smith, Pool Bus 
Service Supervisor. 

"This program is a step toward the 
Authority fostering cohesiveness. It 
promotes a feeling of caring and shar- 
ing."— Mary H. Manoni, Training 
Coordinator. 



IVIary Beth Cobleigh, Advocacy Program 
Coordinator who is assigned to 
Washington garage as an Assistant 
Superintendent, discusses the program 
with CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli. 

"It makes a difference knowing that 
the employer feels sympathy. Caring 
makes a world of difference." — Effie 
Alexander, Pool Ticket Agent Super- 
visor. 

"If this program is presented at sta- 
tion level I would urge everyone, male 
and female, to attend the training ses- 
sions."— Jenipher C. Finger, Pool Bus 
Service Supervisor. 

Employees wishing to request the 
services of an advocate should phone 
the CTA Control Center, 24 hours a 
day, at 664-9815. The service may 
also be requested to assist an im- 
mediate family member. 



APRIL, 1982 




Ban 

the buck! 



JUNK FOR CAR FARE 

What Some People Hand Conductors 

A certain element of the public 
seems to have rather distorted views 
of what constitutes car fare for a 
good ride extending in a majority of 
cases for many miles. In a little over a 
year they contributed forty-two 
pounds of mutilated pennies and 
slugs that have no value except as 
metal. A worn coin will be redeemed 
by the United States Sub-Treasury if 
the design is not entirely obliterated 
but a mutilated one is a dead loss ex- 
cept in the case of the dime, which 
has a silver value for its contents 
only. 

Among the "junk" deposited as 
"fares" were foreign coins, telephone 
slugs, other city tokens, time checks, 
old beer checks and advertising coins. 

The foreign coins represent almost 
every nation even such far away 
places as India and Egypt. The 
greatest percentage of these foreign 
coins are German pfennig and the 
rentenmark. The Canadian five cent 
piece silver is redeemed at par. 

There are 138 traction companies 
in the United States using tokens as 
fare. Of this number our company 
has made — and is making — exchange 
of tokens with about 90. These out- 
side city tokens come from coast to 
coast and from the north limits to the 
south limits of the United States. 

When a passenger is detected in 
depositing such units in place of 
proper money it furnishes another 
chapter to embarrassing moments 
and conductors for their own protec- 
tion have to be ever vigilant in 
watching the fare tendered or 
deposited in the fare boxes. 



This historical perspective of 
fare collection problems was 
reprinted from the June, 1924, 
issue of Surface Service 
Magazine, the monthly employee 
magazine of the Chicago Surface 
Lines. 



For your benefit 

New dependents' insurance coverage 



Insurance coverage for new 
dependents is not an automatic pro- 
cedure. They must be enrolled. 

Enrollment of new dependents is 
not complicated, but it must be done 
correctly to avoid problems at a later 
date when claims for such dependents 
might be submitted. 

Here are some fictional examples. 

Suppose "Jim Smith" and his wife 
have a new baby daughter. All Jim 
would have to do is to bring his baby's 
birth certificate to the Insurance 
department. There, he would fill out 
the Health Benefit Election Card on 
which he would indicate information 
regarding himself, his present 
dependents, and his new daughter. 

Why should Jim come to the In- 
surance department? Why not just 
pick up the Health Benefit Election 
Card from his department clerk, fill it 
out, and mail it in with the birth cer- 
tificate? 

The personnel in the Insurance 
department have found that a face-to- 
face meeting with an employee who 
has a new dependent provides the 
employee with an opportunity to have 
questions answered to his satisfaction. 

This procedure grew out of 
thousands of meetings during which 
employees have received answers to 
many questions they had not had the 
opportunity to ask before. 

For instance, in Jim's case, he may 
want to check and see who are 
presently enrolled as his dependents. 
He may wish to add his new daughter 
as a beneficiary to his life insurance or 
his retirement plan. 

These changes can only be handled 
by staff members in the Insurance 
department in Room 7-107 in CTA's 
Merchandise Mart headquarters. 

Here is another example: 

What about "Joan Jones" who just 
adopted the three children of her 
deceased brother and sister-in-law? 
Before these children can be con- 
sidered for enrollment, Joan must 
bring in proof of their legal adoption by 
herself; otherwise, they would have 
no coverage. 

A final example might be that of 
"Jack Johnson" who was divorced 
and remarried. 

Before his new wife could be includ- 
ed in the insurance program, Johnson 
must submit copies of the court deci- 
sion regarding his divorce and a valid 
marriage certificate to cover his new 
wife. 



These are only three examples of 
the many possible situations illustrating 
why it is necessary for an employee to 
make a personal visit to the Insurance 
department when a change in 
dependency takes place. 

There are some situations when a 
dependent is no longer eligible for 
coverage. 

For instance, a dependent child 
who has reached age 19 and is not a 
full-time college student is no longer 
eligible. When an employee is di- 
vorced, the former spouse is no longer 
covered, but the legal children under 
age 19, or attending college and under 
23, would still be covered. 

Also not covered is a common-law 
spouse of an employee; children for 
whom the employee is only the legal 
guardian; an employee's brothers, 
sisters, parents, and grandparents; or 
children of a single male employee 
whose name is not on the children's 
birth certificates and he has no 
evidence of court-ordered support for 
the children. 

Insurance department personnel 
daily handle problems dealing with 
employees' coverage for themselves 
and their dependents - - problems 
dealing with life insurance and 
beneficiaries, allowable medical ex- 
penses, basic fee schedules for 
surgery, major medical coverage, den- 
tal and vision care provisions, and 
health maintenance organizations. 

The staff members of the Insurance 
department pride themselves in their 
professional approach toward all 
related problems. 

Employees and dependents having 
additional questions should tele- 
phone the Insurance department on 
ext. 3615 or 3616 from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. weekdays 



Correction 

in the "Ban the buck!" photo 
story on pages 8 and 9 of our 
February issue, the correct name 
of the Box Puller shown in 
photos 1 & 2 should read Mar- 
vin Henderson. We apologize 
to Mr. Henderson for any in- 
convenience that may have 
resulted from our error. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Suggestions 
net cash for 
four shopmen 

Employee suggestions in the first 
quarter of 1982 netted $2,585 in cash 
awards for four veteran CTA 
employees. The top award of $1,800 
went to Gary Wilson, an Electrical 
Worker Leader at Skokie Shop with 
20 years of CTA service. 

Wilson's cost-saving method of 



unloading new rail cars at Skokie 
created better working conditions for 
crews and cut production time in half. 
The procedure requires the use of four 
electric jacks, two on each end to 
elevate the rapid transit car approx- 
imately four inches above its flatbed 
railroad car. The railroad flatbed car is 
then pulled away, and the jacks lower 
the rapid transit car to the tracks. 

The second largest cash award for 
the quarter went to Michael Bay, a 
Production Control Coordinator at 
South Shops. Bay received $590 for 
his plan to replace aluminum fuel tank 



supports for some buses with 
10-guage steel angle iron. Bay joined 
the CTA in 1972. 

Robert Marron, a Carpenter and 
CTA employee since 1964, was 
awarded $110.00 for his support 
brackets for rear windows on 
3000-38^5 series buses. 

Another South Shops worker, 
Louis Alleva, a Sheet Metal Worker, 
received $85.00 for his proposal of us- 
ing low temperature solder for radiator 
repairs. Alleva has 15 years of CTA 
service and is assigned to the Radiator 
Shop. 




Left: Collecting the big cash in the first 
quarter of suggestion awards is Gary 
Wilson (left), Electrical Worker Leader at 
Skokie Shop. On hand to congratulate him 
was George Haenisch, Superintendent of 
Rail Vehicle Shops, Skokie. Wilson receiv- 
ed $1,800, for his time-saving method of 
unloading rapid transit cars. 



Below left: tMichael Bay inspects fuel tank 
supports which he proposed replacing 
with 10-gauge steel angle iron. The idea 
earned the Production Control Coor- 
dinator $590. 



Center: Robert Marron shows off the sup- 
port bracket for rear windows on the 
Series 3000-3875 buses which netted him 
$110 in the suggestion program. 



Below: Sheet Metal Worker Louis Alleva 
demonstrates his suggestion of using low 
temperature solder for radiator repairs. It 
was worth $85. 




APRIL, 1982 



Law for today 

Q. I was called for jury duty and 
my boss refuses to pay me 
while I am gone. Is this legal? 

A. Yes. An employer is not obligated 
to compensate an employee for 
the time taken off for jury duty. (A 
fee and expenses are paid to jurors 
by the county involved). However, 
an employer may not deny an 
employee time off to serve jury du- 
ty. This includes a prohibition 
against an employer requiring a 
night shift worker to work while the 
employee is doing jury duty during 
the day. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I applied for a credit card and 
my application was rejected. 
Can I find out why? 

A. Yes. Under federal and state law 
an applicant for a credit card is en- 
titled, upon request, to be in- 
formed of the reasons for rejection. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I'm fifteen years old; how 
many hours a week may I 
work? 

A. No minor under sixteen years of 
age may work for more than six 
consecutive days in one week, or 
more than 48 hours in any one 
week, or more than eight hours in 
any one day, or between 7 p.m. 
and 7 a.m. from Labor Day until 
June 1 or between 9 p.m. and 7 
a.m. from June 1 to Labor Day. 
Moreover, on days when school is 
in session, a minor may not work 
more than three hours a day out- 
side of school nor may the com- 
bined hours of work outside and in 
school exceed eight hours a day. 

' - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. My boss wants to cut back our 
lunch time to 45 minutes. Can 
he do this? 

A. Under the Illinois Revised Statutes, 
each employer must permit 
employees who are working for 
7V2 continuous hours or longer at 
least a 20 minute meal period 
beginning no later than five hours 
after the start of the work period. 
Thus, state law does not require a 
lunch hour to be an hour. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Submit questions to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield, IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in column. 
Personal answers not possible.) 




Water color 
artist 

John Oddo is a signal maintainer 
whose CTA job is controlled by the 
laws of electricity and mechanics. 

John Oddo is also a water color ar- 
tist whose avocation is controlled only 
by his imagination and creative desire. 

Oddo does both his job and his 
painting very well. 

Though he is only 37, Oddo has 
been with CTA for 19 years. His job as 
signal maintainer in the Maintenance 
department's Communications and 
Signal section, involves repair of the 
various electrical signals and devices 
used on CTA's rapid transit system. 

He takes his painting as seriously as 
he takes his job. 

"My interest in painting goes all the 
way back to my childhood," he ex- 
plained. "I grew up around artists in 
Old Town. I had a strong desire to 
draw, freehand, subjects that attracted 
me when I was small." 

Oddo took all the art classes he 
could at Proviso West Township High 
School, and from 1963 to 1970 he 
studied art at the American Academy 
of Art in Chicago. 

Although he has used pencil, char- 
coal, tempras (opaque water colors). 



Above: John Oddo displays some of his 
water colors for Transit News af West 
Shops. 



acrylic paints, and oils, he prefers 
water colors. 

"I like water colors because they dry 
as soon as they are applied and . unlike 
oils, there is practically no cleanup 
after using them," Oddo explained. 

He said that he has done more than 
a hundred water color paintings. 

"Painting in any media gives me a 
feeling of satisfaction that is impossible 
to put into words," Oddo said. "To ap- 
preciate what I feel, I suggest in- 
terested persons try their hand at 
water color painting. 

"it's really fun, takes only a couple 
of hours to complete a painting, is not 
too expensive, and the finished pro- 
duct, no matter the quality, is a work 
of art." 

Oddo's step-son, James Lofton, 17, 
a St. Patrick High School senior, is 
also artistically talented. Last year he 
won the nationally-coveted Hallmark 
Award for excellence in art for his still 
life line drawing in colored pencils. 

"Taking a picture with a camera of 
an interesting subject is a snap. Paint- 
ing a picture of the same subject is 
pure pleasure," Oddo said. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




At the age of 18, many young students are 
yet undecided about their professional ob- 
jectives, but talented Ledia Nodarse is 
determined to become a fashion designer. 
She is the daughter of CTA Ticket Agent 
Ledia Nodarse, who is assigned to the 
North Section. While still attending Von 
Steuben High School, from which she will 
be graduated in June, Ledia enrolled in 
the Barbizon School of Modeling and 
graduated in January. She plans to attend 
the School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
to major in fashion design. Her outstand- 
ing talents have already earned the 
recognition of teachers like Ms. Joan C. 
Palmer of the Art Institute, who said that 
Ledia shows a great deal of talent in both 
fashion design and illustration and could 
become one of the top designers of the 
future. 



t 




mm 






Bus Operator Julian Galindo, Limits 
garage, and his wife, Maria, recently 
became the proud parents of a baby girl. 
Ileana Galindo was born on March 26, 
1982, at 2:06 p.m. at Edgewater Hospital. 
She weighed 4 pounds, 11 ounces and 
was 18 inches long. 



Complete training program 

Certificates of training were presented to three South Shops electrical workers who 
recently completed a 10-week electrical maintenance training program. On hand for the 
presentation were (from left) Frank Venezia, Superintendent, South Shops; Nick 
Simonetti, Unit Supervisor, and Assistant Instructor Mike Castigllone, electrical 
maintenance man at South Shops. Showing off their new certificates are Tom Domikaitis, 
Terry Reilly, and Wayne Matejka. The Instructor is Charles Townsend. 



Phyllis Skutnik, stenographer in 
the CTA pension section, poses 
with her nephew, Leonard Skutnik, 
28, of Lorton, Va., a Congressional 
Budget Office worker in Washing- 
ton. Skutnik, formerly of Chicago, 
rescued crash-stunned Air Florida 
stewardess Kelly Duncan from 
freezing waters of the Potomac 
River in January. The young 
governmental employee was 
singled out for his heroic deed by 
President Reagan as he delivered 
his State of the Union message to 
the nation on January 12. 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 




YOUR NAME . 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box . 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mail to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merchandise Mart, Chicago, IL 60654. 



3 to receive your Transit News witt^out dress Notice at ieast one (1) montti prior to moving, or AS SOON 

lii out your Subscfiber Ctiange ol Ad AS YOU KNOW YOUR NEW ADDRESS. 



APRIL, 1982 



13 



Lifelong quest 

A quest for the priesthood in the 
Catholic Church -- that began in 1925, 
flickered out in 1931, and was re- 
kindled in 1977 only to be almost 
snuffed out in the same year - will 
come to a fruition June 12. 

Tom Twomey, a 71-year-old retired 
bus repairer, will then be ordained in 
Notre Dame Catholic Church in 
Clarendon Hills and will become 
Father Thomas J. Twomey. 

Twomey will say his first mass for his 
family and friends in Our Lady of the 
Ridge Catholic Church in Chicago 
Ridge at 12:30 p.m. on June 13, 
where he has served as a deacon since 
January. 

"I was a student in Quigley, and 
later, St. Mary of the Lake Seminaries, 
starting in 1925. I wanted to become a 
priest, but then, in 1931 1 had a 
change of mind and left my studies. I 
can't remember why, now that 1 think 
of it," Deacon Twomey said. 

He changed vocations by going to a 
business college and he became a 
secretary for a Loop business for a 
number of years. In 1944 Twomey got 
married. 

Three years later, in 1947, he 
changed vocations again, joined the 
CTA, and trained to become a bus 
repairer in the Maintenance depart- 
ment. 

He eventually was assigned to the 
Maintenance department's Campaign 
Area and helped do special repair 
work on buses in the 52nd, 69th, 
77th, Archer, Beverly, and Lawndale 
garages during the next 22 years. 

Then, in 1969, Twomey retired 
from CTA. In 1976 his wife, Edith, 
died. The couple had been married 32 
years, but had no children. 

"Sometime later, I decided to return 
to my first vocation, the priesthood," 
Twomey recalled. 

A friend suggested Twomey contact 
Bishop Jerome Hastrich of the diocese 
of Gallup, New Mexico. 

"Even though 1 was an older man 
than most who seek the priesthood, 
Bishop Hastrich gave me encourage- 
ment and help," Twomey said. 

Bishop Hastrich arranged for 
Twomey to go to Rome to complete 
his studies for the priesthood. 

"Just after 1 began my studies, 1 con- 
tracted the flu or some such ailment. I 



'ifW^ 



"^"^^ 




was sent to a local doctor who took an 
X-ray of my lungs and said 1 had em- 
physema, and that I should never 
travel in high altitudes," Twomey said. 

Because of this medical report, 
Twomey had to leave the seminary. 

Shocked and dejected, Twomey 
returned to Chicago. He sought other 
medical opinions. Doctors here told 
him emphysema cannot be detected 
by an X-ray machine, thoroughly ex- 
amined him, and pronounced him in 
good health. 

Twomey sent his medical report to 
Bishop Hastrich. 

"The good bishop made ar- 
rangements for me to enter St. Mark's 
Benedictine Seminary near Bowling 
Green, Kentucky," Twomey said. "On 
December 8, 1981, after I completed 
all my studies, I was ordained a 
deacon." 

He has been serving his deaconship 
in Our Lady of the Ridge parish. 

Bishop Hastrich has made plans to 
journey to Chicago to perform the or- 
dination service for Deacon Twomey 
at 11 a.m., June 12. 

Attending the service will be Deacon 
Twomey's twin brother, Joseph, of 
Evanston; a sister, Helen, of Blue 
Island; another sister, Mrs. Catherine 
Joyce of Norwalk, California: a 
nephew, John Joyce of Clarendon 
Hills, and many of Twomey's friends 
in and out of CTA. 

After saying his first mass, the new 



priest will join Bishop Hastrich in the 
Gallup diocese. 

The Gallup diocese covers 55,000 
square miles in northwest New Mexico 
and northeast Arizona. Its far-flung 
missions serve four large Indian reser- 
vations, and many towns and hamlets 
tucked away in the soaring skyline of 
the mountains. 

There, Tom Twomey's quest will be 
fulfilled. 



Send us your story 

Human interest stories like the 
story on this page are often sug- 
gested to Transit News by CTA 
employees and retirees, or their 
friends and associates. 

We would like to print your 
story. If you have a story idea 
about an employee or retiree's 
personal accomplishment or 
about interesting projects being 
performed by your department, 
send a brief summary of your 
story idea to: 

CTA Transit News 

Room 734 

Merchandise Mart 

P. O. Box 3555 

Chicago, Illinois 60654 
Or phone: 

664-7200, ext. 3320 

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
If your story idea is selected for 
publication, we will assign a writer 
and photographer to cover the 
story. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Volume 35 



Number 4 



Published for employees and retirees of the CTA by 
the External Affairs Division, Michael N. Horowitz, 
Manager. 

Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 
Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 




JOINING THE ranks of the retired on April 
1 were JAMES J. ROCHE (left), and 
JEROME P. DUBIN, who had more than 40 
years service each with CTA and its 
predecessor companies. 

JOHN BORK. Asst. Supt.. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 3-27-51 
ROBERT BROWN, Signal Maint., 

West Shops, Emp. 11-9-48 



JOHN CHWISTEK. Sr, Power Supv., 

Control Center, Emp. 8-23-48 
CHESTER CUDEK, B Electrician, 

West Shops, Emp. 7-12-45 
GREGORY DALY, Bus Repairer, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 3-3-49 
JEROME DUBIN, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 5-27-41 
JOSEPHINE FELDMAN, Clerk. 

Safety, Emp. 1-24-66 
GEORGE GEINS, Bus Repairer, 

77th Street, Emp. 8-11-47 
MICHAEL GILMARTIN, Box Puller, 

Lawndale, Emp. 2-16-48 
WILLIAM GRZESINSKI, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 2-10-47 
JAMES HICKS, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 2-26-52 
RAYMOND HOROSZKO. Box Puller, 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-11-45 
EDWARD KAMINSKl, Collector, 

Archer. Emp. 11-4-46 
EUGENE KILLIAN. Shopman I. 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 2-4-48 
JAMES LEE, Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp. 8-31-46 
JAMES MAJSZAK, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-2-51 



THOMAS MEAGHER, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-14-51 
ARTHUR MINES SR . Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 2-15-51 
CLARENCE PARKS, Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 6-21-51 
ARTHUR PETTY, Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 11-29-48 
JOHN PIETKO, Box Puller, 

Archer, Emp. 3-20-46 
JAMES ROCHE, Director, 

Utility, Emp. 9-22-37 
ALBERT SMITH, Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp. 10-20-60 
LEO TARGOSZ, Rail Clerk. 

Congress, Emp. 12-20-40 
ALGER YODUAL. Dynamometer Lab. 

South Shops, Emp. 3-1-47 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 

GEORGE HAMPER, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 3-27-61 
MELVIN LINDSEY JR., Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 1-16-56 



BERNARD ADAMS, 82, North Park, 

Emp. 11-4-25, Died 2-7-82 
AARON AUSTIN, 75. South Shops, 

Emp. 7-30-51, Died 1-16-82 
ROY BEAHAN, 68, South Shops, 

Emp. 11-29-40, Died 2-4-82 
PROBIE BROWN, 52, 69th Street, 

Emp. 5-8-78. Died 2-19-82 
JOSEPH CERVELLI, 64, South Shops. 

Emp. 5-1-46. Died 2-23-82 
WALTER CHRUSCIEL, 68, Beverly, 

Emp. 4-27-42, Died 2-15-82 
THOMAS DOWLNG, 88, 77th Street, 

Emp. 10-5-27, Died 2-10-82 
JOHN FEHLHABER, 62. Electrical, 

Emp. 9-9-45, Died 2-20-82 
CLARENCE GREENE, 41, West Section, 

Emp. 5-20-66, Died 3-14-82 
WILLIAM HEFFERNAN, 86, Transportation, 

Emp. 8-20-45, Died 2-2-82 
ANDREW HOBBS. 89. Transportation. 

Emp. 12-11-19. Died 1-31-82 



CARL JACKSON, 87, Electrical. 

Emp. 9-15-19. Died 1-15-82 
WALTER JEKOT, 57. Administrative Srvcs, 

Emp. 6-18-79. Died 2-26-82 
EUGENE JONES. 72. 52nd Street. 

Emp. 3-13-47. Died 2-20-82 
ARTHUR KRICKOW. 79, Transportation, 

Emp. 9-16-29. Died 2-5-82 
ANDREW KUSHMAN, 78. Transportation, 

Emp. 12-6-24. Died 2-12-82 
GEORGE KWIATKOWSKI. 62. South Shops, 

Emp. 3-29-78, Died 2-28-82 
DANIEL LEMERY, 71, 69th Street, 

Emp. 9-5-47, Died 2-2-82 
STEVE LOCIY, 69, Way & Structures, 

Emp. 11-16-30, Died 2-21-82 
LESTER LUDMAN, 93, Kedzie, 

Emp. 2-14-08, Died 1-28-82 
THOMAS McCORMACK, 65, West Section, 

Emp. 10-21-37. Died 2-19-82 
PETER MITCHELL. 83. Transportation, 

Emp, 7-20-23, Died 1-30-82 
JOSEPH ODDO, 69, Maintenance, 

Emp. 8-20-48, Died 2-12-82 



DENIS O'KEEFE, 84, 77th Street, 

Emp. 9-13-26, Died 2-13-82 
JOHN OTOOLE, 85, North Park, 

Emp. 3-2-27, Died 1-16-82 
JOSEPH OUELLETTE, 102. West Section, 

Emp. 7-24-42, Died 2-14-82 
JAMES PATTERSON, 88, Transportation, 

Emp 7-1-21, Died 2-16-82 
FRANCIS REGNIER, 87. Wilson, 

Emp. 3-12-23, Died 2-13-82 
PRESTON RIBOT. 81, South Section, 

Emp. 9-27-23, Died 12-24-81 
LOUIS RICCIARDI, 71, Congress, 

Emp. 1-17-49, Died 1-29-82 
JUAN SINCLAIR, 64. South Shops, 

Emp. 10-25-54, Died 2-20-82 
RAYMOND STRATTON, 71, General Office, 

Emp. 8-17-37, Died 2-18-82 
MARTIN SULLIVAN, 78, North Park, 

Emp. 6-21-27, Died 2-17-82 
ANDREW UNICOF, 83, Skokie Shop, 

Emp. 7-16-19, Died 2-6-82 
FRANK YESKiS, 78, Lawndale, 

Emp. 1-13-26, Died 2-13-82 



Service 
anniversaries 
in April 

40 years 



Benjamin Zentmyer 

Forest Glen 




35 years 



Frederick Dechon, South Shops 
Ulysses Jones, 77th Street 
Max Kuchan Jr., South Shops 
John Peresin, Maintenance 
Howard Ward, South Shops 



30 years 



Theodore Burnett, 77th Street 
Claude Burns, 77th Street 
Arthur Frazier, Archer 
Edward Head, 77th Street 
Dewey Hill, Ashland/95th 
Quinton James, Utility 
Oscar Johnson, Utility 
Randolph Lewis, 77th Street 
Margaret Roche, North Section 



25 years 



Carl Anderson, North Section 
James Beauford, Utility 
Edward Buckner, West Section 
Gerard Budzisz, North Park 
Leon Devore, Beverly 
James Hightower, Control Center 
Deborah Hillard, 77th Street 
Roger Hudson, 77th Street 
William McNally, West Section 
Edward McSweeney, Electrical 
Charles Nevels Jr., Howard 
Henry Radom, Forest Glen 
Lonnie Rupert, Beverly 
Clarence Shepard, District B 
Adrian Truitt, 77th Street 
Wayne Williams, District A 
Robert Wynne, Ashland/95th 



APRIL, 1982 



BUS 

no&sso 




Volunteer judges needed 
for Bus Roadeo events 

Non-operating CTA employees are being asked to participate as 
judges in the 1982 CTA Bus Roadeo garage level driving competi- 
tion slated for June 6 and June 13 starting at 8 a.m. at both 77th 
Street and Forest Glen garages. 

The events will include uniform inspection, pre-pullout check quiz, 
and driving competition. Winners from garage level competition held 
in June will compete in the final competition, which will be held July 
25, starting at 8 a.m. on the Soldier Field parking lot. 

Management, professional and other non-operating personnel 
wishing to volunteer as judges should contact Bill Mooney in the 
Merchandise Mart at ext. 4132, or Lonnie Hill in the training center 
at 477-1369, or 549-1540. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0, Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



Address Correction Reauested 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



DOCUMENTS' LIBRARIAN TN 

Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
iiVanston, IL 60201 




Mayor Byrne 
announces major 
transit improvemeiiis 

On Friday, May 7, Mayor Jane M. Byrne swung a sledge 
hammer at the Randolph/ Washington subway station, 
marking the start of the City's $53 million Subway Renova- 
tion Program; then rode in a new 2600-series rapid transit 
car to ceremonies dedicating the 47th Street station in 
memory of Black leader Roy Wilkins. 

In her remarks at the Subway Renovation Program ground- 
breaking, the Mayor said, "The existing subway stations were 
designed in the 1930's and have become outdated. This pro- 
gram will result in modern facilities with less noise at the plat- 
form level, better accessibility, and a more attractive environ- 
ment for subway users." (Stori; on page 8) 

After making the announcement, the Mayor boarded one 
of the Chicago Transit Authority's new 2600-series rapid 
transit cars for the ride to the 47th Street station. 

The CTA has purchased 600 cars from The Budd Com- 
pany of Philadelphia, 100 of which will be used along the 
O'Hare rapid transit extension. 

Thirty-two cars have been delivered, with an additional 
268 due by mid- 1984. The remaining 300 will be delivered 
by the end of 1986. 

The total cost of the 600 cars is $266.6 million, with the Ur- 
ban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) of the U.S. 
Department of Transportation providing 80 per cent of the 
funding and the Illinois Department of Transportation pro- 
viding the remainder. 

"These new climate-controlled cars will make commuting in 
extreme weather more comfortable for the hundreds of 
thousands of riders who use the CTA," Mayor Byrne said. 
"The cars will prove cost-effective, too, because they will not 
require the frequent and costly maintenance of the older cars 
they replace." 

(continued on page 8) 



Left: Mayor Jane M. Byrne rededicates the 
new 47th Street station on the North- 
South rapid transit route in honor of Roy 
Wilkins, former executive director of the 
National Association for the Advance- 
ment of Colored People. Joining in the 
ceremony are (from left): Commissioner 
Rev. Johnnie Colemon, Administrative 
Joint Commission; Alderman Tyrone Ken- 
ner, 3rd Ward; Bishop Lewis Ford, Pastor, 
St. Paul Church of God in Christ, and CTA 
Board Member Nick Ruggiero. 

Below: At the Lake/Randolph mezzanine 
in the State Street Subway, Commissioner 
Jerome Butler, City of Chicago, Depart- 
ment of Public Works, explains Subway 
Renovation Program. Others are (from 
left) RTA Chairman Lewis Hill; John 
Kramer, Secretary of Transportation, 
State of Illinois; CTA Chairman Michael 
Cardilli; Alderman Fred Roti, 1st Ward, 
and Mayor Byrne. 

Bottom: Mayor Byrne joins CTA Transpor- 
tation Manager James Blaa at the con- 
trols of 2600-series rapid transit train dur- 
ing inaugural run from State Street Sub- 
way to 47th Street station. 




FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

MAY, 1982 



Pilot program 
promotes safety 
consciousness 

A CTA garage-level pilot safety pro- 
gram designed to stimulate the active 
participation of operating and opera- 
tional support employees from the bus 
operator to the bus cleaner, is under- 
way at Limits garage. 

Cornerstone of the program is safe- 
ty consciousness. Every aspect of 
operating safely, from the garage to 
the street and back, is being examined 
for improvements as five teams, each 
consisting of about 50 operators, work 
toward a common goal--zero ac- 
cidents. The concept includes 
everything from vehicular and 
passenger safety to prevention of in- 
jury on duty (lOD). 

The pilot program for improving 
employee safety began in January 
with an aim toward maximum par- 
ticipation, and a message to 
employees that says, "You are a part 
of the decision-making process." 
Thus, the team concept was im- 
plemented. 

Spearheading this teamwork spirit is 
Transportation Manager James Blaa, 
whose high regard for employee and 
passenger safety encourages en- 
thusiastic employee participation and 
maximum safety awareness. Blaa's 
management team for this project in- 
cludes Edward Mitchell, Director, 
Utility/Training, and Elonzo Hill, 
Superintendent, Limits Training 
Center, coordinator of the pilot pro- 
gram 




Team 3, led by Raymond Gosha, is basking in recognition as winner of the March com- 
petition and overall winner for the first quarter. Members of the team (from left) are Cesar 
Lovera; Felicia Clower; Johnnie Lynch; Team Leader Gosha; Lem Newell; Bus Instructor 
Harvey Jones, advising instructor for Team 3; Jonathan Hulon; Faye Murry, alternate 
team leader; Annie Rice; Carmen Martinez; Calvin Brown, and Richard Goldman, 
Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 241 Board Member, and bus operator. 



Hill said employees are thrust into a 
competitive spirit as each team is pro- 
vided with a score sheet on which a 
gold star is awarded for each zero acci- 
dent day. The team with the lowest ac- 
cident./injury rate in a given month, 
most often the one with the biggest 
collection of gold stars, wins the 
monthly competition. The winning 
team collects the accolades in addition 
to a team plaque and a distinctive lapel 
pin for each individual team member. 



The quarterly winner will likewise 
receive a team plaque as well as a 
commemorative belt buckle for each 
individual member. 

Early indications that the new pro- 
gram will be beneficial at all garages, 
once it goes system-wide, is its 
measured success at Limits, where ac- 
cidents/injuries have continued to 
decline since the pilot safety program's 
inception, in January. Team 1, led by 
Wendell Edwards, took top honors 




The winning team for January, the first month in the safety pilot 
program at Limits, was appropriately Team 1. Acting Superintend- 
ent Clark Carter (left) assists Team Leader Wendell Edwards as 
the Employee Safety plaque is displayed for the first time. Others 
present for the occasion were (from left) Arthur Bennett, Training 
Center Instructor, and Board Member, ATU, Local 241; Harry Red- 
drick. Director, Transportation Personnel; Edward Mitchell, Direc- 
tor, Utility/Training; Richard Goldman, Bus Operator, Limits, and 
Board Member, ATU, Local 241; Elonzo Hill, Superintendent, 



Displaying the safety plaque as winners for February was Team 5, 
led by Operator Cleven Wardlow (left), who is assisted by 
Transportation Manager James Blaa. Others present (from left) 
were Harvey Jones, Bus Instructor; Bus Operators Frank James, 
John Terry, Vernon Barney, Henry Sams, Larry Goffer, and Martin 
Hautzinger, Box Puller. 

Limits Training Center, and Chairman, Safety Committee, and 
Transportation Manager James Blaa. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Product Innovation Award 

3M Company presented its "Product Innovation Award" to CTA for its innovative use of 
the company's poultry temperature gauge to detect overfieating in rapid transit car jour- 
nal bearings, an application introduced by Joseph Repplinger, retired CTA Maintenance 
{Manager. Making the award presentation is Duane Windahl (left), 3M Marketing Director. 
Accepting the plaque on behalf of CTA is Jim Pankonen (second from left), Director, 
Systems Assurance, and CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli. The story about the gauges was 
published in the November, 1981 issue of Transit News. 



with only six accidents, while the 
February winner was Team 5, led by 
eleven Wardlow. with only four ac- 
cidents. 

In March, competition stiffened as 
Team 3, led by Raymond Gosha, 
tallied only two accidents and col- 
lected the honors. Hill said this new 
accident low was the best safety record 
for the month of March in Limits' 
history. 

Limits volunteers in this project, all 
team leaders, have taken an extra step 
to assure success of the new safety 
awareness effort. In their free time, 
they are engaged in a workshop where 
they are becoming more 
knowledgeable about the aspects of 
safety, and studying safety im- 
provements. 

A committee comprised of team 
leaders, their alternates, repre- 
sentatives of Amalgamated Transit 
Union, Local 241; Transportation Per- 
sonnel, the Transportation Safety 
Unit, and Transportation Instruction, 
meet monthly to consider recommen- 
dations for improved safety measures 
which could affect employees, 
passengers, and Limits garage in 
general. Ultimately, the success of this 
pilot safety program will have a bear- 
ing on the program's implementation 



at other garages. 

Bus operators selected by their 
teams as leaders are: Wendell Ed- 
wards. Team 1; Giles Liddell, Team 2; 
Raymond Gosha, Team 3; Robert 
Kelly, Team 4: Cleven Wardlow. 
Team 5. Advisors are Arthur Bennett, 
Training Center Instructor and a 
member of ATU 241 Board: Harvey 
Jones. Owen Boothroyd. and John 
Hoff. Instructors. Limits garage. 

Other committee members are: 
Elonzo Hill, chairman (Superin- 
tendent. Limits Training Center); Paul 
Kadowaki. Superintendent, Bus In- 
struction; Claude Stevens and Fren- 
chie Ellis, Principal Safety Analysts, 
Transportation department; Clark 
Carter. Acting Superintendent, Limits 
garage; Mike Lacriola, Superin- 
tendent. North Avenue garage: 
Melvin Link, Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Bus Instruction/North; 
William Thompson, Assistant 
Superintendent, Bus Instruc- 
tion/South; Norman Herron, As- 
sistant Superintendent, Limits Train- 
ing Center; Louis Sanford, Budget 
Coordinator, Transportation depart- 
ment; James Ward, Foreman, Limits 
Maintenance department, and 
Richard Goldman, Bus Operator and 
ATU 241 Board member. 



From the 
Chairman 

Cominitnient 



On Friday. May 7. Mayor Byrne 
demonstrated her commitment, and 
the commitment of the City of 
Chicago, to insure that CTA will con- 
tinue to provide the best possible 
transit service for the people of 
Chicago, by announcing three major 
transit improvements— the Subway 
Renovation Program, the new 
2600-series rapid transit cars, and the 
remodeled Roy Wilkins Memorial 
(47th Street) 'L' station. 

Since 1943. our subways have done 
an excellent job of serving the transit 
needs of the Central Business District. 
The Subway Renovation Program will 
update CTA's subway stations in accor- 
dance with contemporary standards of 
accessibility, safety, comfort, and ap- 
pearance. The 2600-series rapid transit 
cars will provide more rider comfort and 
require less maintenance than the 
6000-series cars that they will replace. 
And the rebuilt 'L' station at 47th Street 
provides a much-needed modern facility 
by replacing a station that was built in 
1892. 

In addition, excellent progress is be- 
ing made on the construction of the 
O'Hare Extension [Transit News, April 
'82) and other capital improvement 
projects. 

These improvements clearly 
demonstrate the City's commitment to 
provide CTA with the best possible 
facilities and equipment to serve the 
transit needs of our riders. To maximize 
the value of the improved facilities and 
equipment, aH CTA employees must 
make their own commitment to perform 
their duties in an outstanding manner, 
and dedicate themselves to serving the 
needs of our riders. 

As a result of strict line-item 
budgeting, every CTA employee now 
has an important job to perform. I 
stress to you that every employee is 
expected to perform his or her job in a 
competent, thorough, and dedicated 
manner, and that every supervisory 
employee is expected to set high levels 
of performance requirements and in- 
sure that those performance levels are 
maintained by employees. 

The City of Chicago has 
demonstrated its commitment to pro- 
vide CTA with the tools needed to 
provide excellent transit service. We 
must now demonstrate our commit- 
ment by providing the best transit ser- 
vice possible. 



MAY, 1982 



Heroic action 

Bus Operator James Washington 
recently displayed outstanding 
heroism through his adroit handling of 
a nervous young gunman on his 87th 
Street bus. On April 14, 60 riders fled 
Washington's bus when a 15-year-old 
youth brandished a pistol while fend- 
ing off an attack by four other young 
men. Washington took the .25 caliber 
blue steel pistol from the youth and 
later turned the youth over to the 
custody of Chicago Police. 
Washington, 34, has been a CTA 
employee since 1972. 



Bus Operator James Washington (left) 
receives congratulations for his act of 
heroism and a "Funtastic 1982" gift 
coupon book from McClinfon Porter, Act- 
ing Area Superintendent, Far South. 





New power/ 
rail controllers 



Three rail controllers In the Control 
Center who completed six months of on- 
the-job training for power controller posi- 
tions display achievement awards. The 
three, now titled power/rail controllers, 
are OIlie Winston (left), William Nichols 
(center), and John Nimtz. With them are 
James Blaa (far right), Manager, Transpor- 



tation department, and Michael LaVelle, 
Director of Service, Transportation depart- 
ment. The three are the first group of rail 
controllers to be certified for the 
power/rail controller position, and they 
will monitor and direct supervisory control 
of electrical power sources for CTA's en- 
tire rapid transit system. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Surprised and elated, Bus Instructor Joe Birmingham receives congratulations from 
Transportation Manager James Blaa (left) and a $3,700 suggestion award cfieck from 
William Piatt, Director, Job Classification. 

Transportation suggestion 
earns a top prize 



A suggestion netting CTA salary 
and maintenance costs savings, and 
improved late-night service along the 
No. 104 Pullman route, earned a 
$3,700 cash prize for Bus Instructor 
Joe Birmingham of Beverly garage. 

The award, presented by Transpor- 
tation Manager James Blaa, was the 
largest suggestion cash prize ever 
received by a member of the 
Transportation department, and the 
second largest award in the history of 
the Suggestion program at CTA. 

A surprised Birmingham told Blaa 
that he thought the two ChicagoFest 
tickets which he received last summer 
were all he could expect for his sug- 
gestion. The Suggestion Committee 
was still reviewing his money-saving 
idea at that time. 

The 23-year CTA employee sug- 
gested eliminating one of two night 
buses on the Pullman route and hav- 
ing the remaining bus schedule coin- 
cide with train arrivals at 95th Street 
and the Dan Ryan. 

Under the previous operation, 
buses ran from 95th Street to the Dan 
Ryan, 115th Street, and Cottage 
Grove Avenue. Birmingham said a 
round trip in this case would take 24 
minutes with an 18-minute layover at 
95th Street. "Just to go a distance of 
23 blocks, the bus had more layover 



time than actual running time," said 
Birmingham. 

Under his suggestion with changes 
in the train schedules, one run was 
eliminated for owl service, and the re- 
maining run's schedule coincides with 
train arrivals. 

"The suggestion is so simple, it's 
surprising that no one ever thought of 
it before," said Edward Mitchell, Direc- 
tor, Utility /Training. "What is even 
more gratifying," added Mitchell, "is to 
know that people in our Training area 
are going beyond the call of duty and 
coming up with great ideas which pay 
off. The Training area is the tieart of 
Transportation," he said. 

Others on hand to congratulate Bir- 
mingham for his suggestion award 
were Robert Desvignes, Area 
Superintendent of Instruction; Paul 
Kadowaki, Superintendent, Bus In- 
struction; William Thompson, Assis- 
tant Superintendent, Bus Instruc- 
tion/South, and William C. Piatt, 
Director, Job Classification. 

Birmingham, an Instructor at Bever- 
ly since 1978, said his suggestion 
came after Transportation manage- 
ment asked employees to look for 
ways to cut costs wherever possible. 
"This looked like a good place to 
start," said Birmingham. 



Law for today 



Q. I put up storm windows last 
year and filed for the energy 
conservation tax credit on my 
tax return. If I install insula- 
tion this year, can I use the tax 
credit again or is it a one-time 
credit? 

A. Under federal law you are entitled 
to use the credit any time between 
April 20, 1977, and December 31. 
1985. You may spend up to 
$2,000 over this period resulting in 
an actual tax reduction of up to 
$300. If part of it was used for the 
storm windows, the remainder 
may be used for insulation or some 
other appropriate purpose until all 
of the $300 is used up. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 



Q. Is there relief available for an 
employee who suffers sexual 
harassment on the job? 

A. Yes. Both federal and Illinois state 
law forbid sexual harassment 
where there is a connection be- 
tween the sexual advance and an 
employment decision. For exam- 
ple, a claim exists if an employee is 
terminated or refused a promotion 
because he or she has refused to 
acquiesce in the sexual advances 
of a supervisor. 

• - Illinois State Bar Association 



Q. I just received a moped for my 
birthday. Do I have to wear 
goggles, or a helmet, or any 
other protective gear? 

A. While the law may not require pro- 
tective gear, the individual should use 
common sense to insure safety. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 



Q. My ex-husband just died. His 
will, executed during our mar- 
riage, left his house to me, and 
it had not been changed since 
our divorce. Am I entitled to 
the house? 

A. No. Dissolution of your marriage 
had the effect of revoking every 
legacy, interest or power of ap- 
pointment given to you in the will. 
- - Illinois State Bar Association 



Submit questions to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield, IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in columns 
Personal answers not possible.) 



MAY, 1982 



William Boehm (Forest Glen 
garage) was the operator of a 
#56 Milwaukee bus ridden by 
Dorothy Warno, of Summer- 
dale Avenue. "At Addison, a 
large group of high school 
pupils boarded the bus, went 
to the rear, became loud and 
obnoxious, and filled the bus 
with cigarette smoke. Your 
driver immediately stopped 
the bus and took control of 
the rowdies. The situation 
could easily have gotten out 
of control with all the shoving 
and yelling that was going on 
■ except for the action taken 
by the driver. He was not 
about to ignore these 
hoodlums and leave the other 
riders to their mercy." 




John McBroom Jr. (West Sec- 
tion) won the approval of 
Kevin Sherman, of Kasson 
Avenue, for the way he han- 
dled his duties as conductor 
of a Jefferson Park train. "His 
on-the-job performance could 
set a very good example for 
other employees. He an- 
nounces all stops clearly, col- 
lects all fares, and ap- 
proaches his job with obvious 
enthusiasm and responsibili- 
ty. There is an added sense of 
security and service when 
one is around an employee of 
such caliber. An employee 
who is such an asset to the 
Chicago Transit Authority 
deserves appropriate 
recognition." 



commendation corner 



Louis Montgomery (North Avenue garage) was com- 
plimented by Vi Schausten, of North Leavitt Street, a 
regular rider on his #77 Belmont bus. "He is always neat- 
appearing, courteous and polite, and always has a pleasant 
disposition. When people transfer from other buses, he 
waits for them. In inclement weather, the passengers surely 
appreciate this courtesy. This driver is a credit to CTA, and I 
personally wish there were more like him. CTA is my sole 
means of transportation, and 1 feel I am qualified to judge 
what makes an excellent bus driver and what doesn't." 



Robert Thomas (North Park garage) is "one truly pro- 
fessional bus driver," according to Mary McAllister, of 
Marine Drive, a rider on his #146 Marine/Michigan Express 
bus. "He is courteous, pleasant and observant, and won't 
pull away from the curb when a passenger is three feet 
away. He is a careful driver, and brings his bus close to the 
curb when passengers are alighting or boarding. As we leave 
the bus, he reminds us to watch our step and often wishes us 
a good day. This driver usually keeps his schedule, moving 
right along at a steady pace, without jerking or weaving. He 
is an excellent operator," 



Al Towns (77th Street garage) was praised "for the 
wonderful service he is rendering" on his #4 Cottage Grove 
bus by Hattie Wallace, of Evans Avenue. "He called the 
streets as they used to in days gone by. Many people ride 
the bus who are not familiar with the city. Many passengers 
were crowded at the front, the elderly and lame standing. 
The driver kindly asked them to take seats in the rear so the 
crippled and elderly could sit down near the front door, and 
they did. I already had a seat. (I am over 90.) I know you 
appreciate knowing there are some very fine drivers." 



David Copeland (Lawndale garage) was appreciated by 

Lucille Whitworth. of East 32nd Street, for his "consistent, 
courteous conduct" while operating a #12 Roosevelt bus. 
"This man attempts in a most courteous manner to maintain 
proper passenger decorum at all times by seeing to it that the 
rules are followed, such as no smoking, drinking, swearing 
or illegally entering the vehicle. To me, this is a display not 
only of the respect this man has for his job, but also of the 
respect he has for his passengers." 



Rhonda Berry (Limits garage) impressed Lynda Elkins, 
of East Scott Street, with the way she operated a #125 
Water Tower Express bus. "She created a community at- 
mosphere on the bus. asking other passengers to help 
change a dollar bill, clearly explaining directions, and assur- 
ing older riders they would reach their destinations. She was 
helpful and pleasant. Absentmindedly. I left my purse on 
the bus. That afternoon I called the (Limits) garage and 
found out that she had turned in the purse. Nice people 
make a big difference. Hats off to Rhonda Berry - a great 
human being." 



Willie James (North Park garage) was commended by 
Gerri Norington. of Ainslie Street, for his courtesy on a 
#151 Sheridan bus. "1 was pleasantly greeted by the driver. 
Since I sat near the front, I heard him extend pleasantries to 
every passenger entering or exiting the bus. He called out 
every stop and cautioned each passenger to watch his step. I 
was truly taken by his cordial attitude. Upon exiting, 1 
observed the driver's number and noticed he was a line in- 
structor. It's easy to understand how he attained his posi- 
tion. He is a credit to the CTA and a perfect example for 
trainees." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees honored with a *Day in CTA' 



A rail conductor and two bus 
operators were honored by the 
Transportation department last month 
for valiant rescue action. 

The alert action of Conductor Linda 
Ray is credited with saving the life of a 
passenger who had fallen between rail 
cars after alighting from a northbound 
North-South train at Wilson station. 

Ms. Ray signaled the motorman to 
stop the train, pulled the emergency 
cord, and called the Control Center in 
the Merchandise Mart to turn the 
power off. She then assisted members 
of the Fire Department as they re- 
moved the man from beneath the 
train. 

Ms. Ray received the accolades of 
the Transportation department as an 
honored guest on 'A Day in CTA.' 
She was presented a certificate of ap- 
preciation by Transportation Manager 
James Blaa, and was given a tour of 
the general office facilities. 

Other honorees on 'A Day in CTA' 
were Bus Operators Fred Williams 
and Willie Smith of the 69th Street 




"Day in CTA" honorees Linda Ray, Willie Smith, and Fred Williams proudly display 
special recognition certificates in the CTA Control Center. 



garage, who recovered an elderly 
woman's purse which had been 
snatched by a man as the woman 



waited at a bus stop. The incident was 
reported in the March issue of Transit 
News. 



Thanks — for a job well done 



Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 



Amparo Alvarez, Forest Glen 
Willie Arrington, North Park 

Carl Baumgartner, North Park 
Jesse Bolian, North Park 
Dwayne Borom, Limits 
Freddie Bradford, 77th Street 
Janet Burton, North Park 

Fred Caldwell, Lawndale 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Earl Carson, North Park 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
George Collins, Forest Glen 
Marvin Covington, Limits 
Mary Crenshaw, North Park 

Milan Davidovic, North Park 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Robert Duslak, Forest Glen 

Eugene Embry, Ashland Terminal 
Arnold Emery, Limits 

John Gibson, Forest Glen 



John Harris, Lawndale 
Judy Haynes, 77th Street 
Charles Henderson, Maintenance 
Ignacio Hernandez, Archer 

Michael Jackson, 69th Street 
Lambert Jacobs Jr., Forest Glen 
Willie James, North Park 
Alfred Jordan, Archer 

Robert Kremer, North Park 

Robert Lemke, Forest Glen 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Brenda Lloyd, Ashland Terminal 
Katie Lowe, 52nd Street 

William Mandeldove Jr., 

Forest Glen 
Daniel Martin, Forest Glen 
Edsel Martin, Foster Shop 
Julio Martinez, North Park 
J. McClendon, Lawndale 
Charles McGee, Archer 
George Michko, 77th Street 



Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Donnell Prater, North Park 

Kenneth Richards, 52nd Street 
Eugenio Rivera, North Avenue 

Edward Schnitzius, Forest Glen 
Joseph Snead Jr., Forest Glen 
Cornelio Soto, North Park 
Leo Stern, North Park 
Harold Stingley Jr., 
Douglas/Congress 

Delois Turner, West Section 

Darnell Williams, 77th Street 
Thester Winston, Forest Glen 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 



MAY. 1982 




Mayor Byrne announces start 
of Subway Renovation Program 



Mayor Byrne announced the start of the City's Subway 
Renovation Program on Friday, May 7, beginning a pro- 
gram that also included her inaugural ride on CTA's new 
2600-series rapid transit cars, and a rededication of the 47th 
Street 'L' station in honor of Black leader Roy Wilkins. (See 
start; on page 1) 

The Subway Renovation Program, encompassing both 
the State and Dearborn Street Subways, includes the con- 
tinuous platforms on State between Lake and Congress and 



Transit improvements 

(continued from page 1) 

Upon arrival at the 47th Street station, the Mayor unveiled a 
plaque, dedicating the station to Roy Wilkins, former executive 
director of the National Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People. The Mayor said, "Mr. Wilkins served 
throughout his lifetime in the cause of human rights and the 
fight against racial discrimination. He will always be 
remembered for his outstanding leadership and dedication in 
the promulgation of civil rights for all mankind." 

The new 47th Street station on the CTA's North-South 
(Englewood-Jackson Park-Howard) rapid transit route has 
been rebuilt at a cost of more than $1 million. The original 
station was built in 1892. 



on Dearborn between Randolph and Van Buren; the 14 
mezzanines along these platforms (Lake/Randolph, Ran- 
dolph/Washington, Washington/Madison, Madison/ 
Monroe, Monroe/Adams, Adams/ Jackson, Jackson/Van 
Buren, and Van Buren /Congress on State and Ran- 
dolph/Washington through Jackson/Van Buren on Dear- 
born); the two pedestrian passageways connecting the State 
and Dearborn mezzanines at Randolph/Washington and 
Adams/ Jackson, and the two pedestrian transfer tunnels 
linking the State and Dearborn platforms at Washington 
Street and Jackson Boulevard. In addition, mezzanines and 
platforms will be renovated at Chicago, Grand, Harrison, 
and Roosevelt on State and the Lake Transfer and 
LaSalle/Congress stations on Dearborn. 

The proposed improvements will focus upon the three major 
features of this system: station mezzanines, platform 
areas, and the pedestrian passageways. At all mezzanines, the 
existing facilities will be stripped back to their basic structural 
shell and completely renovated. New fare collection 
facilities, lighting, wall surface, flooring, artwork, and column 
coverings will be installed. A uniform system of signage and 
maps will be provided and facilities for the enhancement of 
passenger security will be incorporated. Amenities such as 
telephones and concession areas will also be provided as ap- 
propriate. The existing stairways and escalators from the street 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Artist's concept of Randolph/Washington Mezzanine Station at 
Dearborn Street. (Courtesy of Mayor's Office) 



to the mezzanine will be improved to increase the accessibility 
and passenger handling capacity of the stations. 

At the platform level, new lighting, flooring, wall, ceiling, 
and column treatments will be provided to upgrade station 
aesthetics. Wall murals and other artwork will be incor- 
porated wherever feasible, while sound absorption devices 
and materials will help to control noise levels. Stairways and 
escalators from the platforms to the mezzanines will be 
replaced or renovated in kind. Signage, maps, benches, 
and concession facilities will be compatible with those 
developed for the mezzanine. 

In the four pedestrian facilities extending from the State 
Street and Dearborn Subway, installation of new floors, 
decorative walls, acoustical ceiling treatment, indirect lighting, 
and murals will considerably upgrade the appearance. 

Actual subway renovation construction will begin on 
Tuesday, May 25, at the fare control mezzanine levels of the 
Randolph/Washington stations on both the State Street and 
Dearborn Street Subways. 

During construction, passengers who enter the subway at 
Randolph/Washington on the Dearborn line will be able to 
use either the Washington/Madison or Lake Transfer/Clark 
stations. On the State Street line, passengers can use the 
Washington/Madison or Lake/Randolph stations. In all 
cases, the extra walk will be no more than a half -block. 



Mayor Byrne stressed that although there will be minor in- 
conveniences to CTA passengers, the improvements have 
been needed for a long time. 

Design work is nearing completion on five additional sta- 
tion mezzanines, with construction scheduled to start in the 
near future. These include: Adams/ Jackson on both the 
State and Dearborn lines; Madison/Washington on the 
Dearborn line, and the Chicago station and Roosevelt sta- 
tion on the State Street line. Work on the Chicago and 
Roosevelt stations also includes the platform level. The'en- 
tire Subway Renovation Program, including mezzanines, 
platforms, pedestrian passageways, and transfer tunnels is 
scheduled for completion in 1987. 

In her remarks at the groundbreaking ceremony. Mayor 
Byrne noted that the Loop 'L' Rehabilitation Program will 
also get underway this year. "The subway renovation pro- 
gram, together with the rehabilitation of the Loop 'L,' will 
greatly enhance the quality of public transportation in 
downtown Chicago," she stated. 

Current estimates indicate that the cost of the entire Sub- 
way Renovation Program will be $53 million, funded par- 
tially by the Interstate Transfer Program. Contractor for the 
subway work is Pora Construction Company. 



MAY, 1982 



CTA at work 

Quality control is their specialty 



In a popular Broadway musical 
about the world of business, a mythical 
corporation manufactures "widgets." 
If that widget maker ever tried to sell 
his product to CTA for use in its buses, 
he'd probably run into William T. (Bill) 
Haworth and his staff of steely-eyed 
technicians, who would give the prof- 
fered product the once-over a couple 
of times. 

Haworth is Supervisor of Technical 
Services-Bus in the Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance depart- 
ment. He and his staff test and record 
results of all new bus products submit- 
ted to CTA by manufacturers. 

Through the use of VMS, QBE, and 
SAS computer systems, data can be 
analyzed, trends recognized which will 
trigger corrective action, and projec- 
tions made as to future material and 
manpower requirements for items 
under study. 

Haworth's staff includes Dennis 
Millicevic, Senior Technical Services 
Engineer; Willie Torres and Tom 
Kohler, Technical Services Engineers: 
Jim Haworth, Improvements 
Engineer; Jerry Killman, Technical 
Services Technician; Bob O'Donley 



and Don Tarnowski, Technicians; 
Walter Paszyma, Technician/Drafts- 
man; Bob Kiehn, Materials Inspector, 
and Mary Gallon, Shop Clerk. 

"When the warranty processing task 
was assumed by our group in 1975, it 
dealt almost exclusively with new bus 
warranties," Haworth said. 

"This task has now grown to include 
all new equipment, such as trucks, 
automobiles and utility equipment, as 
well as units rebuilt by outside con- 
tractors." 

The Technical Services — Bus area is 
located in the South Shops. There, 
the staff uses a wide variety of elec- 
trical and mechanical testing equip- 
ment to run new and rebuilt products 
through a series of "torture" tests to 
determine their ability to withstand 
hard use in daily bus operations or in 
workshops throughout CTA. 

"Engineering and technical 
assistance is required by the Equip- 
ment Engineering and Maintenance 
department on a now-time basis as op- 
posed to project type engineering." 
Haworth said. 

"A recent example would be a prob- 
lem which was being experienced with 



engine rebuild stands. The heavy 
diesel engine would unexpectedly turn 
in the stand and could have caused a 
serious injury to a mechanic. 

"The stand's manufacturer would 
not provide any assistance in redesign- 
ing modifications. So we did it in- 
shop, and the safety problem was 
eliminated. Without the immediate ac- 
tions of our engineers, the entire 
engine rebuild line might have been 
shut down for an extended period," 
Haworth said. 

"Within the past few years, the 
amount of rebuilding of CTA equipment 
by outside contractors has increased 
tremendously. The task of monitoring 
this work for quality and specifications 
compliance has placed heavy demands 
on our staff," he continued. 

"Along with this, the contracts 
themselves must be monitored to in- 
sure that the Authority is getting what 
it is paying for. 

"Vendor billing errors amounting to 
more than $200,000 on engine and 
transmission contracts were identified 
by our staff, and appropriate action 
was taken by CTA." Haworth said. 

The staff also conducts inspections 




Jerry Killman, Technical Services Technician, tests alarmastat 
which alerts bus operator with a dash mounted red light that the 
bus's engine is overheating and the engine should be turned off. 



Bob Kiehn, Materials Inspector, uses outside micrometer to 
measure exact dimension of brake drum submitted for approval 
by a contractor for CTA consideration. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



of more than 500 items for replace- 
ment on buses and equipment used in 
the repair shops of the 10 bus garages. 

These inspections are requested by 
storeroom personnel, mechanics, and 
repairmen who find replacement parts 
that do not meet specifications or who 
report that new replacement parts 
wear out more quickly than specified 
in warranties. These requests are 
made through the garage 
superintendents, who call in 
Haworth's technicians. 

To help standardize work per- 
formed throughout all 10 garages, 
Haworth's staff also helps in writing 
engineering modification bulletins. 
These bulletins help insure that the 
quality of repair work remains at a 
high level. 

The quality of the work performed 
by Haworth's staff is known 
throughout the industry. In fact, many 
bus part manufacturers send pro- 
totypes of equipment to Haworth's 
South Shops headquarters for testing. 

If the manufacturers don't get a 
good report on the product, then it's 
back to the drawing board. 




Willie Torres, Technical Services Engineer, tests bus air conditioning compressor for 
cause of failure on test stand that Torres designed. 




Tom Kohler, Technical Services Engineer, tests fluorescent light 
power pacl(. The test stand turns power on for 10 seconds, stays 
off for 20 seconds, and continually repeats to determine lifetime 
of power pacl(. 



William T. Haworth, Supervisor, Technical Services ■ Bus, in- 
spects transmission housing repaired by a contractor to deter- 
mine the quality of the contractor's work. 



MAY, 1982 



Retirements 



Anne Zahumensky 

Anne R. Zahumensky, Supervisor, Central 
Personnel Records, retired May 1 after 39 
years of service. An open house was held 
in her honor at the Merchandise Mart April 
16, where Miss Zahumensky received her 
retirement packet from William Piatt Sr., 
Director, Job Classification. Preparing to 
cut the cake at the open house are (from 
left) Maria Lopez, Clerk II; Anne Zahumen- 
sky; William Piatt, and Sue Mucha, Salary 
Administration Clerk. Miss Zahumensky 
organized the CTA's current Central Per- 
sonnel Records section of more than 
25,000 records from employee files of all 
of CTA's predecessor companies. 



William Piatt Sr. 

More than 200 friends and co-workers at- 
tended a retirement reception, held in the 
CIA Board Room April 23, honoring 
William Piatt Sr., who retired May 1 after 
42 years of service with CTA and Chicago 
Surface Lines. Piatt began his career in 
1939 as a clerk with CSL, and he was ap- 
pointed Director, Job Classification, in 
1977. Congratulating Piatt were (left to 
right) Fran Knautz, Dave Flynn, Bill 
Ashley, General Finance Manager Paul 
Kole, Piatt, Art Malmquist, Pete Meinardi, 
Jack Mardy, and Jesse Rodriguez. All but 
Kole are CTA retirees. Piatt lives in 
Evergreen Park and has four sons and six 
grandchildren. His retirement plans in- 
clude traveling with his fiance, Kaye 
Brunke. 



Anthony DiGiovanni 

On April 29 the Materials Management 
department celebrated the retirement of 
Order Control Clerk Anthony DiGiovanni 
(front, second from right) marking the end 
of his outstanding 34-year career in 
Materials Management, where he began 
working as an Assistant Stock Clerk in 
1948. Family members on hand were (from 
left) his granddaughter, Denise, his wife, 
Marie, and his daughter, Laurie. Express- 
ing appreciation for DiGiovanni's work 
were (from left) Ed Tobin, Acting Manager, 
Materials Management/Purchasing 
Agent; Vic Johnson, Superintendent, Data 
Processing/Office Administration; Bill 
Roman, Director, Stores, and James Reil- 
ly, Unit Supervisor, Inventory Operations. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



For i;our benefit 

How your retirement allowance is calculated 



A Retirement Allowance is calculated by, first, averaging an 
employee's four (4) highest earning years of the preceding 
ten (10) years. 



Example 1 






Pension 


Year 


Earnings 


1972 


$12,000.00 


1973 


14,000.00 


1974 


16,000.00 


1975 


18,000.00 


1976 


20,000.00 


1977 


22,000.00 



Year 

1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 



Pension 
Earnings 

$ 24,000.00 

26,000.00 

28,000.00 

^n nnn no 

$108,000.00 



$27,000.00 
Average Annual Earnings 



Next, the Average Annual Earnings is multiplied by 1% 
and the product is multiplied by the employee's full years of 
"Past Service" (i.e. service with the Authority prior to 
June 1, 1949). 

Employees with Chicago Motor Coach service affiliated with 
Local #1381 use 1/1/51, not affiliated use 1/1/52. 

Example 2 

Employee hired June 1, 1948 

(without Chicago Motor Coach Service) = 1 Year Past Ser- 



$27,000.00 

Average 
Annual 
Earnings 



1 

Full year(s) 
Past Service 



= $270.00 



Next, the Average Annual Earnings is multiplied by 
1.50% (IV2) and the product is multiplied by the years and 
months of "Future Service" (i.e. service with the Authority 
after June 1, 1949). 

Example 3 



Employee hired June 1, 1948 

Retirement Date June 1. 1982 = 



33 Years Future Service 



$27,000.00 

Average 
Annual 
Earnings 



X 1.50% X 



33.0000 

Full Year(s) 
& Months of 
Future Ser- 
vice 



= $13,365.00 



The combined total of Past and Future Service Credit is 
not to exceed 60% of the Average Annual Earnings. 



Example 4 

$27,000.00 

Average 
Annual 
Earnings 

$27,000.00 

Average 
Annual 
Earnings 



X 1.50% X 



Full Year(s) 
Past Service 



33.0000 

Full Year(s) 
& Months of 
Future Ser- 
vice 



= $270.00 



= $13,365.00 



Combined Credit $1 3,635.00 

Maximum allowable 60% of 27,000.00 = $16,200.00 

(If applicable an Early Retirement reduction of 5% per year 
for every year an employee is under age 65 is subtracted 
from the combined credit. The Early Retirement reduction 
does not apply if an employee has 30 or more years of ser- 
vice or if the sum of an employee's age plus years of service 
total 90 or more points. Those employees who cannot 
satisfy either criteria must meet the minimum retirement 
eligibility which is 55 years of age and three (3) years of ser- 
vice.) 

Finally, the combined credit is divided by twelve (12) to ob- 
tain the gross monthly benefit. 



Example 5 

Combined Credit 
Gross Monthly Benefit 



13,635.00 -5- 12 
=$1,136.25 



If you have any questions concerning this process, please 
contact the Pension section by phone at 929-8232. 

Beginning with the June issue of Transit News, the CTA 
Pension section will run a series entitled "How To Use Your 
Pension To Protect Your Survivors." This series of three ar- 
ticles will focus in on the various survivorship options 
available to active CTA employees approaching retirement. 

The first article will discuss the Pre-Retirement Option. This 
article will explain what the Pre-Retirement Option covers 
and how it's elected. The second article will discuss the Post- 
Retirement Survivorship Option. Options A & B will be ex- 
plained in detail along with the actuarial reduction related to 
each election. The third and final article of the series will 
compare the Pre-Retirement Option to the Post-Retirement 
Option. This article will point out the basic differences be- 
tween the two options. Hopefully, this series will prove to be 
beneficial. 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



YOUR NAME. 



OLD ADDRESS. 



NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box . 



City, state, and Zip Code 



Mail to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Mercliandise Mart, Cliicago, IL 60654. 



CTA PENSIONERS 

Do not send in this form. 
See notice on back cover. 



73 




Congratulations to the 77th Street "Streakers." CTA's 1982 basketball champs! Seated 
(left to right): Tyrone Brown, Ulysses Crockett, Michael Lambert, Wallace "Hondo" 
Howard, and Eugene Tate. Standing (left to right): John Riouse, Paul Campbell, Renardo 
Coleman, William Ball, Clarence "Rick James" Davis, and Coach John Ross. Other team 
members not shown in photo are Allen C. Smith III and Assistant Coach Milton Harris. 

77th Street 'Streakers' 

win Basketball Championship 



In recent playoff action, the 77th 
Street "Streakers" defeated North 
Avenue by a score of 73-51 to become 
CTA's basketball champs. John 
Riouse of the "Streakers" was named 
Most Valuable Player in the cham- 
pionship game. 

In the consolation game, the Rail 
Star "Panthers" outscored the 
Northside 'L' "Blazers", 68-57. 

The top four teams in the American 
League and the top four teams in the 
National League, based on end-of- 
scason standings (shown in box), 
competed in the championship tour- 
nament. 

Other year-end honors are as 
follows: 



Coach of the Year honors are 
shared by Paul Phillips and Dusty 

Wright, who coached North Park's 
"Running Hot," the Most Im- 
proved Team. 

The Season Scoring Title was 
won by Clarence "Rick James" 
Davis of the "Streakers." who scored 
340 points during the regular season, 
an average of 21.2 points per game. 

Most Points in One Game 
honors went to Paul Phillips of 
North Park's "Running Hot." He 
scored 43 points in a single game. And 
the Most Points in a Playoff Game 
(37 points) were scored by Mike Ew- 
ing of the Rail Star "Panthers." 



NEW PENSIONERS 



CTA 308/241 Basketball League Final Stand 


ings 




American League 


W-L 


National League 


W-L 




1. General Office 


13-3 .812 


1. Panthers 


14-2 


.875 


2. Northside 'L' 


11-5 .687 


2. North Avenue 


12-4 


.750 


3. 77th Street 


11-5 .687 


3. 69th Street 


8-8 


.500 


4. Running Hot 


10-6 .625 


4. North Park 


6-10 


.375 


5. Westside 'L' 


2-14 .125 


5. Limits 


4-12 


.250 


6. Rebels 


2-14 .125 


6. South Shops 


3-13 


.187 




JOINING THE ranks of the retired on May 
1 were WILLIAM PLATT (left), and 
ROBERT NEALY, who had more than 40 
years service each with CTA and its 
predecessor companies. 

LEROY ANDERSON. Rail Janitor, 

Maint., Emp. 7-22-50 
JOSEPH ANTHONY. Operator, 

Beverly. Emp. 6-16-60 
STERLING BOLTON. Operator. 

North Avenue, Emp 3-4-63 
CLAUDE BURNS, Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 4-18-52 
JOSEPH CIRINO. Lineman, 

West Shops, Emp, 2-12-48 
IGNACIO CRUZ, Bus Servicer. 

North Avenue. Emp. 1-27-71 
DANIEL DeBUONO, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-21-47 
ANTHONY DiGIOVANNl, Ord. Cntrl. Clk, II. 

Materials Mgmt , Emp. 1-28-48 
GEORGE DUSZYNSKL Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 12-3-45 



WILLIAM ALBRO. 80. Limits, 

Emp 5-15-25, Died 3-24-82 
ELI APRIL, 77, North Section. 

Emp 9-19-45. Died 3-2-82 
STEPHEN BAGROWSKl, 79, Schedule, 

Emp. 5-3-26. Died 3-16-82 
CLEMENS BART, 68, North Avenue, 

Emp 7-24-41, Died 3-27-82 
JAMES BRENNAN, 82, South Section, 

Emp 1-10-36, Died 3-13-82 
PETER BUCHANAN. 82. North Park, 

Emp 3 12-24, Died 3-1-82 
ROSARIO CAPPUZZELLO, 84, Const. & Maint., 

Emp. 8-1 28, Died 3-27-82 
LYLE CARLSON, 65, Limits, 

Emp 11-10-58, Died 3-27-82 
HORACE DECKER, 77. Stores, 

Emp 8-1-41, Died 3-3-82 
BERNARD FAY, 60, District D, 

Emp. 9-30-57, Died 3-23-82 
WILLIAM GROVES, 95, West Section. 

Emp. 8-5-43. Died 2-24-82 
ANTHONY GUSICH, 73, Plant Maint,, 

Emp. 5-9-30, Died 3-27-82 
ARTHUR HANSEN, 89, West Section, 

Emp 10-22-17, Died 3-19-82 



14 



DONALD HEANEY. Operator. 

North Park, Emp, 10-10-51 
CARL HICKMAN, Instructor, 

Training Center, Emp. 3-6-51 
McKINLEY JACKSON, Carpenter, 

West Shops, Emp. 2-13-51 
OSCAR JOHNSON, Seru. Trk Chauff . 

West Shops, Emp. 4-29-52 
ALVIN KISZKA, Operator, 

North Avenue. Emp. 9-23-47 
JOHN McCREA, Instructor, 

Archer, Emp. 2-4-46 
ANTHONY MUSTACCHIO, Serv. Trk. Chauff., 

West Shops, Emp. 3-19-47 
ROBERT NEALY, Conductor, 

61st Street, Emp. 11-18-41 
WILLIAM OCIEPKA, Bus Servicer. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 2-3-71 
JOHN O'SHEA, Lineman. 

West Shops. Emp. 7-25-50 
WILLIAM PLATT Sr.. Director. 

Job Classification. Emp. 8-25-39 
DANIEL PROFFITT. Prncpl. Appl. Analyst. 

Datacenter. Emp. 10-27-47 
THOMAS REILLY. Repairman. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 9-8-47 
SHELDON RITA. Terminal Foreman. 

Kimball. Emp. 5-27-46 
DELSO SMITH. Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 12-27-51 
JOHN THEIS. Carpenter. 

South Shops, Emp. 4-29-46 
JOSEPH WASHINGTON, Carpenter Frmn., 

West Shops. Emp. 10-9-51 
ANNE ZAHUMENSKY. Supervisor. 

Personnel Records. Emp, 5-1-43 



DISABILITY RETIREMENT 

JOSEPH IRWIN. Carpenter, 
South Shops, Emp. 8-10-49 



Service anniversaries in May 



35 years 



William Joyce, 77th Street 
Joseph Lacy, Track 
Raymond Leonhart, North Park 
William Liddell, Forest Glen 
Allan Pfeiffer, Special Group Sales 
Peter Szafranski Jr., Archer 
Theodore Szymanski, Skokie Shop 
William Webb. South Shops 
Isadore Wilkins, South Shops 



25 years 



Gregory Anthony, North Park 

Leo Armstrong, Central District 

Patrick Collins, Stores 

James Cunningham, Maintenance 

Thomas Davis, Washington 

William Echols, 77th Street 

Charles Gaines, 77th Street 

Michael Gricki, Lawndale 

Cleo Griffin, Forest Park 

James Harris, Beverly 

Eugene Hill, Utility 

Willie Johnson, Lawndale 

Frederick King Jr., Human Resources 

Nathan Lanier, North Avenue 



30 years 



Samuel Charles, Ashland/95th 
Wilbert Dalton, Beverly 
Edward Freeman, Maintenance 
Salvatore Braziano, North Avenue 
Gerald Jacob, North Park 
Nelson Swopes, North Avenue 



Ralph Lindquist, Archer 
Ralph MacDonald, Maintenance 
Theodore Mack, Instruction 
Clifford Miller, District A 
James Moore, Lawndale 
Albert Murdock. Track 
James Pruett Jr., 77th Street 
Lindsey Robinson, 77th Street 
Hercules Smith, Archer 
Leon Thomas, North Avenue 
Leon Washington, 77th Street 
Robert Watkins, 77th Street 
Raymond Wiley, 77th Street 
Shirley Willis Jr., 77th Street 



FRANK HELM, 78, Kedzie, 

Emp 9-20-29, Died 12-10-81 
LAWRENCE HOFFMAN. 66. Limits. 

Emp 1-21-46. Died 3-8-82 
AUGUST JOHNSON. 77. Transportation, 

Emp. 4-7-26. Died 3-6-82 
JOHN KARTALIS. 88. South Shops. 

Emp. 7-9-45. Died 4-28-81 
BERNARD KEIFER. 78, North Avenue. 

Emp. 7-22-27. Died 3-21-82 
CARL KLOESS, 64. Skokie Shop. 

Emp. 4-6-71. Died 4-15-82 
HENRY KRUEGER. 78. Forest Glen. 

Emp. 3-3-43. Died 3-21-82 
WILLIAM MacFARLANE. 76. Maint.. 

Emp. 10-16-24. Died 3-30-82 
HENRY MEYER. 79, North Section, 

Emp 12-10-24, Died 3-14-82 
CARL MIDLAND, 71, Claim, 

Emp 3-6-29, Died 3-20-82 
WILLIAM MOLLENKAMP, 66, Veh. Mtce., 

Emp. 5-13-41. Died 3-5-82 
NICHOLAS NORTHOFF. 85, Cottage Grove, 

Emp. 7-8-29, Died 3-1-82 
PATRICK O'MALLEY.' 74, North Park, 

Emp. 5-25-37. Died 2-25-82 



NICK POLICH. 88, Laborer. 

Emp 12-16-25, Died 3-4-82 
EARL READY. 85. Central District. 

Emp 6-20-14. Died 3-3-82 
FRANK RIO. 67, Kimball, 

Emp. 10-19-48. Died 3-2-82 
LAWRENCE SETTER. 97. Lawndale. 

Emp. 6-2-26. Died 3-5-82 
ELIJAH SMITH. 70. South Section. 

Emp. 4-13-50. Died 3-12-82 
ANTHONY SOKOL. 70. Shops. 

Emp. 11-4-30. Died 3-5-82 
ROGER STEELE. 64, North Avenue, 

Emp. 6-12-46, Died 3-31-82 
FRANK URBAN. 92. Cottage Grove. 

Emp. 9-26-12. Died 3-23-82 
PRUDENT VAN BOVEN. 85. Limits. 

Emp. 12-31-20. Died 2-25-82 
HERMAN VOGEL. 82. Howard. 

Emp 7-20-48. Died 3-1-82 
RAYMOND WORKMAN, 69, Plant Maint. 

Emp. 6-29-43. Died 3-29-82 
ROBERT WRIGHT. 58. Linden. 

Emp. 7-14-70. Died 3-15-82 
JOHN ZAHUMENSKY. 88. West Shops. 

Emp. 3-18-30. Died 3-10-82 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Volume 35 



Numbers 



Published tor employees and retirees of ttie CTA by 
ttie External Affairs Division, f^lctiael N. Horowitz, 
Manager. 

Editorial and grapfilcs by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Sen/Ices Department. 
Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555. Chicago. Il- 
linois 60654. 



MAY, 1982 



Important Notice to all Pensioners 



As many of you have noticed, starting with the March, 1982 
issue of Transit News, we have included a "SUBSCRIBER 
CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE. " This change of ad 
dress notice is intended for use ONLY BY 
SUBSCRIBERS to Transit News. NOT Pensioners. All 
Pensioners must continue to use the Pensioner's Change 
of Address form, available through the CTA Pension 
Department. Transit News is forwarded a copy of the Pen- 
sioner's Change of Address form, and enters the change of 



address in its files accordingly. Your cooperation in using 
the proper form (Pensioner's Change of Address) will be 
greatly appreciated, as Transit News has received several 
pensioners' change of address on the Subscriber Change 
of Address Notice. The Subscriber's Notice is NOT forward- 
ed to the Pension Department by Transit News, and 
therefore the address change cannot be entered in your 
Retirement File. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



DOCUMENTS LIBnARIAII • ." TN 

Govt. Publications Department 
Horthwefjtorii University Library 
iivanston, 11. 60201 



t Pubi. 



^CJaU^..^^ n^--- f f 




Bernard J. Ford 
appointed 
&tecutive Director 

Bernard J. Ford, General Manager of the Regional 
Transportation Authority (RTA), was appointed Executive 
Director of the Chicago Transit Authority by the Chicago 
Transit Board on June 2. 

"I am pleased my fellow board members joined me in 
voting to have Bernie Ford become Executive Director of 
the CTA. His strong administrative transit background will 
be an asset to the Authority." said CTA Chairman Michael 
A. Cardilli. 

Ford returns to CTA where he had worked from 1956 to 
1975. While at CTA. Ford served as the Chief Ad- 
ministrative Officer, Special Assistant to the Chairman. 
Director of Personnel Administration, and had held posi- 
tions in research and personnel training 

At the RTA, Ford also held the positions of Special Assist- 
ant to the Chairman and Director of Transportation 

Ford is a member of the Technical Advisory Committee of 
the Illinois Transportation Study Commission, a member of 
the board of directors of the American Public Transit 
Association (APTA). and a member of the Membership 
Committee of APTA. 

Ford. 45. was born in Chicago and was graduated from 
St. Benedict High School. He studied at Loyola and 
Northwestern Universities and the University of Notre Dame 
where he majored in industrial psychology 

He and his wife. Edna, have four children and reside on 
the northwest side of Chicago. 



Everyone's invited! 

2nd Annual 




&SSO 

Final Competition 

Sunday, July 25, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Soldier Field South Parking Lot 




*CTA's top 20 bus operators will compete on a demanding 

driving course. 
*Winner will represent CTA in the APTA International Bus 

Roadeo in Boston in October 
*CTA's Historical Bus Collection will be on display. 
*Mini-bus tram will give free rides to children 
♦ Spectator seating will be provided, and refreshments will 

be available 




Last year's CTA Bus Roadeo winner, Martin Troglia (Limits 
garage), recently enjoyed a vacation In Toronto as part of his first 
prize award. He also visited tfie Toronto Transit Commission, 
where Keith Pryce, Assistant Divisional Superintendent, 
Transportation Department. TTC, demonstrated a new bus radio 
system Installed on buses in Toronto. 




Enm^MO^Mizs 



FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

JUNE, 1982 



From the Chairman 

Looking ahead, 
safety and 
summer events 



On behalf of all CTA employees. I 
welcome aboard our new Executive 
Director, Bernard J, Ford. Mr. Ford's 
strong administrative background and 
diversified transit experience will cer- 
tainly be great assets to the Authority 
as we fine-tune our budgetary ad- 
justments and organizational 
realignments to enable CTA to 
operate efficiently and economically. 

Once again, I stress that we can only 
achieve these goals with the coopera- 
tion of each and every one of you. We 
expect and demand dedicated job per- 
formance from all employees and 
responsible supervision from those of 
you in management positions. 
Through our efforts, CTA will become 
a greater source of pride for all 
Chicagoans, and an example for other 
transit systems throughout the coun- 
try. 

One example of outstanding job 
performance is the improved safety 
record attained by the operating and 
non-operating locations recently 
honored by the Greater Chicago Safe- 
ty Council (page 15). Safety is one of 
our primary concerns because 
operating safety increases public con- 
fidence in our service and industrial 
safety benefits employees and reduces 
unnecessary expenses. 

We can also take pride in two of our 
special summertime programs. 
Memorial Day was opening day for 
our CTA Culture Buses. Revised 
routes with additional attractions have 
further improved this informative, 
educational, and entertaining service, 
which enables Chicagoans and visitors 
to gain a greater appreciation of our ci- 
ty's cultural attractions through our 
transit system. 

On July 25 at the Soldier Field 
South Parking Lot, our top 20 qualify- 
ing bus operators from garage-level 
competition will compete in the 1982 
CTA Bus Roadeo finals, and the win- 
ner will represent CTA at the APTA 
International Bus Roadeo in Boston in 
October. 1 invite all of you to attend 
the finals, support the contestants dur- 
ing this demanding drivmg competi- 
tion, and show your appreciation for 
our "front line" operating employees 
who work hard every day serving the 
public. 




Superior Public Service Awards 

CTA recipients of the 1982 Superior Public Service Awards were lionored at the annual 
Awards Luncheon held May 13 at the Bismark Hotel. Displaying their certificates are (from 
left) Harold Hirsch, Manager, Operations Planning; Richard Andrzejewski, Special Assistant 
to the Chief Administrative Officer; CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli, on hand to express ap- 
preciation to recipients for an outstanding job; Edward Henry, Supervisor, Safety Performance 
Analysis, and Jeffery Sapinsky, Safety Specialist, Facilities Engineering and Maintenance. 
The awards are presented annually to outstanding employees in Chicago municipal agencies. 





UMTA Administrator 
visits Chicago 

Arthur E. Teele Jr., Administrator, Urban 
Mass Transportation Administration, 
recently visited Chicago, met with city of- 
ficials, inspected the Loop 'L' structure, 
and rode CTA's newest 2600-series rapid 
transit cars and an articulated bus. Shown 
on the Loop 'L' platform are (left to right): 
CTA General Operations Manager Harold 
H. Geissenheimer; Joseph McGinn, 
Manager, Sales, Railway Division, The 
Budd Company; CTA Chairman Michael 
Cardilli; Teele; Ira Bach, Director of 
Development, City of Chicago; and 
Jerome Butler, Commissioner, Depart- 
ment of Public Works, City of Chicago. 
The articulated bus was driven by William 
Spencer, Archer garage, who was a 
member of the "Winning Circle 20" In last 
year's CTA Bus Roadeo. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Culture Bus season opens 

with revised routes and more attractions 

The CTA Culture Bus season opened on Memorial Day, 
May 31, featuring revisions to all three routes and 14 new 
stops and attractions. These are sure to attract increased 
ridership when the Culture Bus operates on Sundays and 
holidays this summer and fall. 

The South Route has been revised to provide faster ser- 
vice with new stops at McCormick Place and Buckingham 
Fountain. 

The new North Route features more direct routing to 
Water Tower Place and the Lincoln Park area, with new 
stops at the Rush Street and Old Town entertainment areas, 
Fullerton Beach, and the Petrillo Music Shell. 

An extensive revision of the West Route has doubled the 
number of attractions. Chinatown and the Ling Long 
Chinese Museum, the Maxwell Street Market area, the 
Printers Row Printing Museum, and the ArchiCenter have 
been added. This route also provides convenient service to 
the Union and North Western commuter stations. 

Once again, the Culture Bus features on-board commen- 
tators who inform riders of the attractions and points of 
cultural and historic interest along the routes. 

The service has been publicized through news releases 
and promotional flyers which have been distributed to more 
than 40 hotels, information booths in public buildings, and 
museums along the Culture Bus routes. 

Each rider also receives a souvenir Culture Bus Guide 
featuring photos and descriptions of major attractions along 
the three routes. 

Ridership during the first three weeks has been very en- 
couraging. As the public became aware of the revised routes 
and new attractions, ridership increased more than 60 per 
cent from the first to the third week. Commentators report 
that riders have shown great enthusiasm for the revised 
routes and new attractions, and a record Culture Bus year is 
expected. 

If you would like more information, or if you would like a 
Culture Bus Flyer sent to your work location, contact Jeff 
Stern at 664-7200, Ext. 3315, or Ron Weslow on Ext. 
3013. 




The Old Town area along North Wells Street, featuring 
restaurants, museums, night spots, and specialty shops, is a new 
attraction on the North Route. 




At the Printers Row Printing Museum, riders on the West Route 
may learn about the historical and technological development of 
the printing industry, and they may order custom printing pro- 
duced on the museum's 19th Century hand-operated presses that 
once formed the backbone of the printing Industry. 









Man of 












■^, 


the Year 






'" ^ ^ 


CTA Board Member 






Nick Ruggiero was 






SI 


chosen "Man of the 






Year" by the 






J 


Evergreeti Park 






^"^^ 


Chapter of the Order 








of the Sons of Italy in 




^ 


America. Mr. Rug- 
giero was honored at 






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a dinner held in the 






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Martinique Restaurant 






1 / 'i 


in Evergreen Park on 






the evening of June 5. 











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On the South Culture Bus Route, the Henry B. Clarke House, 
Chicago's oldest existing private residence, is a new feature of 
the Prairie Avenue Historic District stop. This is the house that 
was moved over the L' tracks at 44th Street and Calumet during 
the early morning hours of December 4, 1977 (see Transit News. 
December 1977). 



JUNE, 1982 



Rosie Jones (North Avenue 
garage) was appreciated by 
Carlos Perkins of North 
Sacramento Boulevard, a 
rider on her #20 Madison bus. 
"I was having a little difficul- 
ty handling my two suitcases, 
as I was just recently re- 
leased from the hospital. See- 
ing my plight, this lady 
operator asked a younger 
passenger if he would help 
me with my luggage. She 
then asked another pas- 
senger if I might have the 
front seat in which he was sit- 
ting, since I was handi- 
capped. She announced each 
stop distinctly and appeared 
friendly toward each 
passenger. When I reached 
my stop, she again asked 
another passenger to help me 
off with my luggage. If all 
operators were as courteous 
as this lady, I would gladly 
pay higher fares." 




Jesse Marshall, Jr. (North 
Park garage) was called "an 
excellent, very careful 
driver," by Winifred Good, of 
North Lake Shore Drive, lor 
the way he drove a #151 
Sheridan bus. "He was ob- 
viously concerned about the 
safety of his passengers, and 
although he didn't waste 
time, he waited at every stop 
until the last rider getting off 
was safe before he pulled 
away. He was courteous and 
cheerful, and everyone 
seemed to get a lift just from 
being on his bus. Because of 
the driver's concern and cor- 
diality, there was a general 
atmosphere of joviality and 
friendliness." 



commendation corner 



Patrick Corcione (Forest Glen garage) was praised for his 
"exemplary performance and professional attitude." by 
Mary Scheller, of Summerdalc Avenue, a regular rider of 
his #69 Cumberland Express bus. "He continually im- 
pressed me with his sincere respect and concern for his 
passengers. He displays those courtesies that make riding 
the CTA enjoyable. He is always prompt, safe in driving, 
and is responsive to the various needs of passengers. He 
pauses to wait for hurrying last-minute passengers to board, 
and pulls up immediately at the terminal to let passengers on 
so we don't have to wait outside. It is truly a pleasure to 
have him in the driver's seat." 

Stanley Stevenson (North Park garage) was the operator 
of a #96 Lunt bus ridden by Laura DiBiase, of Coyle 
Avenue. "It is a pleasure to be a passenger on his bus 
because he is very polite and courteous to the people. He 
stops at every bus stop, thus giving a person a decent 
chance to make the bus. He stops directly in front of the 
waiting passengers so that people do not have to trample 
each other to catch up with it. He waits for those who are 
running for it. no matter how far away they may be. He is 
doing a fine job" 

Electra DeAlba (North Avenue garage) was admired by 
Elaine Kaleta of Wolfram Street for her handling of "a tough 
situation" on a #54 Cicero bus. "She had her wits about her 
and insisted upon having all rules and regulations followed 
in a polite way as she dealt with a bus load of ill-mannered. 
loud and vulgar teenagers At Belmont throngs of high 
school students tried boarding the bus. many at the rear 
door This young lady handled this horrible situation in a 
most professional way. I'm sure she has to put up with 
similar conditions several times a day. My hat goes off to 
her." 



Charles Young (West Section) was complimented by Mrs. 
G. F. Manquen of North Riverside, for his performance as 
conductor of a Douglas-Milwaukee train. "He called stations 
in a clear, pleasant, well-modulated voice. He called sta- 
tions, clearly stating what trains one could transfer to. He 
also stated what civic or other buildings could be reached 
from a station. As passengers prepared to leave the train he 
cautioned them to be sure to pick up all their belongings, 
and wished them a good day. The car 1 was in was crowded 
with people standing, but this man put a smile and a relaxed 
look on the faces of the passengers," 

Tyrone Laury (South Section), a conductor on the North- 
South Main Line, and Isaac Pollinetz, a rail janitor, were 
praised by Mary Gray of West Washington Street, for pursu- 
ing a thief who had snatched her purse on a Howard train. 
"I was robbed by a young man at Wilson. He took my purse 
and jumped off the train, I tried to hold on to it. but he was 
strong and yanked it away. But thanks to an alert conductor 
who realized something was wrong as I left the train calling 
out for help. The conductor helped catch the theif on the 
platform, with assistance from a man from the cleanup 
crew, 1 am deeply grateful to both men I got my purse back 
and the crook was arrested," 

Wallacene Good (Forest Glen garage) was commended 
by Howard Meyer, of North Long Avenue, for her opera- 
tion of a #56 Milwaukee Avenue bus, "She was one of the 
most efficient drivers I have ever ridden with She was very 
polite and courteous, called all her stops, said hello and 
good-bye to riders, and really knew how to handle people 
and also the bus She deserves all the praise in the world. If 
most of the drivers were like her. this would certainly be a 
nice world I hope I ride with her again, it was such a 
pleasure" 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees honored with *A Day in CTA' 



Transportation Manager James 
Blaa presented certificates of special 
recognition to a bus operator and a 
motorman for acts of heroism by them 
on their respective service routes. 

Honored on "A Day in CTA" were 
Operator James Washington of 77th 
Street garage, and Motorman Donnie 
Reeves of the 54th Street Terminal. 

Operator Washington received the 
special recognition for his response to 
an altercation between four youths, 
which occurred on his eastbound 87th 
Street bus on April 15. During the inci- 
dent (as reported in the May issue of 
Transit News). Washington disarmed 
one youth, who was carrying a hand- 
gun, and turned him over to police 
custody. 

Another quick response by Motor- 
man Donnie Reeves, to a medically- 
disabled passenger on March 11, may 
have also saved a life, according to 
Assistant Superintendent Jerry L. 
Johnson, 54th Street Terminal. 

Reeves was a passenger aboard a 
northbound West-Northwest train 
when another male passenger became 
ill. Reeves went to assist the train's 




Transportation Manager James Blaa (right) presents certificates of special recognition 
for outstanding performance to "A Day in CTA" honorees. The recipients are (left) Bus 
Operator James Washington and l\1otorman Donnie Reeves. 



crew and found that the passenger 
was turning blue from lack of oxygen. 
Applying first aid skills which he had 
acquired while serving in the military, 
Reeves cleared the man's air passages 
and made it possible for him to 
breathe. He assisted the man until 
paramedics arrived to take him to a 



hospital. 

In addition to the certificates of 
special recognition, the honorees were 
treated to a day of visiting with CTA 
Transportation management, which 
included a tour of the Control Center, 
the Travel Information Center, and 
other facilities. 



Thanks — for a job well done 



Pedro Alicea, Howard/Kimball 
Genuel Aimodovar, North Park 
Rowland Arnette, Lawndale 

William Banks, North Avenue 
Jonas Barnett, Washington 
J. Battles, North Avenue 
Arnold Beler, North Park 
Susan Brasewicz, Archer 



Clyde Hall, 77th Street 
Eldred Hall. North Park 
George Hardin, 77th Street 
Miguel Hernandez, North Park 
Cloray Hilliard, 77th Street 
Otto Houston, North Park 
Margaret Hunt, Forest Glen 

Robert Jones, North Park 



Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listinq 

President Puckett, Lawndale 
Harry Purnell. 69th Street 

Samuel Ramos, Forest Glen 
Thomas Rhone, 77th Street 

Pablo Silva, Limits 

Terry Smoczynski, Forest Glen 

Robert Spann, North Park 



Jean Cage, North Park 
Fred Caldwell, Lawndale 
Angel Carreras, Forest Glen 
Hubbard Coleman, Ashland 
Israel Cruz, North Avenue 

Elizabeth Duren, North Avenue 

James Edwards, North Avenue 
Madison Edwards, 77th Street 

Henry Fields, North Avenue 

Edward Gonzalez, Archer 
Roldan Gonzalez, North Section 
Semoria Green, 77th Street 



Lacy Kennedy, 69th Street 
Charles Kinnard, 77th Street 
Thomas Kissel, North Park 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Phillip Larry, Limits 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Tulio Lopez, North Park 

William McDonald Jr., Limits 
Mario Merendon, Forest Glen 
Howard Monroe, North Park 
Humberto Monroy, North Park 
Rick Moorhe, Rail District South 
Faye Murry. Limits 



Robert Taylor, 77th Street 
Maureen Thivel, North Section 
William Thomas, 

Douglas/Congress 

Gerardo Vargas, North Park 

Elizabeth Washington, 77th Street 
Fredrick White, North Park 
Patricia Williams. North Park 
Cedric Wright. North Park 

James Yancey. Limits 
Charles Young. Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman. North Park 



JUNE, 1982 



safety awards 



Public safety awards for the first 
quarter of 1982 went to Forest Glen 
garage and Douglas terminal. It was 
the 11th time Forest Glen received the 
award since 1961 when the safety pro- 
gram started. It was also the eighth 
time Douglas earned the award. 

Forest Glen last won the award for 
the third quarter, 1980. Douglas last 
won the award for the second quarter, 
1977. 

The north side garage won with a 



traffic rate of 4.92 (100,000 miles) ac- 
cidents during the quarter, a 24 per 
cent better rate than the entire' bus 
system rate of 6.45. 

In the first quarter of this year. 
Forest Glen experienced a passenger 
rate of 0.74. In other words, for every 
400,000 miles of operation, the 
garage was involved in three ac- 
cidents. The rate was 35 per cent bet- 
ter than the bus system rate of 1.14 
(100,000 miles). 

During this year's first quarter, 
Douglas was involved in only one acci- 
dent. This tied the all-time low record 
for number of quarterly accidents 



which was established in the first 
quarter, 1979, by Forest Park ter- 
minal. 

Douglas won the award with a com- 
bined traffic and passenger rate of 
0.123 accidents for every 100,000 car 
miles operated. 

This rate was 67 per cent lower than 
the entire rail system rate of 0.373. In 
other words, Douglas experienced 1.2 
accidents for every million miles of 
operation and experienced 89 
accident-free days during the- first 
quarter of 1982. 




Tom Boyle (left), Manager, Safety Department, presents Public 
Safety Award for first quarter, 1982, to Michael J. Veltrl, 
Superintendent, Douglas/Congress rail terminals. Douglas won 
the award. Veltri Is backed by Alex Wilson (at his right) and Elliott 
Linne, Assistant Superintendents, Douglas/Congress terminals. 



Douglas terminal Motormen Eddie Wansley (left) and Joseph 
Cabrnock display special citations for excellent performance 
presented them by James R. Blaa, Manager, Transportation 
Department. Sam Smith (far right), Blaa's Special Assistant, joins 
the happy scene. 




Tom Boyle, Manager, Safety, presents Public Safety Award to 
Hugh Masterson, Superintendent, Forest Glen garage, for win- 
ning first quarter, 1982, safety competition among lOgarages. Bill 
Moser, Area Superintendent, Far North, beams his approval. 



Forest Glen Operators Michael Borchek (left) and Tommy Ross 
display special citations for excellence presented them by Harry 
Reddrick (center), Director, Personnel, Transportation Depart- 
ment. 



CJA TRANSIT NEWS 



Advocacy program, Chicago Police survey, 
presented at 77th Street 



Volunteer advocates in CTA's 
Assault and Rape Victim Advocacy 
Program and representatives from the 
Chicago Police Department held a 
special garage-level presentation at 
77th Street garage on June 3. The 
presentation was designed to make 
employees more aware of the Ad- 
vocacy service, to sensitize them to 
cautionary measures against the 
possibility of assault, and to obtain par- 
ticipation from operating employees in 
a Police Department survey. 

The survey, designed to collect data 
on various problems encountered by 
CTA employees and their riders and 
the areas in which the problems occur, 
was distributed to bus operators by the 
Police Department. The forms will be 
collected by the station clerk and 
turned over to the Police Department. 
The data gathered from the survey will 
help the police to more effectively plan 
crime prevention activities in the areas 
served by the garage. 

Rosemary Barnett, Transportation 
Programs Analyst, Transportation 
Department, explained the Advocacy 
Program. Garage personnel were 
assured by members of the Chicago 
Police Department as well as CTA 
management, of support for the pro- 
gram, and of the stepped up efforts by 
the Police Department to control 
criminal activity against CTA riders 
and employees. Bus pool Supervisor 
Jenipher Finger is the 77th Street 
garage Advocate Coordinator. 

Officer Taya Sun of the Police 
Department's Preventive Programs 
Bureau of Community Service gave 
77th Street personnel a talk on tech- 
niques for avoiding assault and rape. 
Her talk was followed by a film on the 
subject. 

Mary Beth Cobleigh, Advocacy 
Program Coordinator, said that 
Transportation Manager James Blaa 
has planned similar presentations at 
other Transportation locations. 





Above: McClinton Porter, Superintendent, 
77th Street garage, welcomes CTA 
management team, Police Department of- 
ficials, volunteers, advocates, and 
operating personnel. 

Left, above: Officer Taya Sun, tfie Chicago 
Police Department's Preventive Programs 
Bureau representative, explains useful 
techniques for avoiding assault and rape 
to operators at 77th Street garage. 

Left: Chicago Police Sergeant Joe Petrich, 
Chicago Police Department, CTA Detail, 
lauds CTA for its Advocacy program and 
pledges continued support from the 
Police Department. 

Below: Lester Packer, Control Center Area 
Superintendent, passes out Chicago 
Police Department survey forms to 
operators. 




JUNE, 1982 



ZAP awards 



The employees of the 61st/Racine 
Rail Maintenance terminal did it again- 
-they won first place in the Zero Acci- 
dent Program competition for the first 
quarter of 1982--their fifth time in a 
row. 

Beverly and 69th Street garages 
shared first place honors in the ZAP 
award Bus Garage competition. 

Six areas in the Bus Shops worked 
without reported injuries in the first 
quarter of 1982. They are the sheet 
metal, upholstery, and print shops, 
and mechanical, inspection, and utility 
shops. 

Winners in the Rail Shop competi- 
tion in Skokie Shop are the paint 
shop, armature room, shop service, 
degrcasing, and sub-mechanical. 




Members of first quarter, '82 ZAP safety award first place team are (from left) Leon 
Pledger and Steve Butler, Car Repairers; Mel Mcintosh, Clerk; and Frank Lewis and Al 
Moore, Car Repairers, all of the 61st/Racine Rail Maintenance terminal. 




First quarter, 1982 ZAP Bus Shops winners include (from left) Terry Culkin, Bus & Truck 
Leader; Ray Klaub, Sheet Metal Shop Foreman; Frank Gray, Bus & Truck Mechanic; Rudy 
Goode, Degreasing & Teardown Shop Foreman; Ed Meskimen, Print Shop Foreman, and 
John Kurgan, Upholstery Shop Foreman. At Kurgan's right are Jim Dudley, Equipment 
Engineering/Maintenance Department Safety Supervisor; Terry McGuigan, Bus Shops 
Superintendent, and Bob Ready (far right), Safety Specialist. 




Rail Shop ZAP winners for first quarter, '82, are (from left) Marty 
Venticlnque, Degreasing Area Acting Foreman; Frank Porcaro, 
Sub-Mechanical Shop Foreman; George Wylie, Acting Unit Super- 
visor; Vito Pontrelli, Electrician, Armature Room; George 
Klaenisch, Rail Vehicle Shop Superintendent; Len Davenport, Unit 
Supervisor, and Jan Broda, Paint Shop Foreman. 



Among the winners of the first quarter, '82 ZAP awards in the Bus 
Shop competition in South Shops are (from left) Max Tepper, 
Sheet Metal Worker; Jeffery Mutnansky, Bus & Truck Mechanic; 
Toby Warmack, Bindery Worker; Joe Scott, Bus & Truck Helper; 
William Stallworth, Upholsterer; Aaron Morris and Gary 
Machonga, Bus & Truck Mechanics. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Saving money 
with your 
credit union 

More than 17,000 members of CTA's 
18 credit unions believe that belonging 
to one of these savings and loan associa- 
tions makes a lot of dollars and sense. 
Members include CTA employees, 
retirees, and their next of kin. 

Credit unions have a longer history in 
Chicago public transit than does CTA. 
They were started by members of Divi- 
sions 241 and 308, ATU, in various 
streetcar bams of the Chicago Surface 
Lines and at the Chicago Rapid Transit 
Company locations, both predecessor 
companies to CTA. on December 11, 
1937. CTA began operations nearly 10 
years later, in 1947. 

The purpose of credit unions is to 
provide low-cost loans to employees 
to combat exorbitant interest rates be- 
ing charged by commercial and non- 
commercial lending agencies. Cou- 
pled with loans, credit unions are also 
designed to provide a convenient sav- 
ings system for members. 

In the last year, credit unions ex- 
panded their savings programs to in- 
clude certificates of deposit (CD's), 
IRA accounts, and All Savers ac- 
counts. Each credit union account is 
insured up to $100,000 by the federal 
government's National Credit Union 
Administration. 

Another plus for membership is an ar- 
rangement which the 18 credit unions 
have with CTA. Through the use of a 
convenient payroll deduction plan, 
savers and borrowers may have 
designated amounts deducted from their 
paychecks and sent to their credit union. 

CTA's credit unions also offer many 
other valuable services which may in- 
clude group buying discounts, vaca- 
tion plans, and financial advice. These 
services vary with each credit union, 
so check with your nearest credit 
union to learn about additional ser- 
vices that may help you save money. 



CTA Credit Union 


Offices 








BUS GARAGE 


TREASURER 


PHONE 


HOURS 


MEMBERS 


Archer 


Austion Woolfolk 


927-0909 


Noon-3 p.m. Mon, Tues 
Thurs, Fri 


1,194 


Beverly 


Erving Weiier 


445-7343 


11 a.m. -3 p.m. Mon, 
Thurs, Fri 


600 


Forest Glen 


John Kurinec 


774-2713 


9 a.m. -12:30 p.m. 
Mon, Tues, Wed; 
1-4 p.m. Thurs, Fri 


1,450 


Kedzie 


Ted Heffernan 


722-2525 


11 a.m. -4:30 p.m. Mon. 
Tues, Thurs, Fri 


1,000 


Limits 


Dennis Kippes 


525-5665 


1-5 p.m. Mon, Wed, Fri; 
11:30 a.m.-l p.m. Sat 


•637 


North Avenue 


Aaron Pruitt 


252-5421 


10 a.m. -3 p.m. 
Mon, Thurs. Fri 


1,100 


North Park 


Gerald Budisz 


478-0574 


10 a.m. -3 p.m. 
Mon, Thurs, Fri 


1,238 


52nd Street 


Tyler Philpott 


324-5919 


10:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m. 
Mon, Thurs, Fri 


315 


69th Street 


Thomas Cook 


476-4822 


11 a.m. -3 p.m. 
Mon, Tues, Thurs 


885 


77th Street 


Redo Hall 


846-7137 


9 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Mon, Thurs. Fri 


1,700 


RAPID TRANSIT 










Lake Street 


John H. McCarty 


971-3774 


8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
Mon thru Fri 


1,175 


Metropolitan 


John Caroian 


386-9272 


9 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Mon thru Fri 


820 


North Side 


Hal Statts 


561-9876 


9 a.m. -2:30 p.m. 
Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri 


1.196 


South Side 


Robert Stewart 


737-3646 


Noon-4 p.m. Mon, 
Tues, Thurs, Fri 


371 


SHOPS 










Construction & 
Maintenance 


Joseph Christoi 


826-9222 


7 a.m. -Noon 
Mon thru Fri 


590 


South Side 


John Jankus 


874-7100, 
Ext. 341 


7:30 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Mon thru Fri 


670 


MERCHANDISE MART 








General Office 


Herb Schomer 


664-7200, 
Ext. 4605 


8 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
Mon thru Fri 


2,100 


Department of 
Action & 
Investigation 


Dan Perk 


664-7200, 
Ext. 4693 


8 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
Mon thru Fri 


269 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mail to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merchandise Man, Chicago, IL 60654. 



JUNE, 1982 



HERB L. ADKINS 


ELIZABETH BAXA 


GINA BENUZZI 


JERRY BENUZZI 


MARK BLACK 


SUE BOYLE 


DeLaSalle 


Immaculate Heart of Mary 


Foreman H.S. 


Northeastern College 


South Shore H.S. 


Marillac H.S 


Ruth Adktns 


C, W, Baxa 


William Benuzzi 


William Benuzzi 


Robert Black 


T.D. Boyle 


Archer 


Public Affairs 


Lawndale 


Lawndale 


North District 


Safety 




Gallery of June 

Graduates 
In CTA Families 

Here are the proudest pictures 
of the year identified by name, 
school, parent and parent's 
CTA work location. 



\mi 



|P> ^ 



wiMimi 




LATANYA BROWN 

Academy of Our Lady 
Arthur Brown 
69th Street 



LORNA D. BUTLER 

St Willibrod H.S, 
Gordon A. Butler 
South Section 



JEFFERY S. CASILLAS 


RYDELL CEPHAS 


Bremen H S 


Leo H S 


John Casillas 


James Cephas 


South Shops 


69th Street 




SALANA J. CHEARS 


CINDY CHUNOWITZ 


WILLIAM K. CLAIBORNE 


VONDA KAY COLLINS 


BRENDA M. DAVIS 


TONI TALISE 


Julian H.S 


Niles North H.S. 


Julian H.S, 


Hyde Park Academy 


Aquinas H.S. 


DERANSBURG 


Bernard Chears 


Jack Chunowitz 


William B. Claiborne 


Victor E. Collins 


Jessie F. Davis 


Julian H.S. 


Howard 


Claim 


Training Center 


77th Street 


Forest Glen 


Lyie A Deransburg 
Randolph & Wells 




MARIA TERESA DEXTER 


TRACIE MARIE DOWNES 


PFC PETER A. DREY 


KIMBERLY 0. DuCREE 


CECILIA LYNN ELAM 


SONJA R. GARDNER 


Alvernia H S 


St Scholastica H.S. 


Ft Leonard Wood 


Our Lady of Hungary 


Hillcrest H S 


Willibrod H.S. 


Jerome Dexter 


Jim Downes 


George E. Drey 


Kenneth 0. DuCree 


Ellie M. Elam 


Melvin Gardner 


South Shops 


Skokie Shop 


South Shops 


691h Street 


69th Street 


Beverly 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





^^ 



CHARLES 0. 


PHYLLIS A. GASPARAITIS 


VERONICA GECAN 


GWENDOLYN GIBSON 


JOANNE GINGRAS 


DOUGLAS M. GOARD Jr. 


GASIOROWSKI 


Schaumburg H S- 


St, Zachary 


Corliss H S 


Queen of Peace H S 


Julian H S 


Johnsburg H.S. 


Vincent A. Gasparaitis 


T S Gecan 


Maurice Gibson 


Joe Gingras 


Erma J Goard 


Joseph T. Gasiorowski 


West Shops 


South Shops 


North Avenue 


Datacenter 


Safety 


Kimball Shop 














DEANNA GOLDEN 


YVONNE GRIFFIN 


NICOLAS R. GRISETO 


PAMELA D. GROSS 


DONNA A. HAWKINS 


LINDA HAWORTH 


Resurrection H.S. 


Corliss H.S. 


Beavis H S 


DePaul University 


DePaul University 


Mother McAuley 


James Golden 


Walter Griffin Jr. 


Richard N. Griseto 


Oscar Gross 


Donald Hawkins 


William T- Hav»orth 


Signal 


West Shops 


West Shops 


South Shops 


West Shops 


South Shops 




SANDY HAWORTH 


DAVID HAYMON 


SHAUN YVETTE HEAD 


YOLANDA HILL 


ROBERT L. HUNT 


TYRONE IVORY 


U of 1, Champ./Urb. 


Rich South H.S. 


Elizabeth Seton H.S. 


Chicago Vocational H.S. 


Hillcrest H.S. 


Quigley South 


William T. Haworth 


Peggy Haymon 


Edward A. Head Jr. 


Dewey Hill 


Marianne Hunt 


Hubert Ivory Sr. 


South Shops 


Agent Supv. Dist. Office 


77th Street 


61st Street 


Madison & Wabash 


Central District 



. BP^ 



JODI LEE JACOBI 

Sawyer Business Colle 
Fred R. Jacobi 
South Shops 



'.%* 



ti ^^m 



LORRAINE JAMISON 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 

Joseph E. Jamison 

South Shops 




CHRISTINE JEDYNAK 

Loyola University 

Edward Jedynak 

Wilson Shop 



TIMOTHY L. JONES 

DeLaSalle 

Bettye Jones 

Limits 



YOLANDA 0. JONES 

Jones Commercial H.S. 

Norman & Minnie Jones 

77th Street 



BEVERLEY M. KLEICH 

Triton College 

Kenneth W. Klelch 

West Shops 



JUNE, 1982 



TIMOTHY J. KLEICH 

Maine West H.S. 

Kenneth W- Kleich 

West Shops 



CHARLENE J. LEE 

Gulfport H.S. 
Charles H. Lee 
Central District 



LAMETHA LEWIS 

Dunbar Vocational H.S, 

Betty Stephenson 
Agent Supv. Dist. Office 



STEVEN L. LEWIS 

Luther South H.S. 

Winmon Lewis Jr. 

South Shops 



MARCI L. LIGHTER 

Niles West H.S. 

Allen R. Lichter 

District D 



KIUBERLY LONEY 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 

Walter Caston 

District A 




SHAN LONG 

DePaul University 

Richard Long Jr. 

District C 



MICHAEL M. LUPETINI 

Glenbrook North H.S. 
Lino Lupetini 
Skokie Shop 



WANDA L. MASSEY 

Notre Dame 

James Massey 

69th Street 



CHRYSANTHE MATTISON 

Central YMCA H.S. 

Grady O. Mattison 

South Shops 



TAL McGREGORY 

Crete-Monee H.S. 

Elaine McGregory 

Claim 



MARK MICETICH 

Bogan H.S. 

Francis Micetich 

Retired 




ANTHONY MOORE 

rshall Fundamental H.S. 
Sylvester Moore 
69th Street 



JACQUELYN MOORE 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 
Joe W Moore 
West Shops 



JOHN D. MOORE 

St Peter & Paul H.S 

William E. Moore 

Near South 



BENJAMIN C. MORRIS 

Brother Rice 

B.C. Morris 

Control Center 



KERRY M. MURPHY 

Mother McAuiey 
Bill Murphy 
Datacenter 



ROBERT J. NELSON 

Grant Community H.S. 

Richard Nelson Sr. 

West Shops 




LISA 0. NEWMAN 

Hillcrest H S 

Robed Newman 

District A 



NEDA A. NORMAN 

Dunbar Vocational H.S. 

John C. Norman 

South Shops 



MARGARET O'CONNOR 

Mother Guerin H.S. 
Robert O'Connor 
Labor Relations 



EUGENE H. OFFETT Jr. 

Dunbar Vocational H.S. 
Celestine Offett 
Secretary's Office 



JEANNINE D. OGLETREE 

Jones Commercial H S. 

Claudette Ogletree 

North Avenue 



MARCIA L. OLIVER 

Tinley Park H.S. 
Joe E. Oliver 
77th Street 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




CHARLES E. PARKER II 

DeLaSalle 

Charles E, Parker I 

Archer 



JOHN PERKINS III 

Taft H.S 

John Perkins II 

Washington Garage 



THERESA PETERS 

Thornwood H.S. 

Theodore Peters 

District A 



FRED PETRINO 

Holy Cross H.S. 

Fred A. Petrino 

Plant Maint. 



ELLA JANE POE 

Hyde Park Academj 
Leon Poe Sr. 
South Shops 



LEON POE Jr. 

Kentucky State U 
Leon Poe Sr. 
South Shops 




LUCILLE POPEK 

Proviso East H.S. 

Thomas Popek 

Safety 



ADRIAN L. PORTER Jr. 

Thornridge H.S 

Lillie Mae Watkins 

Lawndale 



DAYNA V. POWELL 

Hyde Park Academy 

Donald F. Powell 

South Shops 



DONNA MARIE PURNELL 

Hyde Park Academy 

Clenter Purnell 
Travel Information 



CAPRI REEVES 

Corliss H.S. 
Barbara Reeves 
Training Center 



GEORGE L. RICHMOND III 

Morgan Park H.S. 

George Richmond 

61st Street 




TAMARA RODGERS 

Loyola University 
Thelma Rodgers 
Adm. Services 



MICHELLE ROHLICEK 

Mother Guerin H S 

Patrick Rohlicek 

District D 



MARIA V. ROSADO 

Rosary College 

Alejandro Reyes 

Retired 



SHERI D. RUDOLPH 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 
West Rudolph Jr. 
Central Assignment 



STEVE RYAN 

Wheaton/Warrenville 

Bob Ryan 

Public Affairs 



CATHERINE A. SALERNO 

Morton East H.S. 

Salvatore A. Salerno 

North Avenue 




LORNA R. SANDERS 

Aquinas H.S 

Charles B. Morris 

District C 



ROBERTINE SANDERS 

Thornwood H S 

Robert J. Sanders 

Howard 



MARTHA BEATRIZ 
SANTANA 

Streamwood H.S. 

Ramon Santana 

Skokie Shop 



JOHNNY B. SHERROD Jr. 

St Ignatius H 8 

Johnny B. Sherrod Sr. 

Lawndale 



ERIC D. SIBLEY 

Mendel H S 
Eddie Sibley 
77th Street 



CELESTE SIMPSON 

Resurrection H.S. 

Malcolm Simpson 

West Shops 



JUNE. 1982 



13 




STEVEN LEE SMITH 

Fenger H S 
L.C. Smith 
Plant Maint. 



DAWN STIKA 

Kelly H.S. 
John Casillas 
South Shops 



VONDELL STINSON 

Simeon Vocational H-S- 

Hank Stinson 

Beverly 



NASER SULEIMAN 

Prosser Vocational H.S 
Husein Suleiman 
Travel Information 




CYNTHIA M. SZYMANSKI ADELPHE C. VAUGHN 

Northeastern Illinois Morgan Park H.S. 

Ted Szymanski Adolphe C. Vaughn 

Skokie Shop Washington Garage 



LaJEUNE VAUGHN 

St. Xavier 
Adolphe C. Vaughn 
Washington Garage 



SHERRI L. W^ASHINGTON 

Notre Dame 

Lovell Washington 

North Avenue 




LETRIC A. WATSON 

Corliss H.S. 
Otha Isaac 
77th Street 



ELLORY K. WEST 

Wendell H.S. 
Primes West 
West Section 



ROSEMARY WILLIAMS 

Luther South 

Herbert Williams 

Beverly 



KEITH A. WILLIS 

Bremen H.S. 

Richard U.Willis 

Public Affairs 




LINDA WINDHAI^ 

South Shore H.S. 

Andrew W. Windharr 

77th Street 



ERIC YABUSH 

Evanston H.S. 
Don Vabush 
Public Affairs 



LISA MARIE ZABIELSKI 

Elizabeth Seton H S 
Ed Zabielski 
Plant (i^alnt. 



Law for today 

Q. Can a landlord exclude chil- 
dren when renting property? 

A .Under the Illinois Human Rights 
Act it is a civil rights violation for 
the owner of rental property to re- 
quire that a prospective tenant not 
have children under the age of 14 
residing with the tenant or to insert 
any provision in a lease or agree- 
ment for rental terminating the 
lease should any children under 14 
reside in the family of the person 
holding the lease. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. As a sports fisherman, may I 
use a dip net to catch fish? 

A. Under the Fish Code 1971 any 
person possessing a valid sport 
fishing license may use a dip net to 
take carp, buffalo, carp suckers, or 
gizzard shad for personal con- 
sumption. However, the dip net 
may not be used to catch the 
above named fish within 100 feet 
of the base of any dam. Moreover, 
except as otherwise provided by 
law, the taking of any other game 
fish by dip net without a commer- 
cial license is a petty offense 
punishable by a minimum fine of 
$100 plus confiscation of the il- 
legally used equipment. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. Can a hospital refuse to pro- 
vide emergency service to a 
rape victim merely because 
the victim cannot pay for the 
services? 

A. No, under the Illinois Revised 
Statutes every hospital required to 
be licensed by the Department of 
Public Health which provides 
general medical or surgical hospital 
services must provide emergency 
hospital services to all alleged rape 
victims who apply for such treat- 
ment. 

Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I recently purchased some 
cigarettes from an individual 
for my personal use. After the 
purchase, I discovered there 
was no tax stamp on the 
package. Have I violated any 
laws? 

A. No, not unless you possess over 
100 unopened packages for 
resale. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Submit questions to: 
Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield. IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in columns. 
Personal answers not possible.) 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Safety 
Council 
honors CTA 

Four CTA bus garages and six other 
non-operating locations were reci- 
pients of awards from the Greater 
Chicago Safety Council recently for 
maintaining a lower accident frequen- 
cy in 1981 than in the previous year. 

The garages receiving the honor 
were Beverly, 52nd Street. North 
Avenue, and North Park. Cited for an 
over all reduction in industrial accident 
frequency among non-operating areas 
were all 10 CTA bus garages. 
Transportation Utility, Bus Shops, 
Buildings and Grounds, Materials 
Management, and General Office. 

The Greater Chicago Safety Coun- 
cil promotes safety among all 
organizations operating large fleets of 
vehicles within the Chicago area. 

Special recognition plaques from the 
Greater Chicago Safety Council honoring 
CTA's lower accident frequency in bus 
garages and non-operating locations were 
awarded to (from left) Mike Lacriola, 
Superintendent, North Avenue; John 
Hester, Assistant Superintendent, North 
Park; Eugene Hill, Acting Area Superinten- 
dent, Utility; Ward Chamberlain, Area 
Superintendent, Near South, and Flazell 
Moore, Assistant Superintendent, Bev- 
erly. Also in attendance (not holding 
plaques) were (from left) Edward Mitchell, 
Director, Training and Utility; James 
Shelton, Acting Superintendent, Utility; 
Robert Desvignes, Area Superintendent, 
Training and Instruction, and Edward 
Henry, Supervisor, Safety Performance 
Analysis. Not shown is Thomas D. Boyle, 
CTA Manager of Safety. 




Cited for special recognition by the Greater Chicago Safety Council for reduction in in 
dustrial accident frequency among non-operating CTA areas were (from left) John Boyce 
Safety Standards Specialist; Jim Dudley, Safety Supervisor; Walter Hallford, Superinten 
dent. Buildings and Grounds, Maintenance; C. L. Wiksten, Director, Facilities 
Maintenance; Al Martin, Superintendent, Buyers; Stuart Maginnis, Director, Support Ser- 
vices, and Dick Gross, Supervisor, Safety Programs and Standards. 





Lanita Montgomery, 18, the daughter of 
Barbara J. Montgomery of Accounts 
Payable, is a psychology major at 
Western Illinois University. She was 
graduated from Proviso East High School 
in June, 1980, where she was an honor stu- 
dent. 




Bobby Jean Jarrett, the daughter of 
Merline Mann, West Section Ticket Agent, 
was graduated June 27 from Chicago 
State University with an M.S. in Educa- 
tion, Library Science and Communica- 
tions Media. She formerly attended and 
was graduated from Carver High School in 
Brownsville, Tennessee, and attained a 
B.S. in Physical Education from Lane Col- 
lege in Jackson, Tennessee. She has been 
teaching 8th grade students at John 
Palmer School on the city's north side for 
the past nine years. 



JUNE, 1982 



15 



CTA at work 

The signs, they are a'changing 



PI signs, the Public Information 
signs that inform riders as to just which 
buses stop at each of some 13,000 
locations in the Chicago area, don't 
simply sprout like saplings in the 
spring. And when a bus route is 
changed, the alteration doesn't sud- 
denly appear on the signs like leaves 
on a tree. 

It all takes careful planning and 
coordination among several CTA 
departments, with the end result being 
a concise, accurate description of the 
route taken by the new or revised bus 
line, along with operating times. 

The route changes are initiated by 
the Routes & Systems section of the 
Operations Planning department, and 
work their way through Street Traffic 
and other Operations sections until 
they are submitted to the CTA Board 
for final approval. 

When printing is needed for a 
changed sign, the Graphics section of 
Operations Planning is called upon to 
create the necessary wording in the 
same space as the previous sign so the 
outdated information can be properly 
covered over. 

The graphics are then photo- 
graphed to make films that are sent to 
the Paint Shop at South Shops for 
screening so the message can be 
printed on adhesive-backed material. 

The process is the same for informa- 
tion printed onto new aluminum sign 
blanks, except that the new signs must 
also be varnished. Once the signs are 
completed, they are sent to West 
Shops so the Plant Maintenance 
department can assign laborer crews 
to put them up at the appropriate loca- 
tions. 

As soon as a sign installation request 




is received from the Street Traffic sec- 
tion. Sign Maintenance crews are sent 
out to do the most effective sign 
changing work possible with the man- 
power and time available. A change 
could affect anywhere from one to 
300 signs, depending on the change 
and the route. 

Since there are only two sign crews 
of two men each working at any time, 
and extremely cold weather prevents 




Tom Murphy, 97, a CTA retiree since 1952, 
and his wife, Jane, of Ttiousand Oaks, 
California, recently celebrated tfieir 59th 
wedding anniversary. Murphy is a former 
conductor viho was assigned to Kedzie. 
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy have five grand- 
children and four great-grandchildren. 
Their daughter, Mrs. Vita Sloyan, also of 
Thousand Oaks, was formerly employed 
in the CTA Claim Department. 



Changes are made on a PI sign on State 
Street at Roosevelt Road by Sign 
Maintenance Laborer Ray McGovern 
while co-worker Ralph DeMaria holds his 
ladder for safety. 

the adhesive from sticking when 
changes are made on existing signs, 
most of this type of work has to be 
done during the non-winter months. 

However, when extensive changes 
are made on a route during cold 
weather, new signs are manufactured 
at South Shops and installed as quick- 
ly as possible, weather notwith- 
standing. 

A continuing program of routine 
maintenance is carried out year- 
round. This provides for the repair or 
replacement of damaged signs and 
standards, when they are reported or 
encountered throughout the system. 

Whatever the reason, PI signs are 
constantly in need of attention, and 
CTA workmen, under the direction of 
the Street Traffic section, do their best 
to make sure the signs are in place and 
accurate so riders can be kept in- 
formed about the service on which 
they rely. 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



For ijour benefit 



Pre-Retirement option is a lot like insurance 



CTA's Pre-Retirement Surviving Spouse Option is an 
employee benefit available to legally married employees. 
Application for the option must be made through the Pen- 
sion Section. 

This lifetime of reduced monthly payments provides your 
surviving spouse with a pro-rated retirement income if you 
should die before reaching retirement. This income will be 
based on the wage earner's age, earnings, and the length of 
time the Pre-Retirement Option is in effect prior to the wage 
earner's death. 

If you choose the option and your spouse dies before 
you, notify the Pension Section and your latter benefits will 
be reduced based on the time your spouse was alive. 

If you live until retirement, the option will automatically be 
cancelled on your retirement date. The reduction will be ap- 
plied to your basic benefit. 

If you die before your spouse, or before your spouse col- 
lects a sum equal to what you contributed to the Plan plus 
interest, then the difference will be paid to your 
beneficiaries. 

Thus, choosing the option is a lot like providing life in- 
surance for both you and your spouse. You receive your 
pension payments if you live until retirement, or your 
spouse receives payments for life if you do not live until 
retirement. 



Likewise, there is a premium just as with insurance. In this 
case, you agree to accept a minimal deduction in the 
benefits which you otherwise would receive. This reduction 
is only a fraction of a percentage point for each month the 
option is in effect. The actual reduction is 3/ 100th of one 
per cent for each month the option is in effect up to the end 
of the month in which you reach 60 years of age . Beginning 
with the month after your 60th birthday, the reduction is 
4/ 100th of one per cent for each month the option is in ef- 
fect. 

Any employee choosing the Pre-Retirement Surviving 
Spouse Option may also cancel it at any time. In case of 
cancellation, the employee's future benefits will be reduced 
only for the time that the employee was enrolled in the op- 
tion. Active CTA employees with nearly 30 years of service 
are eligible to apply for the Surviving Spouse Option. Other- 
wise, the minimum eligibility is 55 years of age and three 
years of CTA service. 

If you would like more information about the Pre- 
Retirement Surviving Spouse Option, complete the form 
below and return it to: Retirement Plan for Chicago Transit 
Authority Employees, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 
3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654. You may also call the Pen- 
sion Section at 929-5750. 

(Next Month: Post-Retirement Options) 



Dear Mr. Ashley: 

I would like more information about the Pre-Retirement Surviving Spouse Option. So that you will know the details of 
my case, I am providing the following information: 



Middle Initial 



Address 



Social Security No. 
Worl< Location 



Home Plione No. 



Department _ 

Date of Birth 
of Employee 



I am considering 

Name of Spouse 

Date of Birtfi 
of Spouse 



„Work Location Phone No.^ 



.Occupation 



Badge or 
Payroll No. 



J^ge_ 



.as a probable retirement date. 



-Age_ 



Date of Marriage of 
Employee & Spouse 



JUNE, 1982 



CTA Senior Citizens 

announce officers, annual picnic 



The CTA Senior Citizens Retire- 
ment Organization will hold its annual 
picnic August 7 in National Grove No. 
2 at 2900 S Desplaines av.. North 
Riverside, Prizes, games, and 
refreshments will be available. Par- 
ticipants should bring their own picnic 
lunches. CTA employees and retirees 
and their friends are urged to attend. 
said Clarence Lind. organization presi- 
dent. 

The organization holds monthly din- 
ner dances, alternately on the north 
side and south side. For more infor- 
mation telephone 283-0486. or write 
the CTA Senior Citizens Retirement 
Organization. 5800 W. Eddy St.. 
Chicago. II.. 60634. 




Officers recently elected to fiead the CTA Senior Citizens Retirement Organization are 
(from left) Joe Nolan, General Manager; Jack Kalka, Secretary; Pete Dowdall, Treasurer; 
Clarence Lind, President; Bill Klecka, Assistant Treasurer; Harold Burda, Assistant 
Secretary and Andy Kohlstedt, 2nd Vice President. 



Mario Tricoci 
retires 

Friends, relatives, and co-workers 
attended a retirement reception, held 
in the Travel Information Center on 
May 28 to honor Mario Tricoci. Travel 
Information Representative whose 
retirement became effective June 1. 
Tricoci, a CTA employee for 27 years, 
began his career in 1945 as a conduc- 
tor. Subsequently, he held jobs in the 
Maintenance Department as a Material 
Handler, and the Internal Auditing 
Department where he was Audit Clerk 
II/Field Audit Clerk. He joined the 
RTA Travel information Center in 
1974 where he remained until his 
retirement. Tricoci (third from left) 
pauses for the photographer on the 
memorable occasion with (from left) 
his son. Mario J. Tricoci: daughter. 
Mrs. Rosanne McGuin; wife. Mrs. 
Dorothy Tricoci. and daughters Ann 
Marie and JoAnne Tricoci. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



JOINING THE ranks 
of the retired on 
June 1 was BEN- 
JAMIN ZENTMYER, 
who had more than 
40 years of service 
witii CTA and its 
predecessor com- 
panies. 



ROBERT BARRETT, Carpenter. 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 9-11-50 
JOHN BONNER, Rail Janitor, 

Maintenance. Emp. 11-3-60 
ANTHONY BOSCO, Lineman, 

West Shops, Emp. 11-11-46 
ANTHONY CONROY, Carpenter, 

West Shops, Emp. 7-17-50 
BOBBY CULBERTSON, Pol Lieut., 

Human Resources, Emp. 3-11-54 
WILBERT DALTON. Operator. 

Beverly, Emp 5-20-52 




IVO DiPlERO, Carpenter Frmn., 

Skokie Shop. Emp, 9-20-45 
HERSTON GANDY. Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 10-9-51 
GERALD JACOB, Operator. 

North Park. Emp. 5-6-52 
STANLEY KAMINSKI, Mtrl. Disp, L 

West Shops, Emp. 2-24-47 
TIMOTHY KEARNEY. Ticket Agent. 

Central Assignment. Emp. 5-19-61 
JOHN ROGER. Ticket Agent. 

South Section. Emp. 1-12-54 
MURRAY LEIBOVITZ. Motorman. 

West Section. Emp. 8-13-48 
STEVEN NOWAK. Conductor. 

West Section, Emp, 10-27-47 
GERALD PHILLIPS. Carpenter, 

Skokie Shop, Emp, 12-10-45 
THEODORE RAYMOND Jr . Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 11-21-57 
TERENCE REGAN. Box Puller, 

North Avenue. Emp, 1-11-46 
SAM SALAMONE. Lineman. 

West Shops. Emp, 12-5-47 
STANLEY SARNA. Technician III. 

South Shops, Emp, 3-1-50 
FRED SIMMONS, Bus & Truck Mech,. 

South Shops. Emp 2-4-49 
RAY SMITH. Car Repairer. 

98th Street. Emp 5-21-51 



HERBERT STRAUCH. Operator. 

Archer. Emp, 4-15-46 
ROGER THOMPSON. Operator. 

Lawndale. Emp, 3-4-63 
MARIO TRICOCI. Travel Info Rep . 

Consumer Services. Emp 8-28-45 
HERBERT UEDELHOFEN. Supervisor. 

District D. Emp, 11-17-60 
CARLO VERBAN. Placement. 

Human Resources. Emp, 4-23-74 
GEORGE WALLACE. Operator, 

Archer, Emp, 11-16-45 
HERBERT WILLIAMS. Switchbd, Oper, 

77th Street. Emp, 4-19-51 
RICHARD WILSON. Carpenter. 

Skokie Shop. Emp, 4-7-47 
ELRATE WOOLFOLK. Operator, 

77th Street. Emp, 11-9-78 
BENJAMIN ZENTMYER. Box Puller, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 4-27-42 



DISABILFTY RETIREMENTS 

JIMMIE HARDY. Operator. 

77th Street. Emp, 9-5-63 
DAVE MAYBERRY. Ticket Agent. 

Central Assignment. Emp, 2-18-60 



I3Sr 3VEE3V[OFg.I.A.3VE 

CHARLES BERNDT. 77. Kedzie. 

Emp, 10-16-46, Died 4-2-82 
HERBERT BEYER, 79, Lawndale, 

Emp, 10-23-19, Died 4-7-82 
ROBERT BLYTH. 69. West Section. 

Emp 1-13-42. Died 4-3-82 
BOHUMIL BROUSIL. 64. West Section. 

Emp. 10-16-41. Died 4-4-82 
WILLIAM CAREY. 87. 61st Street. 

Emp. 8-17-22. Died 4-4-82 
CORNELIUS CROWLEY. 86. Transportation, 

Emp 9-21-18, Died 4-7-82 
EDWARD DAPPEN, 69, Limits, 

Emp, 7-14-37, Died 4-17-82 
BRUNO DRUEKE, 81, Skokie Shop, 

Emp 6-23-42. Died 3-29-82 
MARCUS FIORE. 63. Forest Park. 

Emp, 8-15-41, Died 4-2-82 



JOAN FITZGERALD, 55, Admn, Services, 

Emp 12-7-49, Died 5-26-82 
JERRY GLEASON, 78, Beverly, 

Emp 12-28-26, Died 4-4-82 
ARTHUR GROSS. 87. Devon. 

Emp 5-12-21. Died 4-12-82 
JULIUS JACKlEWiCZ. 80. Archer. 

Emp 1-20-26. Died 4-24-82 
FRANK MADOCK. 83. Transportation, 

Emp. 2-26-23. Died 4-9-82 
LOUIS MARCINEK. 73. Lawndale. 

Emp. 9-4-47. Died 4-5-82 
BRUNO MATUSZAK. 89. Devon. 

Emp. 2-17-26. Died 4-3-82 
RUDOLPH MAU. 90. Way & Structs,. 

Emp 11-9-21. Died 4-21-82 
JOHN MELODY. 70. Limits. 

Emp 11-12-41. Died 4-13-82 
JAMES NOLAN. 70. West Section. 

Emp 11-7-45. Died 4-30-82 



WILLIAM O'BRIEN. 68. District B. 

Emp 8-17-36. Died 4-25-82 
JOHN PRINZ. 82. North Park. 

Emp. 4-14-43. Died 3-31-82 
GEORGE ROSS. 72. South Section, 

Emp 3-5-51, Died 4-24-82 
FRED SCHWARTZ, 88, Stores, 

Emp, 8-23-20, Died 4-30-82 
PATRICK SCULLY, 74, Archer. 

Emp 8-30-43. Died 4-30-82 
JOHN SMITH. 85. Way & Structs,. 

Emp, 6-29-18. Died 4-21-82 
WILLIAM STAPLETON. 76. BIdg, Maint 

Emp 8-17-44. Died 4-1-82 
GEORGE VIKERAS. 63. Mtrls Mgmt.. 

Emp. 4-29-46. Died 4-26-82 



Service anniversaries in June 



35 years 



Helen Doherty, Maintenance 
David Guereca, Skokie Shop 
Raymond Laskowski, Skokie Shop 
Frank Wlsniewski, North Avenue 



30 years 



Bemadette Kizior, Engineering 
Lewis Taylor, Beverly 
Samuel Vaughan, Claims 
Mario ZIocchi, Skokie Shop 



25 years 



Donald Baber, Central Counting 
Lawyer Durr, Utility 
Harold Hirsch, Operations Planning 
Anthony Kemp, North Avenue 
Alvin Norris, 52nd Street 
Lloyd Ramsey, Maintenance 
l^rliss Robeznicks, Central District 
Randolph Stewart, 77th Street 
John Wallace, Control Center 
William Ward, 77th Street 
Charles Williams. 69th Street 
Herbert Williams, Beverly 
Steven Zellner, Electrical 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Volume 35 



Number 6 

Publlsried for employees and retirees of tlie CTA by 
tlie External Affairs Division, Michael N. Horowitz, 
Manager. 

Editorial and grapfilcs by tlie Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yatiusti 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



JUNE, 1982 




Mexican government dignitary visits CTA 



Atty. Jorge Ramon Quinones Ruiz, Vice-President of the 
Zapopan Municipality of tfie Mexican State of Jalisco, visited CTA 
on May 25 as part of fiis tour of major U.S. cities in a Mexican- 
government sponsored study of public transportation systems. 



Sfiown witli Mr. Ruiz are (from left) Harold H. Geissenheimer, 
Manager of General Operations, and Elda Leal, Media Coor- 
dinator, Public Affairs Department, wlio acted as co-tiosts and 
provided information about CTA. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago. Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 




Govt, Publications Department 
Wortliweytorn University Library 
iivaiuton, XL 60201 



-fey, M.A.N. . 



'ic^i^O //^u. 'U i n ' -' I ^' ■ "f ' -^ 




New 'Big Bend' debuts 
at Amtrak display 

A prototype of the CTA's order of 125 new "Big Bend" 
articulated buses was shown for the first time July 17-18 in 
Amtrak's Family Days equipment display in the parking lot 
at Roosevelt Road east of Michigan Avenue. 

One of the 20 lift-equipped Special Services buses for the 
mobility-limited being used in the Access Transportation 
program was also on display, along with CTA's historic 
White Motor Bus. Access Transportation serves 3,300 peo- 
ple who are certified to use the dial-a-ride vehicles. 

Mayor Jane Byrne who had an early look at the new ar- 
ticulated bus prototype on July 16 when it was pulled in 
front of City Hall, expressed satisfaction with the vehicles 
being purchased for CTA riders. 

The new buses are similar to the CTA's fleet of 20 "Big 
Bend" buses already in operation, and include some 
engineering refinements. Purchased at a contract price of 
$33,731,250 ($269,850 each), the new vehicles are being 
built by the M.A.N. Truck and Bus Corporation of 
Southfield, Mich. Delivery, scheduled to begin in 



Top: Amtrak trains and coaches as well as CTA buses stood ready 
for the general public's Inspection near Michigan avenue on 
Amtrak's Family Day. 

Left: A prototype of the articulated buses being manufactured by 
M.A.N. Truck and Bus Corporation of Southfield, Mich., was a 
main feature on display during Amtrak's Family Day. 

Right: Mayor Jane Byrne, escorted by CTA Public Affairs/Con- 
sumer Services Group Manager Michael N. Horowitz, makes an In- 
spection ride on the new articulated bus. 

September, is expected to be completed in March, 1983. 

The buses were ordered with funds from an Interstate 
Transfer Grant from federal and state governments. 

The diesel-powered, 55-foot-long articulated buses have 
seating for 66 riders and can accommodate more than 100 
people. The standard CTA bus is 40 feet long and seats 50 
riders. 

The 125 new buses have five power vents in the ceiling to 
assist in providing a comfortable environment for riders. 

(Continued on page 2) 

FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

JULY, 1982 




From the Chairman 

Abuse of benefits 

The transit industry has always been recognized as one of 
the best places to work in Chicago as a result of the excellent 
salaries and benefits provided for employees. 

As CTA employees, not only do you receive one of the 
highest rates of pay throughout the transit industry, but you 
are also assured of financial security during your career and 
retirement through our benefit program. You know that you 
will be able to enjoy your retirement with a generous pen- 
sion, and you know that you will receive assistance in times 
of crisis through our excellent medical, dental, and vision 
care programs. CTA has done everything possible in ac- 
cordance with contemporary business and industrial prac- 
tices to provide for the welfare of its employees. 

Therefore, I am appalled at the alarming increase in 
Workers Compensation claims that have been filed against 
CTA in recent years. The cost of these claims to CTA, both 
in terms of direct payment to individuals and increased 
operating costs required to assure continuity of services dur- 
ing employee absences, are unreasonable in an industry 
where modern equipment design and revised work rules 
and safety procedures have produced a much safer work 
environment. 

I fully expect all CTA employees to take an active interest 
in the reduction of Workers Compensation claims filed 
against CTA. All employees must perform their jobs safely 
and carefully, and all supervisors must strictly enforce every 
work rule with special emphasis on rules concerning safety. 

I have also directed our Workers Compensation section to 
identify those claimants, and 1 am sure there are only a few, 
who have been found to be repeaters. They will be dealt 
with severely. 

By reducing the amount of Workers Compensation 
claims to a reasonable level, we can apply a significant 
amount of funds directly to providing more service for our 
riders, which could create more employment opportunities. 
This one step toward achievement will mean great savings, 
increased cost effectiveness, and additional pride to CTA. 




'Big Bend' at Amtrak 

(continued from page 1) 

Noting that the CTA's current fleet of 20 articulated buses 
has been in operation since February, 1979, CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardiili said, "As part of the CTA's testing pro- 
gram, the 20 buses have been operated on various heavily- 
traveled routes throughout Chicago. They have proven to 
be cost-efficient and qualified for the needs of the CTA's 
riders in all types of weather." 

On Sunday, July 18, CTA Culture Buses made special 
stops near the Amtrak display. Culture Bus flyers and other 
CTA publications were distributed on CTA's display vehicles 
and aboard the trains throughout the weekend event. 




Family Day visitors also saw a scale model of the new rapid 
transit car Included in the inventory of new equipment for CTA 
riders. 




Special Service Operators Melvin Perry (left), and James Briley, 
explain the special features Included on buses designed to serve 
mobility-limited riders to Family Day visitors. 



CTA Chairman Michael Cardllll (right), and Tim Bresnahan (left), 
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 134, 
Business Manager, sign agreement reached last month extending 
the electrical workers' union contract to November 30, 1984. 
Other participants In the labor agreement were (from left) Burton 
Van Wetering, Business Representative, Local 134; Nick Burkard, 
IBEW, Local 9, Business Manager, and Bob Plerson, IBEW, Local 
9, Business Representative. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Operator 
shares pride 
with community 



Evanston Bus Operator Frank Ip- 
polito put his money where his pride 
is. He is proud to be an Evanston bus 
operator, and a resident of the City of 
Evanston. 

When the Evanston Fourth of July 
association recently announced that it 
needed a bus to carry a group of 
young sports contest winners and 
some adults in its 6'lst annual parade 
on Central Street, Ippolito chartered 
and paid for.a Big Bend articulated bus 
to be in the parade on July 5. 

Because the parade route stretched 
several miles, and the parade usually 
moves slowly, Ippolito knew his 
young, tired athletes would get thirsty. 

He contacted an Evanston soft drink 
bottling company and told them his 
plight. The company donated eight 
cases of various-flavored soft drinks 
for the youngsters. 

Soft drinks have to be cold to be 
good — and the temperature . was 
forecast to be in the upper 80's on July 
5. Ippolito contacted a Skokie liquor 
store, which provided a number of 
large metal cans and 100 pounds of 
ice cubes. 

The bus arrived on July 5 and was 
equipped with a public address 
system. "I taped a small portable radio 
onto the P. A. system's microphone 
and tuned the radio to station WNUR- 
FM, the Northwestern University stu- 
dent station, which was broadcasting 
descriptions of the parade," Ippolito 
said. 

"The kids loved being in the parade. 
Even more, they loved hearing a radio 
description of the big CTA bus carry- 
ing them in the parade, as I drove the 
bus past the parade's reviewing stand 
and WNUR's broadcasting table. 

"I was so thrilled for the kids I got 
goosebumps and misty-eyed," Ip- 
polito said. 

Ippolito later received a Special 
Recognition Award plaque from the 
association's Celebration Manager, Ed 
Hawley, and Assistant Celebration 
Manager, Curtis Chancellor. 

Hawley and Chancellor praised Ip- 




Bus Operator Frank Ippolito (above). North Park garage, proudly displays American flag 
on the articulated bus that he chartered for Independence Day parade in Evanston on 
July 5 (below). 




Young sports contest winners enjoy their ride on the bus in the parade. 



polito for his valuable contribution to What about next year's Fourth of 

the parade. The CTA bus was one of July parade in Evanston? 

109 entries in the two and a half hour "I'll be back," Ippolito vowed. "The 

long parade. kids need me." 



JULY, 1982 



CTA at work 

Carpenters' 
talents show 
endless variety 



You see the results of their work 
every day, but you probably never 
realized it was CTA's own carpenters 
who did the job— from making pic- 
ture frames to remodeling building 
interiors. 

Since they are constantly in demand 
throughout the system, carpenters have 
work locations not only at West Shops, 
but also in rail shop areas at 61st Street 
yard and at 1117 W. Wilson. 

Reporting to Walter Hallford, 
Superintendent, Buildings/ Grounds, 
the 48 carpenters have as their unit 
supervisor Joseph Fucarino, a 22-year 
veteran of CTA service. They serve 
under the direct supervision of three 
foremen and two assistant foremen. 

While a substantial amount of their 
work involves repairs and other 
maintenance functions, carpenters 
also create a considerable variety of 
new items that are used daily at every 
level of CTA operations. 

Station signs on over 140 rapid trans- 
it platforms are among the more 
noticeable results of carpenters" work. 
So too are the concrete base pads for 
the 500 shelters built for waiting bus 
riders. 

At Washington garage, which was 
converted from an automobile 
showroom into CTA's Special Services 




bus dispatch center and garage, 
carpenters built a console that runs 
through the entire office area. They 
also created a computer room and built 
dividing walls in the transportation sec- 
tion that reach from floor to ceiling. 

In the Central Counting office at 
South Shops, CTA carpenters are 
modernizing the second floor of the 
facility to provide more space and 
amenities for the money-counting staff. 

Last fall, carpenters redecked four 
stations on the Ravenswood rapid 
transit route. They not only ripped out 
and replaced all wooden decking at the 
Chicago, Irving Park, Montrose, and 
Damen Avenue stations, but also 
rebuilt platform supports. In 
1980-1981, they rebuilt the wooden 
footwalk around the entire Loop 'L' 
structure . 

CTA's carpenters 
formed their fastest 



may 
feat 



have per- 
of station 



rehabilitation in November, 1980, 



when a fire at the end of the evening 
rush period destroyed most of the 
platform at Kedzie on the Ravens- 
wood route. Some 125 feet of plat- 
form and canopy were burned in the 
fire, which also scorched the street- 
level agent's booth. 

Responding to the call for help, 
carpenters from throughout the unit 
headed to the Kedzie station after lit- 
tle more than a few moments' rest at 
home. Some were already tearing 
away the burnt platform while 
firemen were still on the scene. 

Others set up work benches so new 
timbers brought in from the 61st Street 
yard could be sawed to the sizes needed 
for installation in a new structure. 
Meanwhile, lights were strung up to 
allow repair crews to work through the 
night. 

And work they did. Despite an all- 
night drizzle, the carpenters worked 
steadily, replacing bracing. cross- 




Quick reconstruction work by CTA carpenters allowed reopening of the Kedzie station on 
the Ravenswood route the morning after a flash fire had destroyed most of the platform 
and canopied areas. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



One of many typical projects performed 
by CTA carpenters found Ralph GorskI Jr. 
(left) and Nolan Krollckl securing the edge 
of a section of new flooring at the 
Adams/Wabash 'L' station. 



bracing and platform timbers. By the 
time the first four-car train arrived 
from Kimball at dawn, the new plat- 
form was finished, and morning rush- 
period riders were all but unaffected 
by the previous night's dilemma. 

Besides such major efforts as the 
emergency reconstruction of Kedzie 
station, office remodeling, and other 
more traditional woodworking jobs, 
CTA carpenters also perform 
passenger safety and revenue-related 
maintenance functions. 

All locking devices in subway exit 
doors and on rapid transit agents' 
booths are maintained by CTA 
carpenters. So are the overhead wood- 
paneled doors at bus or rail shops and 
garages. There are also some 50 stores 
and other rental property leased by 
CTA around rapid transit stations that 
carpenters must maintain. 

If a station or garage window is 
stuck or broken, CTA carpenters will 
most likely be called upon for repairs. 
It is also the carpenters' responsibility 
to mount fire extinguishers in CTA 
buildings and to fabricate flag staffs 
for slow zone signs used by other 
maintenance people on the rapid 
transit system. 

The variety of jobs carpenters do is 
endless. Recently they were replacing 
the flooring on the mezzanine of the 
Adams/Wabash Loop 'L' station 
with black-ribbed rubber over plank- 
ing, repairing the stairs at Halsted 
station on the Lake/ Dan Ryan route, 
and erecting temporary barriers at 
Loyola on the North-South mainline. 

Whether it's a picture frame or a 
shelf, a station platform or an office 
partition, CTA's carpenters can do it 
all. There are no limits to their talents 
or ability to improvise where the 
situation requires, and they are ready 
to roll at a moment's notice. 



Building a 'nest egg' 

through deferred compensation 



Taxes and economic uncertainties 
make it very difficult to accumulate a 
"nest egg" these days, but it is more 
important today than ever before. 

The CTA Deferred Compensation 
Plan is one of the best financial plans 
available to help CTA employees ac- 
complish this goal. It is a benefit which 
gives public employees relief from cur- 
rent federal or state income taxes on a 
portion of their salary which they 
voluntarily set aside for investment. 

The money invested by CTA 
employees through Deferred Com- 
pensation establishes a larger fund for 
future use by the investor than would 
otherwise be possible through saving 
"after tax" dollars. The amount the 
employee chooses to set aside is 
deducted before the taxes are 
deducted. The interest, dividend, or 
profit is also calculated on the "before 
tax" dollars. Thus, the money which 
would ordinarily be spent for taxes 
earns more money for the investor. 

The deferred tax is paid when the 
funds are withdrawn, usually when the 
investor is not working and the tax rate 
(tax bracket) is lower. However, due 
to earnings on the retained tax dollars, 
the employee will be ahead even if the 
tax rate at withdrawal is the same as it 
is now. 

Many CTA employees have taken 
advantage of the recent pension 
deduction suspension to either enroll 
in the Defened Compensation Plan, 
or to increase their savings through the 
plan. The average enrollee may have 
more than $105 per pay period 
deposited into the Deferred Compen- 
sation Plan, yet their take-home pay is 
the same as it was before pension 
deductions were curtailed. 

Enrollment in Deferred Compensa- 
tion is open for as little as one per cent 
of the employee's base pay. The max- 
imum that may be deducted is 25 per 
cent, or $7,500 annually, whichever is 
least. One may increase, decrease, or 
freeze Deferred Compensation savings 
at any time, but only once within a 
calendar year. Participants may also 
choose from a variety of plans in 
which to invest their money as well as 
change investment accounts as their 
objectives change. 

The withdrawal of funds may begin 
at any age upon termination of 
employment, whether it be retirement 
or not. Funds may also be withdrawn 
by active employees to cover unex- 
pected emergencies or total disability. 



However, such request must have the 
approval of the CTA's five-member 
Compensation Board. 

Norma Finley, Deferred Compensa- 
tion Committee Secretary, explained 
that the withdrawal of funds by active 
employees must be in accordance with 
federal guidelines as established by the 
Internal Revenue Service. "We try as 
much as possible to maintain the in- 
tegrity of the Deferred Compensation 
Plan," Ms. Finley said. "At the same 
time, the employee facing a real 
emergency is given every considera- 
tion." 

The board has processed 92 ap- 
plications for the withdrawal of funds 
to cover emergencies since last 
December, Ms. Finley reported. 
Deferred Compensation participants 
who wish to make such withdrawals 
should contact Intangible Marketing, 
Inc., administrators of the plan, for an 
application. The form should be filled 
out and returned to Intangible 
Marketing for consideration. 

Ms. Finley said that applicants 
should also support their request with 
receipts or other documents to 
substantiate their need for their money 
from the Deferred Compensation 
Plan. Intangible Marketing will recom- 
mend approval or disapproval of the 
request to the CTA's Deferred Com- 
pensation Committee. However, since 
the committee has the final authority, 
it reviews each case thoroughly before 
making its decision. Although each 
case is different, most applications 
have been submitted primarily 
because of illness or uninsured loss. 

An Intangible Marketing represent- 
ative said that due to the favorable tax 
treatment and the excellent returns 
available to Deferred Compensation 
monies, most participants use other 
savings, or their "lazy money"--money 
earning lower rates of return with no 
tax benefits--to meet emergencies 
before turning to funds set aside 
through Deferred Compensation. 

A plan representative is available to 
CTA employees on a regularly 
scheduled basis at each CTA work 
location to assist anyone wishing to ex- 
amine the Deferred Compensation 
Plan or enroll in the program. CTA 
employees may also call Intangible 
Marketing, Inc., for information at 
263-1662. 



JULY, 1982 



Robert Smith (Forest Glen 
garage) was praised by Hazel 
Lunsford, of Sheffield 
Avenue, for helping two elder- 
ly women who had fallen one 
evening into the path of his 
No. 152 Addison bus. "One 
woman had tripped and 
pulled the other down with 
her. They were lying in the 
street on their backs. One in 
terror tried to wave her cane. 
The driver stopped quickly, 
and both he and a passenger 
jumped out, ran and helped 
them. Fortunately, neither 
was hurt. Both the driver and 
the man took them across the 
street to their building, where 
other residents took over. 
Certainly the driver is a fine 
man." 




Anthony Gage (South Sec- 
tion) was commended for "a 
job well done" by Charles 
Clyburn, of Greenwood 
Avenue, a rider on his 
Lake/Dan Ryan train. "I have 
observed this conductor on 
several occasions, and he 
has always conducted 
himself in a helpful but firm 
and professional manner. In 
one incident, there was an at- 
tempted robbery on the train. 
He did not hesitate to enter 
into the situation, and at- 
tempted to apprehend the 
robbers. He also consoled 
the passengers, who were 
visibly shaken by the event. 
This is only one example of 
his dedication to the comfort 
and safety of his riders." 



commendation corner 



Leroy Carr (Forest Glen garage) "is great." according to 
Jack Stein, of North Major Avenue, a regular rider on his 
No. 88 Higgins bus. "1 have yet to see him without a smile 
on his face, and not only is he super-friendly, he is also 
humorous. He is constantly saying funny stuff while waiting 
to leave Jefferson Park station. Even people who get on 
with a scowl on their face are either laughing or at least smil- 
ing by the time they leave. Never has the driver anything 
bad to say even if the weather is bad. Just wanted you folks 
to know you really do have some good people working for 
you. It is always a pleasure to ride with No. 4629." 



Helen Edu/ards (North Section) was called "an extraor- 
dinary employee of the CTA" by Lari Shield, of Evanston, 
for the way she handles her duties as a ticket agent at South 
Boulevard "This woman does her best every morning to 
brighten the days of all who pass by her window. She has a 
warm smile, tapes notes of good cheer to her window, and 
offers a friendly 'Have a nice day' rain or shine. By adding 
this personal touch to her job. she truly makes commuting a 
more pleasant experience. Thank you from myself and 
others who have come to appreciate this outstanding 
woman." 



Walter Lewis Jr. (North Park garage) was appreciated by 
Heather Kerr, of North Michigan Avenue, for coming to the 
assistance of a rider on his No. 146 Marine/Michigan Ex- 
press bus. "A woman in a window seat began complaining 
of assault by the man next to her, Mr. Lewis stopped the bus 
to investigate, and recognized the obviously intoxicated man 
as a repeat offender. The man attempted to escape through 
the front exit. After hastily calling for help on the radio 
phone. Mr. Lewis bravely blocked the offender's way. refus- 
ing to allow him to exit until police arrived." 



Theodore King and Michael Powell (North Section) 
were thanked by Kathleen Evans, of Elston Avenue, for 
responding to her calls for help on a Ravenswood train. 
"The motorman (King) jumped off the train and over a 
fence to help a woman I had seen fall backwards down the 
stairs in a station. It made me feel really good to see 
someone who cared about others. The conductor is another 
wonderful employee. He is always cheerful and helpful, and 
makes everyone laugh with his humorous comments. He 
kept the rest of the passengers informed as to what was go- 
ing on as we waited for the motorman to help the woman." 



John Golden Jr. (North Park garage) was cited by K. B 
Chamberlain, the Police Chief of Skokie. for assisting a 
woman who was attacked by another rider on his No. 97 
Skokie bus. "After responding to a call of a woman being 
beaten on a CTA bus. officers of this department found that 
a subject who is presently under psychiatric care had at- 
tacked a passenger without provocation on the bus The 
driver immediately went to the aid of the passenger. 
Without regard for his personal safety. Mr Golden subdued 
the offender and held him for police." 



Jessie Gilmore (77th Street garage) is regarded as "such a 
courteous gentleman" by Dorothy Price, of Rhodes 
Avenue, who is a frequent rider on his No 4 Cottage Grove 
bus. "If he sees a lady coming and he has closed the door, 
he will open it. During the winter, when the weather is very 
bad. he will wait a second while you are crossing the street. 
This driver should be commended for his understanding. 1 
am just one of the ladies that ride on his bus." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees honored with *A Day in CTA' 



A Beverly bus operator who 
rescued a passenger being attacked by 
two armed men on May 21 has been 
honored with "A Day in CTA." 

Kenneth Norrington, a CTA Bus 
Operator since 1978. is credited with 
"acting without regard for his personal 
safety" as he confronted two men who 
were attacking a passenger with a 
knife as they rode his westbound 95th 
Street bus. The victim later credited 
Norrington with saving his life. 

Other "Day in CTA" honorees were 
Marilyn Reyes, a Bus Operator as- 
signed to North Park garage, and Alex 
Lacey, a District 'D' Pool Supervisor 
Ms. Reyes, a 1981 Bus Roadeo semi- 
finalist, found an expensive gold 
watch of extraordinary sentimental 
value which was returned to its owner. 
Supervisor Lacey, who observed a hit 
and run accident on May 8 which 
resulted in a fatality, notified Chicago 
police and firemen and chased the of- 
fender. Lacey was able to get the 
license number of the vehicle involved 
which aided police in their investiga- 
tion. 




Recipients of "A Day in CTA" honors display the special recognition certificates 
presented to them during a brief visit with CTA management at the t\1erchandise Mart. 
The honorees are (from left) Kenneth Norrington, Beverly garage; tWarilyn Reyes, North 
Park garage, and Alex Lacey, District D Pool Supervisor. Making the presentations is 
Samuel Smith (third from left). Special Assistant to Transportation Manager James Blaa. 



Thanks — for a job well done 



Louis Berry, North Avenue 
Rudy Boffro, Forest Glen 
Nathaniel Bradford, 69th Street 
Thomas Brooks, North Avenue 
Matthew Brownlee, District D 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Charlie Caldwell, 69th Street 
Noel Castro, North Park 
Felicia Clower, Limits 
Marvin Covington, Limits 
Carlos Custodio, Forest Glen 

Victor Davila, North Park 
Mellonese Dorris, North Avenue 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 
Wilfred DuPree, North Park 

Eugene Embry, Ashland Terminal 

David Gaston, North Park 
William Glispie, Archer 
Patrick Goins, 77th Street 
Dionisio Gonzalez, North Park 
Ramon Gonzalez, Transp. Admn. 
Willie Goodes Jr., 77th Street 



Undraius Hall, Limits 
Belinda Hayes, Forest Glen 
Dwayne Hutton, 77th Street 

Derek James, Ashland Terminal 

Bahram Khavari, North Park 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Hollis Lewis Jr., North Avenue 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 

William Mack, North Park 
Juan Mercado, North Park 
Kermit Mitchell Jr., North Avenue 
Nelson Morales, North Park 
Jose Mulero, North Park 
Faye Murray, Limits 

Kenneth Norrington, Beverly 

Florinda Orcasitas, Archer 
Dianna Owens, North Park 



Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listinq 

Antonio Patterson, Forest Glen 
Isaac Price, Lawndale 

Frederick Ragsdale, North Park 
Willie Rice, Archer 
Rafael Rivera, North Park 
Chester Robertson, North Park 

Maria Salazar, 69th Street 
Pablo Silva, Limits 
Leevon Skinner, 69th Street 

Blanca Torres, Forest Glen 

Renato Ugartechea, North Avenue 

Howard Walker, Archer 
Mitchell Ware, 69th Street 
Ethel Wilson, Archer 
Howard Wilson, Forest Glen 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



JULY. 1982 



Winning Circle *2(y 
Bus Roadeo Winners 

"The Roadeo is a plateau of achievement foj every 
operator. It takes professionalism, skill, and a little bit 
of luck as well. 

"The Roadeo is set up to require some things that are 
not done on the street, but it's fair because we require it 
of everyone. It's a win-win situation because there are no 
losers." 

Edward Mitchell, Director, Training-Utility 

"The second annual bus Roadeo was even better than 
the first. Our finest operators met in friendly competi- 
tion, and they all emerged as winners. Once again, CTA 
will be well represented at the international competition 
in Boston." 

Elonzo Hill, Bus Roadeo Co-Chairman 

"More operators competed in this year's event, thus it 
was more difficult to be among those in the 'Winning 
Cii:cle 20'. As always, there were many others who 
volunteered their services on their days off to help with 
this successful Roadeo. I thank them for their spirit of 
teamwork which made us successful." 

Paul Kadowaki, Bus Roadeo Co-Chairman 




Executive Director Bernard J. Ford was among CTA managers 
meeting at Limits and other garages to congratulate 1982 Bus 
Roadec participants. Honorees Included Willie Whisenton who 
displays a certificate and special Roadeo hat which was 
presented to each contestant. Whisenton, who made the 1981 
"Winning Circle 20," Is also included in this year's circle of top 20 
operators In competition. Others on hand for "Roadeo '82" 
presentations were (from left): Harry Reddrick, Director, Transpor- 
tation Personnel; Harold Gelssenheimer, General Operations 
Manager, and Edward Mitchell, Director, Training and Utility. 




Robert Richardson - North 

Park — Skill and determination 
put Richardson in first place 
with 581 points. "Once you 
qualify, the real job begins," 
said the man who finished third 
in the 1981 competition with 
603 points "Driving is 
something 1 look at as an art. I 
enjoy driving a bus and working 
with people. 1 intend to win the 
Internationa 



Alvin Tritthardt - Forest 

Glen — A newcomer who had 
no idea that he would place in 
the top 20, Tritthardt ranks 
fourth with 561 points. "It's cer- 
tainly something different from 
the usual day-in and day-out 
routine. It's something to talk 
about." 



Ladell Jackson - North 

Avenue — "The Roadeo is 
motivational because it makes 
you want to do better I see a lot 
of people really trying to make it 
into the Roadeo. I think it helps 
a lot of operators. I know it's 
better than driving on the street 
to prove yourself." Jackson fin- 
ished 12th with 505 points 



Tommy Ross - Forest Glen 

— "Just as 1 said last year, the 
Bus Roadeo is a very worthy 
event. It has great value as a 
morale booster, and it is a 
challenge to bus operators." 
Ross ..nished 15th with 489 
points. A member of the 1981 
Winning Circle, he finished 
seventh in that competition with 
575 points 




Joe Rodenski - Forest Glen 

— "I thought it was pretty easy 
to get in the top 20. but now I'm 
aiming for at least the top three 
in the finals Maybe I'll have a bit 
more practice by then I know 
where I made my mistakes" 
Rodenski ranked ninth with 532 
points. 



Michael Matas - Forest Glen 

— "I feel that I really missed out 
last year because the Roadeo is 
really a good thing You get to 
see how good you are as you 
drive through tight situations, 
especially maneuvers such as 
the Y-back It's a healthy thing 
for dnvers to do " Matas fin- 
ished 11th with 513 points 



John Odom - 69th Street - 

"This is a lot of fun I wanted to 
participate this time because I 
have 22 years of service, and I 
figured with that many years. I 
should have the expenence for 
this sort of thing I'm glad I 
made the top 20 I sure had fun 
doing it " Odom finished 17th 
with 486 points 



Eugene Tate - Lawndale — 'I 

like the competition because it 
lets you use your own judg- 
ment. If I had known it was like 
this I would have entered the 
Roadeo last year. I'm looking 
forward to the finals, and I'm 
out to beat everyone," Tate 
finished sixth i the Winning 
Circle 20 with 550 points 



William Spencer - Archer — 

"It was jusi like the Roadeo last 
year---a lot of fun. 1 was in the 
top 20 then, but only after 
someone was eliminated. 
Originally. I had finished in the 
21st spot. 1 find the tennis balls 
to be the most difficult 
maneuver because 1 can never 
make it through there clean. 
This year it was even more dif- 
ficult." Spencer finished 13th 
with 498 points 



Orval I. Porter - Lawndale — 

"It's a tough course. It was just 
as tough this year as it was last 
year " Porter called the 90 
degree left turn and the right 
Y-back the toughest part of the 
course "I don't think anyone 
can do a Y-back safely with only 
one reverse. You have to take a 
second reverse It's a good thing 
for the drivers who have com- 
peted to recognize that we run 
into these things every day" 
Porter finished fifth with 553 
points, down from his 1981 first 
place finish with 639 points 




Edward Baus - North Park — 

"It was fun, I really enjoyed it. I 
completed the course in six 
minutes, 53 seconds. They 
gave m'e seven minutes." Baus 
finished 20th in the Circle with 
482 points. 




Martin Troglia - Limits 

CTA's 1981 APTA Interna- 
tional Bus Roadeo represen- 
tative "I wish more drivers 
would get into the Roadeo 1 
love it. It's been very good to 
me. It has helped me a lot in the 
street as far as keeping accidents 
down As for driving standards, 
you learn a lot in the course 
because it puts you in a position 
where you have a tighter course 
to go through than a city street 
Troglia finished second with 
575 points 



Quenton Clark -Washington 

— "The Roadeo is a chance for 
the employee to try for 
something It's a challenge to 
see if you are the best, or one of 
the best. The tennis balls were 
really tough I think they are still 
bouncing " Clark finished 19th 
in the Winning Circle with 482 
points, edging out the 20th slot 
on the written test 



Jesse Moore - Beverly A 

participant who did not place in 
the 1981 finals. Moore returns 
to rank third with 571 points in 
this year's Winning Circle 20. 
"You have to know your equip- 
ment: length of the bus, width, 
how many feet from the rear 
wheels to the rear of the bus and 
from the front wheels to the 
front of the bus." said Moore. 
"It's nice--the setup, the way 
they judge it 




Willie Whisenton - Limits 

"The Roadeo competition has 
given me a better outlook on the 
CTA because it is something set 
aside especially for bus 
operators Since the first 
Roadeo. I have felt better about 
my job My wife also has a bet- 
ter outlook about my job " 
Whisenton finished 18th in this 
year's contest with 485 points 
He was fifth in the 1981 Win- 
ning Circle, and distinguished 
himself as CTA's third runner- 
up in last year's final competi- 
tion. 



Craig Richter - Forest Glen 

— "I'm enjoying the competi- 
tion very much, although the 
Y-back was tough I believe the 
Bus Roadeo can do a lot for 
morale " Richter finished 14th 
with 496 points 



Eddie Johnson - 77th Street 

— "It seems like there was more 
enthusiasm among the con- 
testants in the Roadeo this year 
than we saw last year Personal 
ly. I felt good about it It made 
me feel that I had accomplished 
something" Johnson said he 
had a lot more confidence this 
year than last year although he 
finished in seventh place this 
year compared to second place 
in the 1981 competition 'Til 
just project my 10 per cent and 
leave the other 90 per cent to 
the Good Lord." said Johnson 





Wendell J. Talbert - North 

Park — "The competition was 
great It would really be great to 
take something back to North 
Park I think some kind of 
trophy would really be great for 
morale," commented Talbert. 
who finished in 10th place with 
530 points 



William Ramos - North Park 

— "It's a matter of pride in 
yourself -competing with the 
best, and doing your best It 
gives you pleasure to be a win- 
ner, or even want to be a win- 
ner Once you get there. It really 
gives you a personal satisfaction 
for doing a good job " Ramos 
finished 16th with 487 points 



Edward Urbanski - Archer — 

"The Roadeo gave me the op- 
portunity to meet people that I 
wouldn't have met otherwise It 
was a great family event I went 
to 77lh Street to qualify, and all 
the families were there My 
family has been looking. forward 
to this since last year, and they 
are looking forward to the 
finals " Urbanski finished eighth 
with 532 points, slightly ahead 
of his ninth place ptjsition in 
1981 He edged his closest op- 
ponent for the eighth slot on the 
written test 




Journey 
to Kenya 

At the turn of the century, Nairobi, 
the capital of Kenya, consisted of little 
more than a few huts which housed 
construction engineers and workers of 
the Uganda Railway. Today, it is the 
most important economic and 
transportation center of East Africa. 

Ric Carter, a CTA Travel Informa- 
tion Representative who recently 
returned from the Kenyan capital, said 
the developing Nairobi is already as 
modern as Chicago. Skyscrapers and 
wide streets designed to accommodate 
heavy traffic are characteristic. Urban 
dwellers travel primarily by bus, while 
Kenyans on the outskirts of Nairobi are 
also served by rail. As shown in 
Carter's photos, the "Dark Continent" 
provides a striking contrast between 
wilderness areas inhabited by wild 
animals and developing cities where 
transit plays a major role in modern 
living. 

Nairobi is the hub of East Africa's 
entertainment, offering a wide variety 
from theater and concerts to sports. It 
is 1,675 feet above sea level and 100 
miles south of the equator, and has a 
particularly agreeable climate. The 



Swahili translation of Nairobi rs "place 
near the cool water." Carter said. 

The 28,500-acre Nairobi National 
Park, located only five miles outside 
the city's center, is one of Nairobi's 
more popular, although smallest, na- 
tional parks. Here visitors may observe 
many animals in their natural habitat, 
despite the proximity of the city. 

Carter said numerous excursions to 
various wildlife preserves in East and 
Central Africa begin in Nairobi. A most 



popular place is Amboseli Game 
Reserve located at the foot of Mount 
Kilimanjaro. Amboseli, which is 
owned and maintained by the Masai 
Warriors, is famous for its lions and 
leopards. 

Tsavo National Park is another at- 
traction which offers the visitor varied 
scenery. Tsavo is divided into an 
eastern and western half from Nairobi 
to Mombasa. Just as Nairobi is the hub 
of entertainment, so is Mombasa the 




10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




headquarters for beach lovers. Carter 
said that Mombasa is considered the 
most important port on Africa's east 
coast and a primary vacation spot for 
Europeans. 

Carter said that travel to Africa has 
exposed him to cultures he would 
otherwise have not known. "1 have 
learned to respect other cultures no 
matter how different they are from that 
to which I am accustomed, yet I'm 
always happy to return to Chicago." 



More June 
Graduates 





Congratulations 



Transit News would like to join the Meza 
family in extending congratulations to 
Luis Meza, Bus Servicer, North Park 
garage. Luis Meza's 11-year-old daughter 
Sylvana recently wrote a letter to Transit 
News informing us that her father has 
earned a bachelor's degree in Psychology- 
Sociology from Elmhurst College. 




Kathereen Ellis 

Wendel Phillip H.S. 

LaRouen Ellis 

Kimball 



Darryl Robinson 

MacMurray College 

Vernan Robinson 

Howard 



Eagle soars 

Craig Gonder, 15, son of Emmet 
Condor, Senior Budget Analyst, 
Budget department, has been 
awarded the Boy Scouts of America's 
coveted Eagle Scout rank, the highest 
rank a Boy Scout can achieve. 

His service project leading to the 
Eagle Scout rank was the planning, 
recruiting of volunteers, construction, 
and installation of a suspension foot- 
bridge across the Kishwaukee River in 
Butternut Woods near his hometown 
of Crystal Lake. 

Craig, who plans to be an architect, 
prepared his project drawings with the 
guidance of assistant scoutmaster. Bill 
Keith, construction manager for an 
engineering firm. 

Craig is the bugler of Boy Scout 
Troop 158 in Crystal Lake. His father, 
Emmet, is the troop's scoutmaster. 




Number 1 

Congratulations to Evelyn Borrero, 
daughter of Law Department Clerk Pedro 
Borrero. Evelyn ranked number 1 in a 
class of 694 freshmen at Benito Juarez 
High School and had a perfect attendance 
record during the spring semester. 




A Ton! for a Tony: look alikes Tony Poulos, 
Jefferson Park Motorman, and his 
16-month old Granddaughter Toni 
Zurales, a St. Patrick's Day baby, proudly 
wear their regulation CTA motorman 
uniforms. 



JULY, 1982 



For i^our benefit 

Post-retirement financial protection for your spouse 



Retirement protection for your 
spouse is available through two basic 
post-retirement options: A and B. 
Each option offers three different elec- 
tions: All, Two-Thirds, or One- 
Half. The three choices represent the 
amount your spouse could receive 
upon your death. 

Under the All election, your spouse 
would receive the same amount to 
which you are entitled, while under 
the Two-Thirds choice your spouse 
would receive two-thirds the amount 
of your entitlement. Under the One- 
Half election your spouse would 
receive one-half the- amount to which 
you are entitled. 

Likewise, there is a different ac- 
tuarial reduction factor associated with 



each choice - - a factor which is based 
on you and your spouse's age at retire- 
ment. Thus, there are six possible 
choices and six reduction factors 
related to Options A and B. 

Any election under Option A (All. 
Two-Thirds, or One-Half) represents a 
permanent reduction in an employee's 
retirement allowance regardless of 
who dies first, you or your spouse. On 
the other hand, any election under 
Option B reverts back to the full 
unreduced retirement allowance if 
your spouse dies first. 

An employee may also choose the 
Normal Form of retirement payment 
which will provide unreduced pension 
payments each month for the lifetime 
of the retiree. In this case, however, 



upon the retiree's death, the spouse 
would not be entitled to a pension. 
Any employee who is legally married 
at the time of retirement and has not 
selected an Option Plan will 
automatically be given the A-y2 Op- 
tion. 

Here is an example of the six 
choices of Post-Retirement Options. 
CTA employee, Terry Thomas, sub- 
mitted a Retirement Application for a 
June 1, 1982 date of retirement. Terry 
has completed 30 years of service and 
recently celebrated his 63rd birthday. 
Theresa, Terry's wife, is 61. Since 
Terry did not choose otherwise, he 
was given the Automatic A-V2 Op- 
tion at retirement. 

Assuming Terry is entitled to an an- 



Post-retirement options 




Unreduced 




Annual 


Option A 


Pension 


Elections 


(Normal Form) 


ALL 


$12,000 


2/3 


$12,000 


1/2 


$12,000 







Reduced 




Terry's 


Theresa's 




Reduction 


Annual 




Monthly 


Monthly 




Factors 


Pension 




Pension 


Pension* 


X 


.7494 


$ 8,992.80 


^ 12 


$749.40 


$749.40 


X 


.8177 


$ 9,812.40 


^ 12 


$817.70 


$545.16 


X 


.8567 


$10,280.40 


^ 12 


$856.70 


$428.35 



•Payable in the event of Terry's deatti. 

Note: Under Option A elections, if Theresa dies first, Terry's pension remains at level indicated in 
'Terry's Monthly Pension' column. 



Option B 

Elections 

ALL 

2/3 

1/2 



Unreduced 

Annual 

Pension 

(Normal Form) 

$12,000 
$12,000 
$12,000 





Reduced 




Terry's 


Theresa's 


Reduction 


Annual 




Monthly 


Monthly 


Factors 


Pension 




Pension 


Pension* 


.7211 


$ 8,653.20 


^ 12 


$721.10 


$721.10 


.7950 


$ 9,540.00 


- 12 


$795.00 


$530.03 


.8380 


$10,056.00 


+ 12 


$838.00 


$419.00 



•Payable in the event of Terry's death. 

Note: Under Option B elections, if spouse dies first, Terry's pension reverts back to $1,000 per month, 
as if no Option has been elected. 

Normal Form 

If Terry decided to take the Normal Form of payment, the calculations would be as follows: 



Terry's Unreduced 
Annual Pension 



ti^nnn 19 - -ki nnn/mn Terry's unreduced monthly 

$12,000 ^ 12 - $1,000/mo. - payments for life 

(No reduction factor involved) 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



nual pension of $12,000, the Post- 
Option calculations are shown in the 
chart. 

Under the A-V2 Option, Terry's 
monthly retirement allowance (pen- 
sion) would be $856.70. If he died 
before Theresa, she would then col- 
lect $428.35 for life. However, if 
Theresa dies first, Terry would con- 
tinue collecting $856.70 per month for 
life. 

Thus, the reduction is permanent. 

If Terry had elected Option 
A-^s, he would receive $817.70 per 
month. In the event of his death, 
Theresa would collect two-thirds of the 
$817.70, or $545.16. 

If Terry had elected Option 
A-All, he would receive $749.40 per 
month. Theresa would collect the 
same amount ($749,40) , if Terry died 
first. 

If Terry chose the B-V2 Option 
and Theresa dies first, Terry's monthly 
pension would ordinarily be $838.00 
(see chart in Example). However, 
since we are assuming Theresa dies 
first, Terry would then revert back to 
$1,000 per month, the same as if no 
Option (or the Normal Form) had 
been elected. The same would apply if 
Terry had elected Option B-All or 
B-2/3. 

If Terry had selected the Nor- 
mal Form of payment, Theresa 
would not be entitled to a pension 



when Terry dies. However, assuming 
Theresa is Terry's primary beneficiary, 
she would receive: 

1. A Death Benefit--the amount 
varies from $1,000 to $4,000, 
depending on an employee's 
age and years of service. 

2. The difference between Terry's 
contributions to the Retirement 
Plan and the sum total retire- 
ment allowance paid him prior 
to his death, if the total 
allowance paid is less than 
Terry's contribution. (Generally 
speaking, Terry would have col- 
lected an amount equal to that 
which he contributed to the 
Retirement Plan within three 
years after retirement.) 

If election is made within the six 
months prior to the effective date of 
retirement, evidence of good health 
will be required by the Retirement 
Allowance Commmittee, except in 
cases of Automatic Option A-V2. 

Finally, proof of age for you and 
your spouse, as well as proof of mar- 
riage documents, should be submitted 
to the Pension Section before the elec- 
tion papers are completed. 

For more information, contact the 
Pension Section at 929-5750. 

(Next month's For your benefit col- 
umn will explain the Combined Op- 
tions -- Pre and Post-Retirement ) 




Retired Bus Operators Arthur 
L. Mulr (left), and Mel Horning, 
both formerly of North Park 
garage, don cowboy hats and 
reminisce about their days at 
CTA. Mulr who now makes his 
home In Forsyth, Mo., was host 
for his visiting former co- 
worker from Chicago. 



Law for today 

Q. I was ticketed for not having a 
red flag on the end of some 
lumber I was transporting in 
my truck. At what length is a 
red flag necessary? 

A. Whenever the load upon any vehi- 
cle extends to the rear four feet or 
more beyond the bed or body of 
the vehicle, there shall be 
displayed at the extreme rear end 
of the load a red light or lantern 
plainly visible from a distance of at 
least 500 feet to the sides and rear. 
For any load extending less than 
four feet, there shall be displayed 
at the extreme rear end of the load 
a red flag or cloth not less than 12 
inches square. 

- ■ Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I am a widow with two 
children. If I should die, could 
my 17 year old daughter be 
named guardian for her 13 
year old brother? 

A, No. To be a guardian, a person 
must be 18 years old, of sound 
mind, not adjudged disabled and 
have not been convicted of a 
crime. 

' - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. May I disinherit my wife 
without her knowledge? 

A. No. A person may dispose of their 
property in any way he or she 
wishes in a will. However, Illinois 
law does not allow one spouse to 
disinherit the other without the 
consent of the one who is 
disinherited. A surviving spouse, 
whether or not named in the will, 
may always claim at least part of 
the deceased spouse's estate. 

■ Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. What exactly is joint tenancy? 

A. Broadly defined, joint tenancy 
creates joint ownership in real or 
personal property between two or 
more people so that upon the 
death of one joint tenant, the dece- 
dent's interest in the property ter- 
minates and passes to the surviving 
joint tenant or joint tenants. Joint 
tenancy is not a substitute for a 
will. 

Illinois State Bar Association 



Submit questions to 

Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield. IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in column 
Personal answers not possible ) 



JULY, 1982 



Engineers 

earn award 

for Douglas bridge 

Envirodyne Engineers, designers of 
the replacement structure for the 
CTA's Rockwell Street Bridge, was 
named a top national winner in the 
1982 American Consulting Engineers 
Council. The firm planned and de- 
signed the 250-foot bridge for CTA 
under unusual construction and time 
constraints. The firm scheduled a con- 
struction time table to replace the very 
old. but much used bridge without 
seriously inconveniencing CTA riders. 

The construction sequence required 
elevation of the transit rail lines on the 
old bridge by a series of 17 coor- 
dinating jacking towers. While the 
tracks were being raised, a new 
replacement bridge was built less than 
10 feet away from the existing bridge. 

Following a Friday evening rush 
hour, operations on a portion of the 
Douglas line were halted while con- 
tractors cut out the existing bridge and. 
using two mounted cranes, pulled the 



ING/10INEERS 




American Consulting Engineers Council President William R. Ratliff (left) presents a 1982 
ACEC Engineering Excellence Award to (from left): Chris Kalogeras, CTA Director of Plant 
Engineering; Harry Wenke. Project Manager, Envirodyne Engineers, Inc.; and l^arsfiall 
Suloway, Envirodyne Senior Vice President. 



bridge out of the transit line. Using the 
same two cranes, the contractor then 
pulled the new replacement bridge in- 
to the vacant space. The bridge was 
connected into the system and transit 
operations were reinstated 



The engineers saved almost $1 
million using this construction se- 
quence instead of conventional 
methods, thus avoiding additional 
right-of-way acquisition and building 
demolition 



Mr. & Mrs. John Veltrl of Berkeley, Illinois 
will celebrate their 60th wedding anniver- 
sary on August 8, 1982. John, a retired 
West Section Conductor and father of 
Michael Veltri, Rail Superintendent, and 
his wife Jeanette, have 3 sons, 13 grand- 
children and 6 great grandchildren. 



YOUR NAME 




SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



CTA TRANSrr NEWS 



Volume 35 



Number 7 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mall to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS. P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
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AS rOU KNOW VOUR NEW ADDRESS 



ivlng. or AS SOON 



Published tor employees and retirees of CTA by ttie 
Public Alfalrs/Consumer Services Group, MIctiael 
N Horowitz. Group Manager 

Editorial and graptitc by tr^e Public Affairs Depart- 
ment. Bill Baxa. Manager 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Production Assistant: Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal. 

Jeff stern. Don Yabush 

Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed tree of charge to alt active and retired 
CTA employees Annual subscription price to 
others. $5 CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Pia^a. P.O. Box 3555. Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



ROBERT BOSCHERT, Foreman, 

West Shops. Emp. 7-2-45 
PETAR DJURDJEVIC, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 1-22-69 
GAETANO FAGIOLO, Car Repairman A. 

Harlem, Emp. 8-18-52 
EDWARD HEAD Jr., Operator. 

77th Street, Emp 4-29-52 
ALEX JANITO, Box Puller, 

Limits. Emp, 8-30-55 



GEORGE NICHOLSON. Car Repairman A. 

98th Street. Emp. 6-6-51 
EDWARD O'BRIEN, Operator, 

North Park, Emp, 10-19-50 
JOSEPH OLANDESE, Bus Repairer. 

Archer, Emp 10-8-47 
WALTER POSTADA, Motorman, 

Douglas, Emp. 2-23-49 
LINDSEY ROBINSON. Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 5-23-57 
ALLEN SMITH Jr . Operator, 

77th Street, Emp 1-3-52 
MEZELL WILLIAMS, Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp 1-26-56 
ROBERT WINTHER. Imprvmts, Engr., 

Rail Maintenance. Emp 10-5-43 



THEODORE ZUREK. Operator, 
Lawndale, Emp, 7-3-46 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 

CLEVELAND COBURN. Traffic Checker, 

Schedules. Emp. 12-12-66 
CORNELL GRANT Sr . Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 2-14-66 
PATRICK STAUDT. Signal Foreman. 

West Shops. Emp 8-30-48 
FANNIE WILLIAMS. Ticket Agent. 

South Section. Emp 5-21-69 
ROBERT WILLIAMS. Operator, 

69th Street, Emp, 7-11-68 



i3>T 3S/fl:E!JS>a:oi^iA.3S/a: 

OLIVE BATTERSBY, 81, Accounting, 

Emp, 5-21-18, Died 5-27-82 
THOMAS CANNING, 62, Beverly, 

Emp. 4-28-42. Died 4-28-82 
IRENE CAVANAGH, 93. North Section. 

Emp. 9-11-29. Died - - 
WILLIAM CLOW, 79, North Park, 

Emp. 1-9-36. Died 5-26-82 
HAROLD COFFEY. 68, 77th Street. 

Emp. 2-4-36. Died 5-28-82 
PATRICK CUNNEEN. 85, 77th Street, 

Emp, 11-5-26, Died 5-11-82 
HAROLD CUNNINGHAM, 85, Treasury. 

Emp. 5-23-24, Died 5 18-82 
WILBUR FREDERICKSEN, 70, North Ave , 

Emp, 10-22-41, Died 5-30-82 
JOHN GALLAGHER, 77, 52nd Street, 

Emp. 9-9-29, Died 5-9-82 
ELI GRADY, 89, Shops & Equipment, 

Emp, 9-13-43, Died 5-14-82 



DANIEL GRANUCCI, 73, Stores, 

Emp 12-5-41. Died 5-8-82 
CONRAD JOHNSON. 66. Limits. 

Emp 11-8-45. Died 5-12-82 
ROBERT JONES. 74. District B. 

Emp 9-12-42. Died 5-21-82 
LOUIS JORDAN. 82. Forest Glen. 

Emp 1-4-29. Died 5-28-82 
SIGUARD JOSEPHSEN. 84. Sched. Traffic, 

Emp 5-11-21, Died 4-26-82 
JAMES KEENON, 64, Archer, 

Emp, 8-31 43, Died 5-14-82 
CASIMIER LASKOWSKI, 75, Skokie Shop, 

Emp 5-13-36, Died 5-6-82 
WALTER LEVERENZ, 93, West Section. 

Emp 9-15-06. Died 5-24-82 
HARRY LOUIS. 69. Beverly. 

Emp 9-21-36. Died 5-25-82 
WILLIAM MADSEN. 80. North Park. 

Emp 1-15-27. Died 5-29-82 
DANIEL McLaughlin. 81. West Section. 

Emp 3 13-26. Died 5-5-82 



DORCY MUMBOWER. 63. North Avenue. 

Emp. 3-15-56. Died 5-13-82 
ERMA O'BRYAN. 88. West Section. 

Emp 10-4-35. Died 5-16-82 
GEORGE OSTERMEYER. 67. Howard. 

Emp, 6-1-36, Died 5-11-82 
ELLA REXFORD, 83, South Section, 

Emp 10 24-47, Died 5-16-82 
BRUNO ROSKUSZKA, 66, West Shops, 

Emp, 11-23-42, Died 5-25-82 
JOHN RYAN, 84, Const & Maint , 

Emp 5-26-25, Died 5-19-82 
MICHAEL SEREDA, 69, Forest Glen, 

Emp 3-20-43, Died 5-15-82 
WILLIAM SHEFFNER, 91, South Section. 

Emp 2-28-11, Died 5-28-82 
EUGENE SULLIVAN, 67, Mgmt Services. 

Emp 3-1-66, Died 5-10-82 
PATRICK WATERS, 90, 77th Street, 

Emp 6-3-13, Died 5-10-82 
JOHN ZERAVICH, 82, Const & Maim , 

Emp 8-16-24, Died 5-9-82 



Service 
anniversaries 
in July 



40 years 



Donald Lemm 

Insurance & Pensions 




35 years 



Arthur Ardwinl. Electrical 
Gordon Balazs, Bus Service 
Frank Bruno, Maint Trng Cntr 
Anthony French, North Avenue 
Edward Jenski, Utility 
James Johnson, 77th Street 
Aloysius Kolman. Maintenance 
Michael Lacrlola, North Avenue 
Frederick Miraglio, Jefferson Park 
Roger Mulvihill, South Shops 
John Murray, Maintenance 
Leonard Skrine, Management Services 
Ronald Utiey, Forest Glen 



30 years 



William Buerger, Skokie Shop 
Donald Gierhahn, Electrical 
Atlas Horn, South Shops 
Peter Kouchoukos, Electrical 
Charles Nelson. 98th Shop 
Victor Szymkewicz, Consumer Services 
Earl Thompson, North Avenue 
eleven Wardlow, Limits 



25 years 



Carl Benoit, Forest Glen 
Willie Burge Jr., 69th Street 
Michael Chambers, Maintenance 
Michael Deely, North Avenue 
Carl Fields. District C 
Jessie Gilmore. 77th Street 
Andrew Hendrix Jr., Archer 
Jerome Holmes, North Park 
Tyree Lee, Beverly 
Sam McCullar. Utility 
Charles Myers, Schedules 
Clarin Patterson. Maintenance 
James Richardson. South Section 



JULY. 1982 



Former Surface Lines employees 

Illinois Railway Museum needs your help! 



The Illinois Railway Museum needs 
your help! There are twelve electric 
cars from the Surface Lines in their 
collection at Union. Two of the cars, 
Red Pullman #144 and Green Hornet 
#4391, have been restored to 
operating condition. Another car, 
#1374, is in the process of being 
restored. 

To make sure future restorations are 
accurate, they need technical informa- 
tion. The problem is that, although 
Chicago had one of the largest street- 
car systems in the world, very little re- 
mains today in the way of technical 
data, drawings, manuals, or parts. 
Most of these items disappeared after 
the cars were replaced by buses. 

Several of the Museum's cars are in- 
complete and will need extensive 
rebuilding. In order to do it correctly 
and save many hours of research, they 
are asking former Surface Lines 
employees to help out by providing 
any printed information they may 
have. They would be very grateful and 




would properly house the material in 
their technical library at the Museum 
site. If you can be of any help, please 
contact them at: 



Illinois Railway Museum 
P.O. Box 431 
Union, Illinois 60180 
Attention: Car Dept. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 
Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 



'KCC^CC^ 



Odom wins 
Bus Roadeo 



John Odom, a 21-year CTA 
veteran from the 69th Street garage, 
was the winner of the 1982 Bus 
Roadeo held July 25 at the Soldier 
Field South Parking Lot. Odom, a line 
instructor, scored 712 out of a possible 
750 points to take the coveted first 
prize . 

Odom and his wife, Mary, are the 
recipients of an all-expense paid trip to 
the American Public Transit Associa- 
tion (APTA) convention in Boston in 
October. There Odom will compete 
with other Bus Roadeo winners from 
the United States and Canada in the 
APTA International Bus Roadeo. The 
winner of the international competi- 
tion will receive $1,000 and a com- 
memorative plaque. 

Michael Matas of Forest Glen 
garage, also a line instructor, scored 
703 points to take second-place 
honors. Matas received a $500 sav- 
ings bond, and will represent CTA in 
the APTA Bus Roadeo if Odom is 
unable to participate in the annual 
event. 

A $200 savings bond was awarded 
to Robert L. Richardson of North Park 
garage who placed third with 684 
points. Richardson was the second- 
place winner in the 1981 Bus Roadeo. 
Garnering fourth place was Jesse 
Moore Jr., of Beverly garage, with 
674 points. Moore received a $100 
savings bond. Both Richardson and 
Moore are also line instructors. 

A banquet held August 20 in the 
Merchandise Mart M&M Club 
honored all of the members of the 
1982 Winning Circle 20. Trophies and 
appropriate savings bond awards were 
presented at the banquet to Odom 
and the three runners-up. 

Each member of the Winning Cir- 
cle, including the top four winners, 
received a pair of Drury Lane dinner- 
theater tickets as well as a distinctive 
commemorative brass belt buckle and 
a Roadeo patch which may be worn 
on CTA uniforms. Special plaques for 
first-place individual garage winners 
were presented immediately following 
the preliminary competition. 





Ban 

the buck! 

Page 3 



Edward Mitchell (left), Director, Training and Utility, officially announces John Odom of 
69th Street garage as winner of the 1982 Bus Roadeo. Odom (right), obviously surprised, 
receives the announcement enthusiastically. On hand for the occasion were James Blaa, 
Manager of Transportation, and Michael N. Horowitz, Group Manager, Public Affairs/Con- 
sumer Services. 





Accepting third place honors in the 
Roadeo Is Robert L. Richardson, North 
Park garage. 



9s, Forest Gien garage, was 
I winner in the Bus Roadeo. 



Operators who competed in the 
preliminary driving competition also 
received a special recognition cer- 
tificate and a CTA Bus Roadeo cap. 

Edward Mitchell, Director of 
Training-Utility, said, "The awards for 
participation are proof positive that 
there are never any losers in the CTA 
Bus Roadeo." 

Elonzo Hill and Paul Kadowaki, co- 
chairmen of the Bus Roadeo commit- 
tee, said next year they hope to dou- 
ble the 303 Roadeo entrants of 1982. 
"This is a very positive activity and we 
invite all our operators to take the 
challenge," said Hill and Kadowaki. 

Transportation Manager James 
Blaa said, "I'm very proud of all who 
participated. The Roadeo committee 
and our volunteers have done an 
outstanding job. Our goal, of course, 
is to be number one in the APTA com- 
petition in October." 




Fourth place honors in the 1982 Bus 
Roadeo were awarded to Jesse Moore, Jr., 
Beverty garage. 



4:ita 



TRANS T new; 



FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

AUGUST, 1982 



From the Chairman 

Bus Roadeo 
Ban the Buck 



On behalf of all CTA employees, 1 congratulate John 
Odom for his excellent performance in winning the 1982 
CTA Bus Roadeo Final Competition, and I am certain that 
Mr. Odom will represent CTA well in the APTA Interna- 
tional Bus Roadeo. 

Congratulations also to all members of the "Winning Cir- 
cle 20," all contestants, and all volunteer workers. Your 
enthusiastic participation is establishing the Bus Roadeo as a 
CTA summertime tradition. 




Bus Roadeo winner John Odom (center) Is congratulated by (from 
left): Harold H. Gelssenhelmer, General Operations Manager; 
Paul KadowakI, Superintendent, Bus Instruction; CTA Chairman 
Michael Cardllll, and Lonnle Hill, Superintendent, Limits Training 
Center. KadowakI and Hill are co-chairman of the CTA Bus 
Roadeo. 

Dollar bills in the fare box are again reaching crisis levels, 
and the counting of dollar bills by banks and repairs to fare 
collection equipment are unnecessary operating expenses 
that reduce efficiency. I have directed our Public Affairs 
Department to begin "Ban the Buck" advertising on local 
radio stations, and 1 direct all bus operators to continue 
politely reminding riders to use exact change. As shown in 
the chart on Page 3, the combined efforts of advertising, 
news releases, and, most importantly, your first-hand com- 
munication with riders, have helped reduce the amount of 
dollar bills collected in the past. 

But experience has also shown us that riders gradually 
forget that we have this serious problem. With our limited 
advertising budget, we can get the message to our riders on- 
ly when a crisis is imminent. Your polite and frequent 
reminders will guarantee their continual cooperation, keep 
the influx of dollar bills at a reasonable level, and help 
reduce operating costs. 



^;^^io^5><i-^ 




Robert Richardson 



John Odom 



Roadeo winners 
preach the gospel 

Moonlighting is nothing new, but one of the most notable 
of services for those who do is the gospel ministry. 

Two bus operators with missions to preach the word of 
God recently distinguished themselves as winners in the 
CTA's second annual Bus Roadeo. They are John Odom, 
42, of 69th Street garage, first-place winner, and Robert L. 
Richardson, 35, of North Park garage who took third-place 
honors. 

Both men moved to Chicago from their native Alabama 
and attended special schools in preparation for their noble 
calling. Odom attended the Moody Bible Institute, and 
Richardson was a student at Chicago Bible Institute where 
he hopes to earn a degree in the future. He also attended 
Gramlin College in Louisiana for two and a half years where 
he majored in physical education. 

The Rev. Mr. Odom is assistant pastor of Harris Temple 
A. OH., 741 East Bowen Avenue, Chicago. His respon- 
sibilities at Harris Temple keep him busy in all aspects of 
Christian service, from preaching the word to counseling, 
and conducting marriage ceremonies and funerals. 

The 21-year CTA veteran said, "Driving a bus has really 
helped me in the ministry, and certainly the ministry has 
helped me in this job." He entered the ministry in 1972 and 
was ordained in 1974 after attending Moody Bible Institute. 

Rev. Richardson is associate pastor of Mount Pleasant 
Baptist Church at 66th and Blackstone, Chicago. A former 
Sunday School teacher and member of the Mount Pleasant 
choir, he accepted his call to the ministry in 1978. Richard- 
son presented his introductory sermon in 1979, and has 
been continuously active as a visiting minister at various 
churches. 

Like the apostles of biblical days. Reverends Odom and 
Richardson have a mission to preach the word of God, but 
they also have to feed and clothe themselves and their 
families. Odom is the father of five children, and Richardson 
is the father of three. 

The apostles of old were employed in some manner, and 
these two modern-day apostles are employed as bus 
operators. St. Paul, the most notable of missionaries in the 
Mediterranean during the biblical era, was himself a tent- 
maker, and was comfortable in his secular and non-secular 
roles. 

Reverends Odom and Richardson, like the apostles of 
that day, are happy in their service for God and feel very 
much at home in their service to CTA, a fact they 
demonstrated by taking top honors in the second annual 
Bus Roadeo. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Ban the Buck! 

Ifs happening again 

Sitting in a huge pile of dollar bills 
may look ideal in an Illinois State Lot- 
tery TV commercial, but at CTA it's a 
waste of money that could better be 
used to pay salaries and bills. It costs 
money to have banks count the 
bills— $25 per 1,000 bills, and it costs 
money to have fare collection equip- 
ment sent out for repairs. In-house, 
man hours spent repairing fare collec- 
tion equipment could be put to better 
use performing preventative 
maintenance on vehicles. 

The chart at the right shows the ef- 
fect of the first two "Ban the Buck" 
campaigns on October 4, 1981, and 
January 12, 1982. But it also shows 
that, without constant reminders, our 
riders will gradually forget that we 
need help with this serious problem. 

It's time to fight back, by politely 
asking our riders for help. CTA will 
soon begin airing the radio commercial 
that was very effective in Phase II, with 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services 
Group Manager Michael Horowitz ex- 
plaining the situation to riders and ask- 
ing them to please use exact change. 
But advertising on a limited budget 
cannot constantly remind riders that 
CTA needs their help. 

The key to keeping the influx of 
dollar bills at a low level is the public 
relations skill used by each bus 
operator on a daily basis. So, once 
again, all bus operators are being 
asked to remind riders that CTA works 
hard to provide good service, and that 
one of the biggest hindrances to im- 
proving service is unnecessary ex- 
pense — like the cost of having dollar 
bills counted and repairing fare collec- 
tion equipment. 

CTA retires last of its revenue bonds 



%^^« Number of Dollar Bill 
^^"^ *or Surface System Fa 


5 Received 
re Payment 




Week of 
September 28, 198 


Average 
Day 

200,473 


High 
Day 

241,988 


Low 
Day 

121,760 


"Ban the Buck' 


Campaign-Phase 1 


Began October 


4, 1981 


Month of 
October, 1981 


65,950 


111,093 


52,560 


Month of 
November, 1981 


84,240 


139,245 


69,300 


Month of 
December, 1981 


107,835 


135,829 


51,998 


First Half, 
January, 1982 


114,468 


160,942 


90,058 


"Ban the Buck" 


Campaign-Phase II 


Began January 


12, 1982 


Second Half, 
January, 1982 


72,058 


101,866 


55,681 


Month of 
February, 1982 


84,986 


128,856 


61,453 


Month of 
March, 1982 


104,748 


170,564 


82,038 


Month of 
April, 1982 


121,480 


180,619 


82,545 


Month of 
May, 1982 


139,802 


205,395 


115,921 


Month of 
June, 1982 


148,009 


197,694 


68,707 


July 1-10, 1982 


152,079 


205,584 


90,468 


Most Dollar Bills 


ever collected in a 


single day: 






September 11, 


1981 


284,666 



CTA retired $17.4 million in 
revenue bonds on July 1, as sched- 
uled. They were the last of a total of 
$135 million in revenue bonds issued 
by CTA in 1947, 1952, and 1953. 

These bonds, with a coupon rate of 
4y2 per cent interest, were issued by 
CTA in 1952 and 1953, and the pro- 
ceeds were used for the acquisition of 
the Chicago Motor Coach company 
and the Evanston branch of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and 
Pacific Railroad company. 

The total bond proceeds were used 
for the acquisition of the Chicago Sur- 
face Lines, Chicago Rapid Transit 



company (and Evanston branch), the 
Chicago Motor Coach company and 
to provide initial working capital. 

The payment of the 1952-1953 
Series bonds was accomplished with 
public funds secured from the 
Regional Transportation Authority 
and with the use of the balance of 
funds in the CTA Debt Service 
Reserve Fund. 

Michael A. Cardilli, CTA Chairman, 
said, "This is a significant milestone in 
the life of the CTA. 

"Retirement of the bonds signifies 
the strong commitment that the CTA 
Board and Chicago area governmen- 



tal leaders have to fulfilling obligations 
to those who have had faith in the 
development and continuance of 
public transit in the Chicago area," 
Cardilli said. 

Paul Kole, Group Manager, 
Finance, noted that most of the debt 
service cost during the life of the 
revenue bonds was funded through 
fare box receipts. 

"From 1947 through 1970, over 
$80 million of the $135 million bonds 
were retired and interest paid semi- 
annually during this 23-year period," 
Kole said. 

The CTA first received public funds 
for operating debt service costs in 
1971. 



AUGUST, 1982 



Culture Bus opens new world 
for mobility-limited riders 



A new world has opened for 
Chicago's mobility-limited, thanks to 
the CTA Special Services Culture Bus. 
A Special Services Bus from the 
Washington garage tours some of 
Chicago's familiar culture centers, thus 
providing a new outlet for the mobility- 
limited. 

Special Services Superintendent 
Isaac Beal said patrons are excited 
about the new service and the many 
possibilities for new places which may 
be added to the tours. Plans presently 
call for operating Special Services 
Culture Bus tours twice each month. 

The new Culture Bus trips provide 
mobility-limited riders an opportunity 
to visit several accessible cultural at- 
tractions which are also seen by 
regular CTA Culture Bus riders every 
Sunday and holidays from May 31 
through October 24. 

The service provides transportation 
for mobility-limited riders, using lift- 
equipped vehicles. Riders who have 
applied for CTA Special Services and 
have been certified eligible for the pro- 
gram are permitted to ride the Special 
Services Culture Bus. 

"We have been concerned about 
getting better weekend utilization of 
our facilities," said Beal. He said it was 
decided to structure a culture bus pro- 
gram for the mobility-limited serving 
the same routes used by regular 
Culture Bus patrons. 

Beal and members of the Culture 
Bus staff are careful to check out 
culture centers along each route to be 
certain of their accessibility to 
subscribers. Among the many centers 
visited are the Museum of Science and 
Industry, the Chicago Art Institute, 
DuSable Museum, and the Field 
Museum. 

Jack Pearson, a rail buff and 
volunteer moderator on the Special 
Services Culture Bus, said the new 
service operates at a low key pace. 
"I'm very sensitive to the needs of the 
patron," said Pearson. "This is their 
show, so I go all out to help by not 
pushing the people into a time frame. 
We spend as much time in each loca- 
tion as people feel they need. Perhaps 
my own experience with limited vision 
makes me sensitive to the needs of 




This retrofitted bus makes It possible for mobllltyllmited riders like Latony Young to en- 
joy some of Cfilcago's sights, many for the first time. Latony and her brother, Leslie, got 
their first look at the Garfield Conservatory on this outing. 




Chicago cultural centers are now available to mobility-limited riders as a result of the new 
Special Services Culture Bus. Mrs. Freda Shaw (right), called the service "excellent." 



others," he said. 

Recalling a recent visit to the Gar- 
field Conservatory, Pearson said, "It 
was there to enjoy, so we let the peo- 
ple take their time and soak up the 
beauty." 

"The service is excellent," com- 
mented Mrs. Freda Shaw, a southside 



mother who subscribes to the Special 
Services Culture Bus. She said the ser- 
vice has made it possible for her to en- 
joy some of the city's museums and 
other culture centers for the first time 
in 22 years. "There has never been 
anything like this before," she said. 



Culture Bus 

ridership 

increases 

in 1982 




Improved routing, new attractions, and greater promo- 
tional efforts have resulted in ridership increases of more 
than a third on CTA's Culture Buses this season, compared 
to the same period of 1981, according to the Public Affairs 
and Operations Planning Departments. 

As of Sunday, August 8, 28,947 rides had been taken, 
compared with 21,231 through the 12th day of Culture Bus 
operations a year ago. 

The West route alone showed more than a 50 per cent in- 
crease in ridership. This has been attributed largely to the 
addition of several new stops, including the Holy Trinity 
Russian Orthodox Cathedral, on North Leavitt Street, 
Chinatown, and the Printers Row Museum. 



To meet the demand for West route Culture Bus service, 
five runs were added August 8 to provide 30-minute instead 
of hourly intervals between buses. The additional service will 
be maintained through Labor Day, September 6. 

"With the new stops and the increased recognition this 
service is getting throughout the country and abroad, we ex- 
pect the Culture Bus to remain a major drawing card in 
Chicago for years to come," said Mike Horowitz, Group 
Manager, Public Affairs/Consumer Services. 

"It's a great way for Chicagoans and visitors alike to learn 
about the city so they can take advantage of the many 
cultural attractions Chicago offers," he added. 




Mexican Architects visit CTA 

Nine architects from Mexico City and Guadalajara participating 
In a U.S. - Mexico agreement on an exchange of Ideas and plan- 
ning, Housing and Urban Development, visited the CTA as part of 
their tour of the City of Chicago. During a brief reception for the 
delegates they viewed a film, "Once Upon a Time Table," a CTA 
documentary on the history of public transportation in Chicago. 
The visit was concluded with a short ride to the Loop on the 
Ravenswood 'L.' The delegates and their entourage, and their 
CTA hosts are: Seated (from left), Roberto Eibenschultz Hartman, 
General Director, Population Center, Mexico City; Carlos Gon- 
zalez Esplnosa, Director, Regional Development of Human Set- 
tlements, Mexico City; Alvaro Confreres, Director, Housing In- 
stitute, Guadalajara; Eddie Rock, Interpreter, U.S. State Depart- 
ment; Francisco Prieto, Deputy General Director for Population 
Centers, Mexico City; Alberto Leonel de Cervantes, Chief, Office 



of Planning, Guadalajara, and Ruben Trevino Salinas, Chief, 
Technical Services, Conurbation Commission, Mexico City. Stan- 
ding (from left), Rafael Torres, CTA Schedule Matter; Xavler 
Caraveo, Director of Planning, Federal District; Jaime Fernandez 
Sepulveda, Program Coordinator, Conurbation Commission; 
Robert Ducltworth, Special Assistant to Assistant Secretary, 
HUD, Community Planning and Development; Sal Perce, Assis- 
tant Superintendent, North Avenue garage; Nina Shafran, HUD In- 
ternational Division, Washington; Nelson Bregon, HUD Chicago 
Area Office; Laurina McNeilly, Mayor's Office, Legislative Liaison 
Intergovernmental Affairs; Chandler Thompson, Interpreter, U.S. 
State Department; James Blaa, CTA Manager, Transportation; 
Mike LaVelle, Director, Rail Service; Elda Leal, CTA Public Affairs, 
and Harold H. Geissenhelmer, CTA General Operations Manager. 



AUGUST, 1982 



Francisco Buleje (North 
Avenue garage) was applaud- 
ed by Nordeen Anderson, of 
Pine Grove Avenue, for fiis 
concern for rider comfort on 
his No. 74 Fullerton bus. "It's 
something I seldom see, and i 
tal(e many bus rides. Before 
leaving Halsted and Fuller- 
ton, he got up from his seat 
and checked the windows in 
the bus. One was pushed out, 
and he pushed it back in 
place. He checked the aisles 
and under the seats for trash 
and the like. This was a 
beautiful sight, and I wish 
more drivers would do this. 
This driver was concerned for 
his riders." 




Peyton Hightower (77th 
Street garage) was commend- 
ed by Sister Virginia Magrum, 
who rode his No. 30 South 
Chicago bus to St. Francis de 
Sales High School. "The bus 
was filled with students, but 
instead of rowdiness and 
misbehavior, these students 
were quiet and extremely well 
behaved, actually very 
courteous. He had the whole 
busload smiling and feeling 
good as he greeted each one 
entering, cautioned about the 
steps, and wished them well 
as they left. While acquaint- 
ing his passengers with the 
city and its history, he drove 
very cautiously, warning 
everyone about possible 
bumps or an unexpected 
curve." 



commendation corner 



Frederick Pepke (Limits garage) won the approval of 
Heidi McEwen, who works on North Dearborn Street, for 
his handling of a No. 121 Union/Wacker Express bus. "He 
greeted all passengers with a chipper 'Good morning ma'am 
(or sir)' as we boarded. He then drove efficiently and with a 
smile through the morning rush, encouraging people to en- 
joy their day as he sent them on their way. It is a privilege to 
be escorted to work by a person who enjoys his job and 
takes the time to share that enthusiasm. The expressions on 
the faces of my fellow passengers told the story better than 
this letter." 



Richard Jones (77th Street garage) was thanked by 
Marilyn Jackson, of East 78th Street, "for his assistance and 
understanding" one night on a No. 3 King Drive bus. "After 
I was seated, an agitator boarded the bus and proceeded to 
harass me. The driver then approached him and indicated 
he would have to leave the bus if he continued. The agitator 
took another seat without any more conversation, but began 
to stare and make angry faces at me. Before leaving the bus, 
I thanked the driver and indicated 1 was frightened that the 
agitator was also leaving. The driver assured me he would 
not let the man off at my stop." 



Vytautas Stukelis (Archer garage) was appreciated by 
Stanley Skalski, of South Menard Avenue, for the safe and 
courteous way he operated his No. 99 Stevenson Express 
bus. "While attending classes at the National Safety Council, 
on North Michigan Avenue, I had the opportunity on 
several occasions of riding a bus that was driven by this 
outstanding driver. 1 base this observation on my past ex- 
perience as a safety supervisor and driver trainer. Not only 
was he a very safe driver, but he was also extremely 
courteous in dealing with his passengers." 



Angel Ramirez (North Park garage) was complimented 
by Joseph Meagher, of Broadway, a senior citizen who rides 
his No. 36 Broadway bus. "He is a good driver, and his 
uniform is neat and clean. He is friendly, polite, and knows 
all the street stops. He does not jerk the bus, and treats the 
public well. I will give him a four-star rating. He is an asset to 
the CTA. The CTA takes me where 1 want to go and back. 
Plenty of seats and fully insured. No bumper to bumper in 
the traffic. So I am very happy with the CTA." 



Donnel Prater (North Park garage)"was so 
courteous, kind, and helpful to all the passengers who 
boarded the (No. 145 Wilson/Michigan Express) bus this 
morning that I would be doing a disservice if I did not 
bring it to your attention." Dorothy Severy, of East Ran- 
dolph Drive, added, "He smiled and said 'Thank you' while 
driving the bus with utmost care and attention, and 
answered questions politely and competently. One 
passenger boarded the bus going in the opposite direction 
from her destination, and he directed her to the correct bus. 
Never at any time did he show impatience." 



Joseph Zukerman (North Park garage) was praised by 
Phil Winick, of North Sheridan Road, for "a very pleasant 
ride home from the Loop" on his No. 147 Outer Drive Ex- 
press bus. "He helped a few handicapped people on and off 
the bus. He treated all passengers with great respect. He 
called the names of all streets that he stopped at, and parked 
the bus along the curb instead of in the middle of the street. I 
thanked him for an enjoyable ride, and he was very pleased 
that someone appreciated his efforts. Train more drivers to 
be courteous, and I know that the people of Chicago will ap- 
preciate it." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Employees honored with 'A Day in CTA' 



Bus Operators James Jones, North 
Park garage, and Elizabeth 
Washington, 77th Street garage, 'Day 
in CTA' honorees, display certificates 
of special recognition presented to 
them by Transportation Manager 
James Blaa for their outstanding 



records of performance. Operator 
Jones has been Employee of the Year 
for four consecutive years and Ms. 
Washington has been commended by 
the riding public for outstanding ser- 
vice as a bus operator. 



Thanks — for a job 
well done 

Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 

Willie Arrington. North Park 
Jessie Bolian, North Park 
Jean Cage, North Park 
Earl Carson, North Park 
Nathaniel Dickson, Limits 
Pedro Exposito, Forest Glen 
Johnnie Goines, North Park 
August Hallmann, Forest Glen 
John Hanna, 77th Street 
William Harris Jr., 77th Street 
Booker Henry, Washington 
Jerry Houston, 77th Street 

Cecil Lawrence, 77th Street 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
William Markowski, Forest Glen 
Larry Means, Beverly 
Timothy Mulvey, Beverly 

Thomas Reilly, Far South 
Tony Richardson, North Park 
Clarence Speights, Lawndale 
Dolores Sullivan, North Avenue 
Blanca Torres, Forest Glen 
Barbara Townsend, 77th Street 

Javid Wasson, North Park 
Pearlie Williams, North Park 
Willie Wofford. North Rail Dist. 
Martha Woods, North Park 



Newborn 

Patrick Carolan, bus mechanic at 
North Avenue garage, and his wife, 
Cristianne, are the proud parents of a 
son, Nathaniel, born July 29 at Gott- 
lieb Memorial Hospital. The baby 
weighed seven pounds, 14 ounces. 
Nathaniel is the Cardans' first child. 



Internal auditor 
qualifies as CPA 

Janice (Jae) Rowell, a CTA Internal 
Auditor since June 1980, has been 
approved by the State of Illinois as a 
Certified Public Accountant, and may 
now be licensed. Miss Rowell qualified 
as a CPA after passing the State ex- 
amination this spring. 

She is Treasurer of the Chicago 
Chapter of the National Association of 
Black Accountants, and holds a 
Bachelor of Science degree in Ac- 
counting from Southern Illinois 
University. 




Legal scholar 

Tamara Rodgers, a 1982 graduate 
of Loyola University with a degree in 
political science, was the recipient of a 
Loyola University Law School scholar- 
ship. She was enrolled in August. Miss 
Rodgers is the daughter of Mrs. 
Thelma Rodgers, Administrative Ser- 
vices, Duplicating section. 



Dean's commendation 

Clarence K. Bourne, the son of 
David L. Bourne, RTA Travel Infor- 
mation Representative, has been com- 
mended by Northwestern University's 
dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences for distinguished academic 
achievement during the spring 
quarter. The dean's commendation is 
awarded to students who achieve a 
grade point average of 3.75 or higher 
on a 4.0 system. 



AUGUST. 1982 



Ten years 
serving transit 

The CTA Technical Institute ob- 
served a dual milestone this month as 
it marked its 10th year and conducted 
its 50th session, a more modern ver- 
sion in step with the '80s. 

Transit personnel from seven major 
cities and the nation's capital par- 
ticipated in a one-week program 
designed to bring a greater awareness 
of problems common to most transit 
properties today. 

The Technical Institute has always 
provided its participants with valuable, 
first-hand information on the opera- 
tions and functions of the CTA, the 
nation's second largest transit system. 
The 50th CTATI, while sounding off 
about a system that provides more 
than 2.5 million rides daily, also dealt 
with the gut issues of survival in the 
midst of an inflationary economy. 

The Technical Institute maintains its 
platform to share, through personal 
communication, the technical exper- 
tise of CTA and other transit systems. 
At the same time, it is dealing with 
more intangible monetary problems, 
since, more than ever before, main- 
taining good mass transit requires a 
greater efficiency in the fiscal as well at 
the technical matters of the transit in- 
dustry. In short, the CTATI is dealing 
with issues which cover the spectrum 
of things as they are and as they could 
be. 

Since August 14, 1972, when the 
first CTA Technical Institute con- 
vened, more than 800 people from 
across the nation and around the 
world have participated and have 
gone away with new insights. 

As the transit industry deals with the 
problems of the '80s, CTATI coor- 
dinators are determined to continue 
presenting stimulating issues and to in- 
fluence the thought-provoking deci- 
sions of those who participate in this 
one-of-a-kind brain trust for mass 
transportation. 



CTfl 



i J. 






Participants in the Juiy, 1982, CTATi shared a cake commemorating the 50th session and 
10th anniversary of the CTA Technical Institute. 




Participants visit several operating locations Including the Howard Elevated Terminal, 
the Clark Junction Switch Tower, and the State Street Subway tube shown above. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




At the end of each CTATI, participants and guests ride CTA's 
4000-serles Historic Rapid Transit Train to the certificate presen- 
tation and closing luncheon. 




Other highlights Include tours of CTA's shops and Maintenance 
Training Center. 



AUGUST, 1982 




CTA at work 

ChicagoFest service 

ChicagoFest is the largest special event CTA serves dur- 
ing the year--it touches nearly every CTA department and 
involves thousands of employees. Nearly one million per- 
sons attended ChicagoFest last year. 

The basic CTA service plan for the first ChicagoFest in 
1978 was so thoroughly worked out that it is still in use, with 
some "fine tuning" here and there. 

A CTA representative met repeatedly with represen- 
tatives of agencies and organizations involved in staging 
Mayor Byrne's ChicagoFest at Navy Pier August 4 through 
August 15. 

These coordination meetings usually begin in June with 
representatives of Festivals, Inc., which stages ChicagoFest; 
the Chicago Department of Public Works; the Chicago 
Department of Streets and Sanitation's Bureau of Street 
Traffic and Bureau of Streets, and the Chicago Police 
Department. 

The traffic control by the Chicago Police Department at 
the CTA's bus terminal at Navy Pier keeps the CTA's bus 
lines and the specially chartered free bus service moving 
with optimum efficiency, despite the huge crowds of 
pedestrians and large numbers of motorists in the terminal's 
vicinity. 

The major "fine tuning" that CTA had to make to its bus 
service plan this year involved relocating its giant bus waiting 
area and nearby passenger terminal to Illinois Street and 
Streeter Drive. 

This was due to the construction of the new 25,000-seat 
Main Stage just south of Navy Pier's entrance where the 
Chicago Fire Department's gymnasium stood for many 
years. 

The Main Stage was an addition to ChicagoFest. The 
original 15,000-seat area just north of Navy Pier's entrance 



Coordinated planning with Festivals, Inc., and various city depart- 
ments enables CTA to move huge crowds In and out of 
ChicagoFest quickly. 

had its name changed to the Rock Stage. 

If both of these places emptied at once, CTA could have 
had a mob scene on its hands. CTA worked out an arrange- 
ment with representatives of Festivals, Inc., to have the 
shows end about 30 to 45 minutes apart because most peo- 
ple who attended those nighttime shows leave ChicagoFest. 

The only way many of them could get to their destinations 
was by CTA bus lines or by chartered free shuttle buses serv- 
ing the lakefront parking facilities and the commuter railroad 
stations. 

Last year's crowd of nearly one million ChicagoFest 
visitors was surveyed by Festivals, Inc., and 80 per cent of 
them indicated they used CTA buses or free chartered shut- 
tle buses to get there. 

Most of the remaining 20 per cent indicated they walked 
west on Grand Avenue to either CTA bus or rapid transit 
service or to their parked cars. 

For this year's ChicagoFest, radio station WMET-FM 
chartered 290 buses for Soldier Field parking lot users; 225 
buses for those using Monroe or Grant Park parking 
facilities, and 108 buses for shuttles to and from the LaSalle, 
North Western, and Union commuter railroad stations. 

CTA added extra service on five bus lines and five rapid 
transit routes for convenient riding to and from ChicagoFest. 
Hours of service also were extended to encourage riders to 
use CTA service. 

The first day of each ChicagoFest is sort of a dress re- 
hearsal for the rest of the run. It is during that first day that 
CTA makes its "fine tuning" adjustments to give riders op- 
timum service. 

Assisting in planning or operations were such CTA groups 
as the Routes and Systems Section, Schedule Section, 
Street Traffic Section, and Passenger Controls/Graphics 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Chicago Police lielp CTA provide efficient service by l<eeping new 
bus waiting area on Illinois Street clear for CTA buses. 



Section, all of the Operations Planning Department; and the 
Transportation Department's Bus Service and Rail Service 
Sections, along with their many area, district, and street 
supervisors. 

Also, the Equipment Engineering and Maintenance 
Department's mobile repair bus and mechanics service 
buses at the ChicagoFest site. There were numerous 
volunteer bus information representatives who assisted in 
directing the throngs of persons to buses to take them to 
their destinations. These volunteers came mostly from the 
CTA's headquarters offices. 

What about ChicagoFest '83? 

Next June's "fine tuning" will insure efficient service. 



More June Graduates 





Laon Htnry Fields Jr. 

Brool<wood Jr. H.S. 

Leon Henry Fields Sr. 

61st Street Shop 



Carol Lasniak 

Resurrection H.S. 
Ted Lesniak 
Skokle Shop 




Happy anniversary 

Congratulations to Onofrio and Rose Mary Suranno, who 
renewed their wedding vows at Immaculate Conception 
Church in Chicago in celebration of their 50th anniversary 
on October 18, 1981. Well-wishers in attendance included 
the nine other members of their original wedding party. 
Onofrio Suranno retired on January 1, 1968, as a machinist 
at South Shops, after 42 years of CTA service. 




AUGUST, 1982 



CTA at work 

Riders benefit from 
efficient track work 

A carefully planned and coordinated weekend project 
recently enabled CTA to accomplish major track work, 
while saving money and providing minimal inconvenience 
to riders. 

An 82-ton 'L' track diamond crossover was assembled in 
five sections in a parking lot by CTA employees and hoisted 
by cranes 30 feet onto the Lake Street elevated embank- 
ment at Marion Street in Oak Park. 

Just before the installation of the 170-foot-long by 
23-foot-wide track facility, 600 feet of track (300 feet in each 
direction) were removed and 600 tons of crushed limestone 
ballast were replaced on the concrete wall embankment. 

The installation of the new crossover, which will provide 
additional operating flexibility for Lake Street trains, is part 
of a CTA capital improvement project for track renewal of 
the Lake Street line. The entire crossover installation was 
accomplished on the weekend of June 26 and 27, thanks to 
the tightly-scheduled efforts of more than 100 employees. 

Monday morning rush period riders on Lake Street trains 
were unaware of the engineering fete that they passed un- 
noticed at Marion Street. 

"We estimate we spared riders at least four consecutive 
weekends of single-track operations at Marion and saved 
CTA about $100,000 in labor and contractual costs by this 
carefully-timed maneuver," said Thomas Wolgemuth, 
Manager, Facilities Engineering and Maintenance Depart- 
ment. 

During the weekend-long project, the Transportation 
Department operated shuttle buses on Lake Street between 
Harlem terminal and Austin station with east and westbound 
stops at Oak Park and Ridgeland stations in between. Infor- 
mational graphics were supplied by Operations Planning 
Department. 

Beginning on June 1 in the parking lot east of Austin 
Avenue and north of Lake, track employees assembled the 
cohiponents of the diamond crossover. 

Among the employees of West Shops taking part in the 
project were Walter Gaedtke, Superintendent, Power and 
Way; Tom Staunton, Unit Supervisor, Track Construction; 
James Johnson, Unit Supervisor, Structure Maintenance; 
Pat McCarthy, Supervisor, Track and Structures, and 
Robert Stavinga, Supervisor, Track and Roadway. 

Stan Kaderbek, Structural Engineer, and Ray Shrieks, 
Civil Engineer, drew the specifications for the project. They 
are in the Design and Construction group of the Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance Department. 

Kaderbek, who acted as project engineer and coor- 
dinator, explained that the project included five parts--the 
central diamond to permit trains to be switched from the east 
to westbound tracks, and vice versa, and four turnouts con- 
necting the ends of the central diamond to the remaining 
running rails. 

These five parts, weighing a total of 82 tons, were spiked 
to 190 timber ties, assembled individually, and trucked to 
the Marion Street site and hoisted into place. New 300-foot- 
long sections of third (power) rail also were installed along 




CTA crane removes 600 tons of ballast from Lake elevated em- 
bankment onto Lake Street at Marion Street, Oak Park. 




Contractor's cranes hoist 34-ton diamond crossover component 
from truck onto 'L' embankment. 

both sides of the new crossover. 

The center diamond, Kaderbek added, weighs 34 tons; 
each of the four turnouts weighs 12 tons. The five sections 
were bolted together and then bolted to the existing tracks. 

"The 82-ton project was completed on schedule and fit 
precisely, just as we designed it to do--thanks to the com- 
bined efforts of our Track and Structures crew," Kaderbek 
said proudly. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



241 

golf outing 

The Local 241 (ATU) annual golf 
outing at the Cog Hill Golf & Country 
Club, Lemont, attracted 120 persons 
for dinner, and 88 golfers who braved 
the rain soaked fairways and be- 
puddled putting greens for the 18-hole 
tourney on July 10. 





Lining up for the tournament are (from left) Walter Caston, Transportation; Dianna 
Caston, Travel Information; Islafi Thomas, Local 241; Robert Holmes, 52nd Street; George 
Oalmas, Assistant to Local 241 President; Gene DaszkowskI, North Avenue; James 
Toolls, pensioner; Horace Browning, North Avenue; Goldle Downing, Local 241 Board 
Member; Lettle Robinson, Station Clerk, and Tim O'Rourke, Claims. 




Islah Thomas, Local 241 Recording 
Secretary, builds confidence on the prac- 
tice putting green. 



Ready to brave the watery fairways were (from left, standing) James Toolls, pensioner; 
James Janaszak, North Park; George Walker, Station Clerk; Robert O'Connor, Manager, 
Labor Relations; James Elliott, South Shops, golf outing chairman; Robert Holmes, 52nd 
Street; Goldle Downing, Local 241 Board Member; Willie McCain, Dist. "A"; Bob Legg, 
pensioner, and Ralph Bellamy, Station Clerk. First row (from left) are Isiah Thomas, Local 
241 Recording Secretary; Gene DaszkowskI, North Avenue; Dianna Caston, Travel infor- 
mation, and Horace Browning, North Avenue. 




Congressman Gus Savage (2nd Dist.) speaks to dinner guests at 
Cog Hill. Behind Savage Is George Dalmas, Assistant to Local 241 
President. Seated are Elcosle Gresham (left). Local 241 1st Vice 
President, and Charles Hall, Local 241 Financial Secretary. 



Charles Hall (left), Local 241 Financial Secretary, presents low 
gross golfing trophy won by Luster Morton, Dist. "A", to Willie 
Thames, Lawndale, who accepted for Morton. Next to Thames is 
Islah Thomas, Local 241 Recording Secretary; Elcosle Gresham, 
Local 241 1 st Vice President, and James Elliott, South Shops, golf 
outing chairman. 



AUGUST, 1982 



For \;our benefit 

Protecting your survivors 
through your pension program 



The previous three For [^our benefit columns have ex- 
plained in detail how your retirement allowance is calculated 
under your Normal Form of retirement, and how you may 
choose to provide financial protection for your spouse dur- 
ing the years immediately preceding your retirement (Pre- 
Retirement Option) or after your retirement (Post- 
Retirement Option). In essence, CTA not only provides a 
generous monthly pension during your retirement, but also 
provides you with the opportunity to insure that your spouse 
will receive approximately one-half, two-thirds, or full 
monthly pension benefits should you die first. 



Normal Form 

Under the Normal Form of retirement, your annual pen- 
sion allotment is determined by calculations shown in the May 
issue of Transit News. These calculations are based upon the 
average annual salary of your four (4) highest eeiming years dur- 
ing the ten (10) yeeirs preceding your retirement, and your 
number of years of service with CTA and its predecessor com- 
panies. The doDar amount resulting from these calculations is 
your Normal Form Retirement Allotment. 

Before or after your retirement under the Normal Form, 
if you die before your spouse and your spouse is your 
primary beneficiary, your spouse would receive: (1) a death 
benefit which varies between $1,000 and $4,000 (based on 
your age at time of death and years of service); and (2) the 
difference between the amount of money that you had con- 
tributed to the Retirement Plan and the total amount of 
retirement allowance paid to you before your death, if the 
amount of your contribution is greater than the amount of 
retirement allowance paid to you. 



Pre-Retirement Option 

If you have completed 30 years of service, or if you are at 
least 55 years of age and have completed at least three years 
of service, you may select the Pre-Retirement Surviving 
Spouse Option. 

Choosing this added benefit is a lot like providing life in- 
surance with your spouse as beneficiary, and a slight 
"premium" or reduction (less than one per cent), based 
upon the length of time the option is in effect before your 
death or retirement, will slightly reduce your Normal Form 
Retirment Allotment. 

If you live until retirement you will receive your Normal 
Form Retirement Allotment, minus the slight reduction 
mentioned above. 

If you die before retirement and you are survived by your 
spouse, your Normal Form Retirement Allotment will be 
calculated as if you had retired on your date of death, the reduc- 
tion of less than one per cent will be deducted, and your spouse 
will receive approximately one-half of your Normal Form 
Retirement Allotment until your spouse's death. 



Post-Retirement Options 

The provisions of the Pre-Retirement Option end on your 
retirement date. If you had not chosen the Pre-Retirement 
Surviving Spouse Option, you would have been entitled to 
receive your Normal Form Retirement Allotment. If you 
had chosen the Pre-Retirement Surviving Spouse Option, 
you would be entitled to your Normal Form Retirement 
Allotment minus the slight reduction incurred by choosing the 
Pre-Retirement Option. The entitlement that applies to you 
on your date of retirement is used as the base for calculating 
Post-Retirement Options, and will be referred to as Normal 
Retirement Allotment in this section. Under the Normal 
Form, this entitlement would be paid to you until your death. 

Post-Retirement Options also offer six other choices. 
Since each of these options provides additional financial 
security for your spouse, each option also effects an ac- 
tuarial reduction to your retirement allowance based on the 
option selected and your age and your spouse's age at the 
time of your retirement. 

Post-Retirement Options A-y2, A-^/s. and A-ALL 
provide you with your Normal Retirement Allotment 
minus the appropriate actuarial reduction until your death. If 
you die before your spouse, your spouse will receive either 
one-half (A-V2), two-thirds (A-^s), or the full amount 
(A-ALL) of the amount that you were receiving. Your 
spouse will receive this amount until her/his death. 

Post-Retirement Options B-V2, 8-^3. and B-ALL 
provide you with your Normal Retirement Allotment 
minus the appropriate actuarial reduction until your death. If 
you die before your spouse, your spouse will receive either 
one-half (B-'/z), two-thirds (B-^/a), or the full amount 
(B-ALL) of the amount that you were receiving. Additional- 
ly, under the B-'/z, B-^s, and B-ALL options, if your 
spouse dies first, after your spouse's death, you will receive 
your full Normal Retirement Allotment because the ac- 
tuarial reductions for the B-Options last only until your 
spouse's death. 

A chart showing how Post-Retirement Options are 
applied appeared in the For your benefit article in the July 
Transit News. 

If you do not specifically choose a Post-Retirement Op- 
tion when you submit your Retirement Application to the 
Pension Section, you will be given the Automatic A-V2 
Option. 

in summary, there are several ways that you can use your 
pension program to provide financial security for your 
spouse. Retirement Allowances and actuarial reductions are 
different in all cases because they are determined by salary 
levels, years of service, options chosen, and ages of 
employees and spouses. 

The best way to decide how you would like to use your 
retirement program to best suit your needs is to call the Pen- 
sion Section at 929-5750. They will be happy to explain 
all of your options in detail. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



JOINING THE ranks 
of the retired on 
August 1 was MAR- 
JORIE ORGAN, who 
had more than 40 
years of service 
with CTA and Its 
predecessor com- 
panies. 




IIsT I^/a:E!DVLOR,I-A.I^ 



MARIE BLANCHFIELD, 81, West Section, 

Emp. 11-24-40, Died 6-20-82 
NUNZIO BONTEMPO, 86, Way & Structs., 

Emp 5-1-29, Died 6-24-82 
OLIVER CARROLL, 71, Maintenance, 

Emp, 4-29-49, Died 6-19-82 
FRANK CHRISTENSEN, 81, 77th Street, 

Emp, 10-12-28, Died 6-27-82 
PETER DOLJANIN, 87, Way & Structs., 

Emp. 10-25-22, Died 5-21-82 
CLYDE EWING, 61, North Avenue, 

Emp. 9-6-51, Died 6-13-82 
WILLIAM GERBER, 65, Stores, 

Emp. 11-24-47, Died 6-14-82 
WALTER HANSON, 69, West Section. 

Emp. 10-5-40, Died 6-24-82 
WALTER HELMER, 90, Engineering, 

Emp. 2-21-17, Died 6-20-82 



JOHN BASSETT, Motorman. 

Ashland, Emp. 2-19-62 
ROBERT BLAIR, Instructor, 

North Section, Emp. 9-12-60 
WILLIAM BUERGER, Elect. Worker, 

Maintenance, Emp. 7-10-52 
MARY BURROWS, Ticket Agent, 

West Section, Emp. 2-24-62 
FRANK KATKUS, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 3-16-46 
OTTO KRUEGER, Painter, 

West Shops, Emp. 9-19-51 
MATTHEW KUZNIAR, Iron Worker Hlpr. 

West Shops, Emp. 1-17-47 
EDWARD MARYNIW, Inspector, 

Security, Emp. 3-4-74 
MARSHALL MILLER, Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 9-10-73 



MICHAEL HUSAYKO, 78, South Shops, 

Emp. 7-22-26, Died 6-22-82 
JOSEPH lACONO, 68, District C. 

Emp. 7-8-48, Died 6-30-82 
JAMES JEFFERY, 65, Limits. 

Emp. 9-12-47, Died 6-3-82 
FRED KEISERS, 96, West Shops. 

Emp. 11-4-18. Died 5-30-82 
VANCE LAWRENCE, 71, South Shops, 

Emp 8-18-41, Died 6-23-82 
FRED LEDDER, 77, North Section. 

Emp. 8-14-41. Died 6-28-82 
JOHN LEMKE, 65. 61st Street. 

Emp. 10-28-41. Died 6-20-82 
THOMAS MADIGAN. 77. Stores, 

Emp. 9-22-27, Died 6-7-82 
JAMES McNULTY, 80, 69th Street, 

Emp 5-1-37. Died 6-12-82 
PAUL PARROTT, 65, North Section, 

Emp 10-8-75, Died 6-20-82 
ALOYSIUS ROHRER, 83, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 11-4-42, Died 4-9-82 



MARJORIE ORGAN, Cont Clerk II, 

Financial Services, Emp. 1-16-41 
ROBERT RISE, Tab. Mach. Oper III, 

Datacenter, Emp. 6-24-54 
JOHN ROSELAND Jr., Carpenter, 

South Shops, Emp. 1-2-62 
ROBERT TIERNEY. Supervisor, 

District A, Emp. 11-19-64 
ROY VAUGHN, Clerk II, 

Public Affairs, Emp. 12-20-65 



DISABILfTY RETIREMENT 

WILLIAM MURRAY, Lineman. 
West Shops. Emp. 12-15-47 



ROBERT ROSS. 49. South Shops. 

Emp. 9-16-57. Died 7-3-82 
EDWIN RUTKOWSKI. 77. North Avenue, 

Emp. 12-7-27, Died 6-9-82 
ROBERT SCHAGEMAN, 66, Opers. Ping. 

Emp. 1-28-37, Died 6-3-82 
FRANK SCHRACK, 73, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 4-24-43, Died 6-22-82 
LEROY SIMPSON, 90, Insurance, 

Emp. 11-8-22, Died 6-30-82 
JOHN STATEN, 48, West Section, 

Emp. 8-1-63, Died 8-2-82 
HELEN STEARNS, 51, 77th Street, 

Emp. 5-10-76, Died 7-7-82 
JOSEPH STRAND, 84, South Shops, 

Emp. 1-24-22, Died 6-19-82 
PATRICK SULLIVAN, 86, 52nd Street. 

Emp. 9-20-43. Died 6-15-82 
JACOB SUMNER. 64. Opers. Ping., 

Emp 6-15-37. Died 6-8-82 
MERVIN WALLACE. 78, Forest Glen, 

Emp 9-8-26, Died 4-28-82 



Service anniversaries in August 



40 years 




Bernhardt Nielsen Alexander Pavesic 

Electrical Electrical 




John Schwartz 

Consumer Services 



35 years 



James Dudley, Equip. Eng./Maint. 
Katy Dunn, West Section 
Francis Flynn, Beverly 
Albert Heron, South Shops 
William Kalboth, North Avenue 
Timothy Murphy, Beverly 
Wallace Petersen, Beverly 
Frank Ponzio, Schedules 
Clifton Servant, 77th Street 
Eugene Simpson, Skokie Shop 
Howard Surrett, Utility 
Theodore SutkowskI, South Shops 
Claudius Worland, Law 

30 years 

Michael Bogira, 54th Shop 
Gaetano Faglolo, Harlem 
Walter Hallford, Maintenance 
Rogers Harmon, Lawndale 
Henry Hughes, Kimball 
Mary Lyall, Payroll 
Cleo Marsh, Archer 
Carl McQuay. Lawndale 
Willard Moses, Archer 
Kenneth Peterson, Bus Service 



George Richmond Jr., Ashland/95th 
James Short, Archer 
Willie Stevens, Lawndale 

25 years 

Joseph Abercrombie, District C 
Harold Abrams, Beverly 
William Bettison. 52nd Street 
Lee Catchings, Beverly 
Wesley Cobbs, Washington 
Robert Darrow, North Avenue 
Curtis English Jr., Forest Glen 
Willie Fultz, Utility 
Martin Hautzinger, Limits 
Monroe Jackson, District A 
Clifton Jones, 77th Street 
Olan Kellog Jr., Central Counting 
Charles Laughlin, West Section 
Robert O'Neal, Lawndale 
Samuel Patton Jr., West Section 
Claude Rogers, 77th Street 
Albert Strickland, 77th Street 
Otis Thomas, Maintenance 
Marvin Tucker, 77th Street 
Roy Washington, Maintenance 
John Woods, Agent Office 
A.C. Works, Utility 



AUGUST, 1982 



75 



Discovering 
Chicago 



Four members of Broadway Com- 
munity Service Center's Discovery 
Club, taking part in a city-wide 
treasure hunt using public transit, 
check in with Sgt. Bill Nielsen, Securi- 
ty Guard at CTA's Merchandise Mart 
headquarters on July 29. Youngsters 
in white T-shirts are (from left) John 
Siadowski, 15; Miguel Nogueras, 16; 
Ted Filipek, 15, and Carl Blachut, 15. 
At left is Joe Bussie, outreach worker 
for Chicago Department of Human 
Services. Forty members of the 
Discovery Club took part in the 
treasure hunt by riding CTA to check- 
points at locations throughout the 
CTA system. After their check-in with 
Sgt. Nielsen, the young foursome 
headed for Lerner's Newspaper office. 




7519 N. Ashland Avenue; CTA's Jef- 
ferson Park transit center; Loyola 
University's Mertz Hall; Sheriff Richard 
J. Elrod's office in Daley Civic Center; 
office of U.S. Senator Alan J. Dixon. 



230 S. Dearborn Street, and Chicago 
Department of Neighborhoods in City 
Hall. All returned to the Broadway 
Community Center, 4554 Broadway, 
for lunch and awards. 



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Volume 35 



Numbers 



Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Group, Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphic by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Production Assistant; Editorial Assistant: 

Mel Alexander Rick Willis 

Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734. Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555. Chicago. Il- 
linois 60654. 



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P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



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A 







Vacant CTA property 
turned into showplace 



Ed Gandy is a man who sees possibilities in the seemingly 
impossible. 

About five years ago Gandy saw the possibilities of turn- 
ing three dilapidated Victorian buildings in the shadow of 
the Cabrini-Green housing project into something beautiful 
and profitable. 

However, two of the buildings (on one lot) were on the 
south side of the Ravenswood 'L' tracks, and the other 
building was north of the tracks. Both properties have side 
yards next to the tracks. Between them, stretching under the 
tracks, was a piece of vacant land in the 1500 block of North 
Cleveland Street. 

How, Gandy pondered, could he tie all three buildings 
together with the piece of vacant CTA property separating 
them. 

First, he purchased the three buildings (one had a demoli- 
tion sign plastered on it). Second, he took his dream of 
creating something beautiful out of almost nothing to ar- 
chitect Ted Morningstar who agreed to take on Candy's 
dream. 



Candy's garden showing plantings with globed light standard in 
shadow of tracks. Grass is a special sun/shade variety. 

The third, and most important step Gandy took, was 
telephoning the CTA's Real Estate Department about the 
vacant land under the tracks. 

Gandy learned the CTA has an active program of renting 
yard and garden plots on the 18 miles of elevated structure 
right-of-way along the Ravenswood, North-South, West- 
Northwest, and the Skokie Swift routes. 

The CTA has 177 yard and garden lots of various sizes it 
rents at an average rate of $24 a year. Each licensee must 
clean up, and keep clean, the plots they are using. 

Gandy, who owns a successful near north side chicken 
and ribs business, plus an 800-acre vegetable farm near 
Montgomery, Alabama, nourished his dream with the stuff 
that makes most dreams come true--money. 

To be exact, Gandy has invested $220,000 in his dream, 
and it shows, particularly the park-like setting created on 
either side and under the Ravenswood 'L' tracks. The 
"park" is used by the residents of the five smartly-updated 
units in his buildings. (Continued on page 2} 

FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 
SEPTEMBER, 1982 




If there is a word for Candy's park, it is chic. 

It measures 100 by 125 feet and is flanked by the moder- 
nized residences on its north and south sides and protected 
on its east and west sides by handsome 5V2-foot high red 
brick walls replete with wrought iron self-locking gates. 

Through this handsome setting, one can see the pillars 
supporting the Ravenswood 'L' route tracks that give the 
greensward of special A34 sun/shade grass a touch of high- 
tech chic. 

Along the buildings facing the park are 5V2-foot-high ar- 
bor vitae shrubs, pruned to tailored perfection. 

On the lawn are seven 18-inch diameter globe lamps on 
seven-foot-high wrought iron standards rising out of circular 
plantings of petunias. Low clumps of Japanese yews accent 
concrete sidewalks in the park. 

Facing the park on a new garage behind the north side 
two-flat is a handsome, cream-colored, concrete 10 by 
25-foot raised patio, replete with its wrought iron fence, 
three umbrella tables and matching chairs, and a red brick 
bar with its brown-and-cream-striped canopy. Inside the 




Terraced concrete patio with striped awning over barbeque- 
equipped bar against new garage containing a powder room. 




Ed Candy's yard and garden plots under the Ravenswood 'L' 
tracks in the 1500 block of North Cleveland Street. View is to the 
southwest section of Candy's and the CTA's property. 



garage is a powder room for guests of the buildings' 
residents' use during lawn parties. 

To help soften the geometric effect of the horizontal lines 
of the walls, walks, and clipped hedges and the vertical lines 
of the pillars supporting the 'L' structure. Candy's wife, 
Dilcy, planted flowering crab trees in the lawn's open 
spaces. 

"We took out about 30 truck-loads of rocks and debris, 
going down about a foot and a half to subsoil," Candy 
recalled. "We replaced that with 2,000 cubic yards of fresh 
topsoil over which we placed about 1,300 square yards of 
special A34 sun/shade grass sod around the 12 'L' pillars." 

The three buildings Candy rehabilitated now contain five 
rental units. They produce substantial rentals to help pay for 
Candy's vision of turning the seemingly impossible into the 
possible. 

"If I can do it," he said philosophically, sitting at an um- 
brella table on his patio in his sun-dappled garden, "so can 
anyone else." 



CTA rents 
garden lots 
for private use 

"We wish everyone who has prop- 
erty adjacent to the CTA's 'L' structure 
would take advantage of its yard and 
garden licensing program," said Mer- 
ritt Kotin, Director, Real Estate Section 
in the Law Department. 

"There are 177 yard and garden lots 
now being used under 'L' structures or 
along 'L' right-of-ways, such as on the 
Skokie Swift," he said. "Admittedly, 
they are not as sophisticated as Mr. 
Candy's, but they provide abutting 
property owners access to additional 
space at a nominal yearly amount 
-$24. 

"We only ask the licensees to clean 
up their plots and keep them free from 
debris as long as they hold the 
licenses. 

"This arrangement helps beautify 
the land under the 'L' structures and 
helps our neighbors who want to put 
the plots to good noncommercial 
use," he said. 

Kotin said the licensing of yard and 
garden plots was started many years 
ago by the Chicago Rapid Transit 
Company, a predecessor to the CTA. 
When the CTA took over the 'L' 
system in 1947, it continued the yard 
and garden licensing policy. 

Only persons who occupy residen- 
tial property along the tracks can get a 
yard and garden license, Kotin added. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



From the 
Chairman 



Being there 



Now that CTA is operating under strict, line item 
budgeting to insure the most efficient use of operating funds, 
every employee performs an important job, and every 
employee's job performance affects the overall performance 
of the Authority. To keep our transit system operating prop- 
erly, we must have consistent, high quality job perform- 
ance from all employees, and one of the most significant 
measurements of employee consistency is the attendance 
record . 

While the effects of absenteeism and tardiness may be 
most immediately realized in our operation and 
maintenance functions through resultant service problems, 
inconsistent attendance can adversely affect the efficiency of 
every work area throughout CTA. 

An employee who frequently takes unwarranted 
absences, reports late for work, extends the length of lunch 
or break periods, or frequently leaves the work location 
without good reason, is demonstrating a serious lack of 
responsibility toward job performance and a lack of con- 
sideration for fellow employees. All too often, casual attend- 
ance left uncorrected can cause other employees to share 
the burden created by the inconsistent employee, or to have 
their work delayed by the inability to perform timely and effi- 
cient coordination between job functions. Ultimately, this 
results in a reduction in the efficiency of the work unit and 
lower morale for all employees in the unit. 

Insuring observance of CTA work schedules is one of the 
most important duties of supervisory personnel. I therefore 
direct all supervisory personnel to carefully monitor 
absenteeism, tardiness, and attendance records of all 
employees in all classifications, and identify those 
employees who demonstrate a lack of responsibility through 
casual attendance practices. Poor attendance must not be 
tolerated, and supervisory employees must use every cor- 
rective and disciplinary action at their disposal, including 
undertiming, suspension, and termination, to insure proper 
attendance by all employees. 

If we all dedicate ourselves to consistent, high quality per- 
formance, we will continue to provide the high quality trans- 
it service that the people of Chicago expect and deserve, 
and we can all take pride in doing a good job. 



>^2..>^5<2. 



Honor Roadeo winners 
at banquet 

Winners of the 1982 Bus Roadeo were honored at a ban- 
quet Friday, August 20, at the M&M Club in the Merchan- 
dise Mart. 

Operator John Odom of 69th Street garage, winner of 
the first-place trophy, was presented the distinctive cup by 
Executive Director Bernard J. Ford and Transportation 
Manager James Blaa. Odom will represent the CTA at the 
American Public Transit Association (APTA) International 
Bus Roadeo in Boston. The event will be held in October. 

Other award recipients were second and fourth-place 
winners Michael Matas and Jesse Moore. Third-place win- 
ner Robert Richardson, who was not present for the occa- 
sion, received his trophy later. 

The Chairman's Cup was awarded to the 69th Street 
garage. Accepting the award were Odom, Garage 
Superintendent Tom Riley, and Director of Transportation 
Personnel Harry Reddrick. The Chairman's Cup will remain 
at the 69th Street garage until an operator from another 
garage takes first-place Roadeo honors. 

CTA Roadeo belt buckles, patches, and movie theater 
tickets were also presented to members of the 1982 Roadeo 
Winning Circle 20. 




Showing off their 1982 Bus Roadeo trophies as Director of 
Training-Utility Edward Mitchell stands with them are (from left) 
Jesse Moore, Beverly garage, fourth place; Mitchell, John Odom, 
69th Street garage, first place; and Michael Matas, Forest Glen 
garage, second place. Robert Richardson, North Park garage, 
third place winner, was not present. Others are members of the 
1982 Bus Roadeo Winning Circle 20. 




The Chairman's Cup, awarded for the first time In the annual CTA 
Bus Roadeo, was presented to 69th Street garage by Executive 
Director Bemard J. Ford. The garage took the plaaue when 
Operator John Odom, assigned to 69th Street, won first place 
Roadeo honors for 1982. 



SEPTEMBER. 1982 



Sergio Villanueva (North Park 
garage) kept the tempers of 
riders cool when the air con- 
ditioning on his No. 156 
LaSalle bus failed, according 
to Mary Jo Strusz, of Surf 
Street. "He was pleasant to 
everyone who got on the bus, 
and even managed to smile. 
About half way through Lin- 
coln Park, when the bus was 
becoming really unbearable, 
he stopped, walked back and 
told everyone they could 
open the window latches. 
Some of the people couldn't 
get them open, so he stopped 
to help them. Everyone was 
smiling and talking about the 
great driver. It's nice knowing 
someone out there cares." 




Billy Ragsdale (52nd Street 
garage) was appreciated by 
Lola Brokemond, of Jeffery 
Boulevard, for his courtesy 
on a No. 14 South Lake Shore 
Express bus. "He was patient 
to wait until each passenger 
was standing as comfortably 
as possible before pro- 
ceeding to the next stop. 
When he noticed a 
mechanical problem with the 
bus, he paused briefly to alert 
everyone that the ride would 
be bumpy. No one seemed to 
mind, due to his friendliness. 
When we reached the Loop, 
he clearly announced each 
stop. He bade each 
passenger a good day. All the 
passengers made comments 
as to his concern." 



commendation corner 



Jodie McGuire (North Park garage) was praised by Mary 
Wallace, of West Sheridan Road, for "an act of kindness, 
quick-thinking and honesty" on her No. 147 Outer Drive 
Express bus. "A young lady with an infant got on and put 20 
cents too much in the coin box before she realized her 
mistake. She made no complaint, but when the next 
passenger boarded the bus, this honest, kind driver told her 
to put all but 20 cents into the box and give the remainder to 
the lady who had overpaid. It was so refreshing to see an act 
of simple goodness from one human being to another." 

Betty Spivey (52nd Street garage) was called "an ex- 
cellent, considerate, alert driver" by Marshall Aaron, of East 
56th Street, for having saved him from being the victim of a 
pickpocket on her No. 6 Jeffery Express bus. "A couple of 
young pickpockets followed me as I was going to my seat, 
and one already had his hands in my pocket and was about 
to take my wallet, when she gave me a very timely warning 
- and also warned the other passengers - loud and clear. 
Needless to say, the hoodlums lost no time in getting off the 
bus." 

Leslie Grant (North Section) was the conductor of a 
Ravenswood train that Russell Anderson, of South 
Michigan Avenue, was riding on his way downtown early 
one evening. "I wish to commend your conductor on the 
way he handled an extremely obnoxious intoxicated rider 
who boarded at the Diversey stop. The man was using ex- 
tremely offensive language, and although the conductor 
cautioned him several times to lower his voice, the 
passenger continued his tirade. The conductor put him off 
the train at Chicago Avenue. This made the balance of the 
trip a delight." 



Samuel Adams Jr. (North Park garage) was com- 
plimented by Kerry Larkin, of North Ashland Boulevard, for 
"his helpful and professional work" as operator of a No. 151 
Sheridan bus. "He is always very punctual, which is impor- 
tant for me in getting to work on time. He always checks for 
passes and transfers, even with regular riders, and also en- 
courages the purchase of monthly passes. He is consistent in 
calling out stops, and is courteous and polite to customers. 
Sam is not afraid to ask someone who is rude or threatening 
to get off the bus, or to call police if they persist." 

Robert Sosnowski (Archer garage) was commended for 
"his outstanding service and most pleasant personality" by 
Jackie LaMarr, of South Western Avenue, who was a rider 
on his 51st Street bus. "This driver had a kind word for each 
and every person boarding his bus. He said 'Good morning' 
to everyone, and how refreshing to hear 'Thank you' after 
paying the fare! He even listened patiently while a drunk 
held up the bus to quote the bible. When they were alightng 
the bus, he bid everyone a nice day. With more people like 
him, riders would not mind supporting the rising fares" 

Jonas Barnett (Washington garage) was singled out for 
personal thanks in a letter from Rebecca Rubio, of North 
Lake Shore Drive, that included the names of 34 other 
Special Services people. "Congratulations on the excellent 
care the CTA took in picking out the people associated with 
Special Services. People like Jonas Barnett, who has been 
my driver for over six months on a daily basis and who has 
put in 26 years with the CTA without a sick day. He is a 
gentleman who represents the ultimate in kindness, sen- 
sitivity, dependability, and efficiency, as do all the drivers 
and people behind the scenes in the garage." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Diane Traxler (seated, left), executive secretary to Robert O'Con- 
nor, Manager, Labor Relations, is surrounded by CTA friends and 
co-workers from the Merchandise Mart who surprised her with a 
baby shower at the Merchandise Mart M&M Club last 
month.Seated next to the honoree is Ann Murphy-Gaughan, con- 



tract information representative for Labor Relations. Others are 
(from left) Linda Bremer, Evelyn Stewart, Jan Olson, Carol 
Fucaloro, Alice Dungan, Ginny McGraw, Marguerite Roth, Monica 
Loye, Judy Weier, Maureen Danaher, Barbara Parker, Nidia 
Rodriguez, Mary Ann Jagodzinski, and Mary Sue O'Connor. 



Thanks - for a 
job well done 



Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 



Isaac Beal, Washington Garage 
Arnold Beler, North Park 
Rosie Booth, North Avenue 
Francis Butts, Washington Garage 

Comdora Calhoun, North Park 
James Charlton, Special Services 
Quenton Clark, Washington 
Garage 

Wesley Cobbs, Washington Garage 
Mary Cobleigh, Near South 
Ronald Coleman, North Avenue 
Nancy Corral, Special Services 

Michael Doss, Washington Garage 

Thelbert Elders, North Avenue 
Ophelia Ellis. 77th Street 

Rosalio Garcia Jr., Near South 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Milan Gracanin, Archer 



John Harvey, 52nd Street 
James Hawthorne, Limits 
Booker Henry, Washington Garage 
Bobby Hobbs, Washington Garage 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 
Thomas Houston, Washington 
Garage 

Need Jackson, Special Services 
Willie James, North Park 

Robert Kain, Forest Glen 
Ruth Kocher, Special Services 

Tom Lenoir, Washington Garage 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Dominic Lochirco, Archer 

Howard Means, Washington 

Garage 

Carole Miranda, North Park 

Alvin Moore, Washington Garage 

Thomas Morrison, North Park 

Robert Owens, Washington Garage 

Walter Payne, 77th Street 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
John Perkins, Instruction 
Melvin Perry, Washington Garage 
Donald Phillips, 61st Street 



Robert Reed, Washington Garage 
Thomas Reilly, Far South 
James Robertson, Beverly 
Izaih Robinson Jr., North Park 
Willie Robinson, Washington 
Garage 

Edward Sanello, North Avenue 

L. Simpson, Lawndale 

William Stafford, Washington 

Garage 

Barbara Swoverland, Special Ser- 



Rudolph Tatum, Washington 
Garage 

Adolphe Vaughn, Washington 

Garage 

Amador Velez Sr., Washington 

Garage 

Joseph Wharton, 77th Street 

Herbert Williams, Near South 

James Wilson, Washington Garage 

Leonard Woolfolk, North Avenue 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



SEPTEMBER, 1982 



Special Services for honored visitor 




CTA Special Services provided door-to-door transportation ser- 
vice for Presidential Press Secretary James Brady when he visited 
Chicago last month. Isaac Beal, Superintendent, Special Ser- 
vices, operates lift as Operator Michael Doss assists Brady 
aboard the bus after picking him up at his hotel for the trip to 
Wrigley Field. At the Cubs' game, Brady was presented a bat 
signed by members of the Chicago Cubs. Making the presenta- 
tion was "Mr. Cub" himself, Ernie Banks, a former CTA Board 
member. 



G.E. presents original oil painting 




This original oil painting of a train of the South Side Rapid Transit 
Company, predecessor of the CTA, was presented to the CTA 
Board last month by George H. Bohn (left). Manager, General 
Electric Company Transit Equipment Marketing. Accepting for 
the CTA Is Board Vice Chairman James P. Gallagher. The 
painting, by noted transit Illustrator and former Saturday Evening 
Post artist John Gould, depicts Chicago's first elevated rail line, 
the "Alley L," on the occasion of the Introduction by General Elec- 
tric of a ma]or new concept In mass transportation - the world's 
first electric multiple unit transit train. The date was April 20, 
1B98. The painting was used originally In a nationally distributed 
General Electric advertising campaign which saluted Chicago on 
the Inauguration of the first multiple unit train service. Currently, 
the CTA Is accepting delivery of the new 2600 series rapid transit 
cars from The Budd Company containing General Electric propul- 
sion equipment. 



Maintenance employees 
honored for heroism 




Randy Simmons and Hayward Hughes of Facilities Maintenance 
receive accolades for their recent acts of heroism. The special 
recognition included a four of the Control Center in the Mer- 
chandise Mart. The group includes (from left) C. Len Wiksten, 
Director, Facilities Maintenance; Thomas L. Wolgemuth, 
Manager, Facilities Engineering; Simmons, and Hughes; James 
Blaa, Manager, Transportation, and Michael Lavelle, Director of 
Service. 

Manager of Facilities Engineering and Maintenance 
Thomas L. Wolgemuth presented certificates of special 
recognition to a carpenter and a rail janitor foreman for acts 
of heroism. 

Honored were Randy Simmons, a carpenter, and 
Hayward Hughes, of the Rail Janitor Group, both in the 
Facilities Maintenance Section. 

Simmons, working with a carpenter construction gang, 
came to the rescue of a co-worker who had fallen onto the 
third rail as workmen were renewing the footwalk in the area 
of 63rd and Halsted on the Englewood-Jackson Park 
branch of the North-South rapid transit line. 

Witnesses said Simmons was standing directly behind the 
man who lost his balance and fell. He grabbed the man im- 
mediately, pulling him away from the danger area, and 
began administering first aid. He continued to treat his co- 
worker until paramedics of the Chicago Fire Department ar- 
rived. The man subsequently returned to work in good 
health. 

Hughes was recognized for the assistance he rendered in 
the apprehension of a would-be pickpocket at the 
Madison/Wabash station. Hughes was waiting to board a 
train when a passenger boarding ahead of him caught a man 
making a stealthy attempt to put his hand into his pocket. 
Hughes assisted the conductor and the intended victim in 
detaining the man until police arrived. 

Witnesses said had it not been for Hughes' quick response 
to the situation, the pickpocket would have made good his 
attempt and escaped into the crowd. 

In addition to the certificates of special recognition, Sim- 
mons and Hughes were treated to a day of visiting with CTA 
Engineering and Maintenance management, including a 
tour of the Control Center, the Travel Information Center, 
and other facilities with Wolgemuth and Director of Facilities 
Maintenance C. Len Wiksten. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



In Memoriam 
Melvin Alexander 




Melvin Alexander, 60, News Writer and Production Assistant on the CTA 
Transit News Staff (Public Affairs/Consumer Services Department), died 
August 21 at his home in south suburban Dixmoor after an extended illness. 

Mr. Alexander joined the CTA September 1, 1955, as a bus operator from the 
52nd Street garage. He transferred to Keeler garage on December 4 of that year, 
and subsequently was assigned to the 69th Street garage where he served for 11 
years. 

He was named editorial assistant for the Transit News on August 6, 1967, in 
the Public Affairs Department in the Merchandise Mart. Early in his career as a 
writer, Mr. Alexander began reporting on CTA intramural sports and was well 
known among sports enthusiasts. 

An avid golfer, he was a member of a CTA golf foursome since 1980, which 
roamed courses at Carriage Greens in Darien, and Hickory Hills Country Club at 
95th Street each Saturday morning from April to November. He remained with 
the group until his health failed. He was also a participant for many years in golf 
outings sponsored by ATU Local 241, as well as the general office. 

He was an active member for nearly six years on the CTA Bowling Team which 
was a part of the City of Chicago Bureau of Engineers League. 

Mr. Alexander is survived by his wife, Florence; two sons, Edward and Eugene 
Alexander; three daughters, Karen and Lorna Alexander, and Mrs. Michele 
Freeman, former secretary to CTA Director of Contract Construction John 
Chura. He also leaves three stepsons, Charles, Keith, and Eric Childress; a foster 
son, Charlie Bryant; father, Edward M. Alexander Sr.; two brothers, Edward Jr. 
and Clarence, and nine grandchildren. 



For your benefit 

First Notice of Claim speeds medical processing 



One of the questions employees continually ask is why is 
it necessary to submit a First Notice of Claim and a new 
diagnosis each year for a long-standing physical condition. 
Travelers Insurance says it's necessary because at the end of 
each year, all previously submitted claims and supporting 
documents are sent to the Home Office in Hartford, Con- 
necticut. 

This means nothing remains in the employee's family 
folder to indicate the specific claims and the medical reports 
submitted to substantiate these claims for the previous year. 
For this reason, the employee is required to submit a new 
First Notice of Claim and a diagnosis at the beginning of 
each year for any illness or injury not job related. 

A separate claim notice and diagnosis must be provided 
for each member of the employee's family for each illness or 
injury that is not work related. (Injuries on duty are to be 



handled through Marten Boyer and Company or by con- 
tacting the CTA Worker's Compensation Section at 
664-7200, Extension 3621 or 3622.) 

When a First Notice of Claim and diagnosis is submitted 
on an employee's dependent who is working. Travelers is 
the secondary carrier. To make any payment towards the 
claim, a copy of the payments made by the primary carrier 
and a copy of the bills must be submitted to Travelers to 
determine what has been paid and what Travelers can pay 
through coordination of benefits provision. 

Finally, all bills submitted during a calendar year which 
are continuations of a previously submitted claim must have 
the employee's name and address, social security number, 
and be marked "CTA" on the bill for proper identification. 

If all of these recommendations are followed, claims will 
be handled quicker, and payments will be made rapidly. 



HMO opens 30-day enrollment 

CTA employees wishing to join one of the seven Health 
Maintenance Organizations may enroll during the month of 
October when the annual 30-day enrollment period is open. 

The seven HMO plans open for membership are Anchor, 
HAP, Maxicare/Intergroup, Michael Reese, Prucare, 
Union, and Chicago HMO. Enrollment packages are 
available at all work locations, and provide a comparison of 
benefits under HMOs and the present Comprehensive 
Medical Plan. Specific enrollment authorization cards are in- 
cluded in each package. 

An HMO provides health care on a prepayment basis with 
emphasis on comprehensive and preventive treatment. The 
plan offers complete care including specialist referrals, and 
laboratory and hospital services. Although an HMO does 



not provide dental service, the CTA employee choosing an 
HMO will not lose this benefit. Dental care is still provided as 
under the Travelers Comprehensive Medical Plan with the 
usual reimbursement procedures. 

The HMO program is an alternative to the Travelers 
Comprehensive Medical Plan and is strictly voluntary. The 
CTA will contribute the same amount toward any HMO 
plan for an employee as it does for the Travelers Com- 
prehensive Medical Plan. However, persons who wish to re- 
main with the comprehensive program are not obligated to 
change their health care plans. For additional information, 
employees should contact the Insurance Department on 
Ext. 3618. 



SEPTEMBER, 1982 



Kedzie garage construction is right on schedule 




The new Kedzie garage construction project has progressed from pile caps (left) to steel 
frame, and is scheduled for completion in t\/larch, 1984. 




This rising network of concrete columns and steel Is part of an interior double fire wall 
within the new facility being erected. 




This excavated site with Its sub-grade work will be the tank pad with a capacity to store 
100,000 gallons of diesel fuel. 



Construction of the new multi- 
million dollar Kedzie garage is on 
schedule according to CTA engineers. 
Slated for completion in March, 1984, 
the new garage is being erected on 
South Kedzie between Jackson 
Boulevard and Van Buren Street. 

Upon completion, Kedzie will be the 
first garage constructed to house all 
buses, thus meeting environmental 
and energy conservation standards. 
Engineers say reduced energy con- 
sumption will be characteristic of the 
new structure. 

In addition to buses being parked in- 
side the garage, all maintenance and 
other service functions of vehicles will 
also be contained inside, thus reducing 
noise and exhaust pollution levels in 
the immediate residential area. The in- 
door parking will also eliminate the 
need for idling of engines during 
winter months which will reduce fuel 
consumption. 

The garage will also be heated in 
winter via exhaust air channeled to a 
system which will extract heat and use 
it to preheat outside air brought into 
the building. 

The spacious facility, unlike any 
presently in use, will provide floor area 
nearly one and a half tmes the floor 
area of the seventh floor in the Mer- 
chandise Mart, where CTA general 
and executive offices are located. The 
garage is designed to accommodate 
250 vehicles and 650 personnel. 

To date, contractors have com- 
pleted nearly 60 per cent of the 
facility's steel erection, with the con- 
struction of the building's masonry 
walls currently in progress. 

Other activity at the new garage site 
includes the installation of the metal 
roof deck and major rooftop air handl- 
ing units. Plumbing lines, connection 
to street services, concrete water 
reclamation tanks, as well as hoist 
trenches and the inspection pits, have 
also been completed to various 
degrees. 

Upon completion, the new Kedzie 
garage will be a more comfortable 
facility with modern equipment for 
employees, which is expected to in- 
crease efficiency for both the 
Transportation and Equipment 
Engineering/ Maintenance Depart- 
ments. 

The new garage replaces the old 
Kedzie carhouse which was erected on 
the same site in 1910 and demolished 
during January-July, 1980, due to its 
obsolete facilities and structural 
deterioration. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Loop 'L' structure gets a new look 



The Loop 'L' structure is getting the 
Cinderella treatment. 

Its weather-worn colors of blue and 
white stations and gray structure are 
being replaced with a pleasing cream 
white color for both the stations and 
structure. 

The massive job of painting the 
Loop structure—running nine blocks 
long and five blocks wide--is being 
done by 27 painters working mostly 
from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., seven days a 
week. 

They are employed by the Midway 
Industrial Contractors, Inc., 1030 E. 
87th Street, and are expected to com- 
plete their work by Thanksgiving. 
They are expected to use 12,000 
gallons of paint. 

Midway is working on a contract of 
$1,437,250 let by the Chicago 
Department of Public Works. 

Nick Kavouris, Midway's vice presi- 
dent, said workmen are sandblasting 
portions of the Loop structure where it 
is needed to remove rust and old paint 
buildup. Some of the old paint buildup 
is nearly a sixteenth of an inch thick 
and represents many paintings since 
the structure was built in 1897. 

Besides the Loop 'L', the painters 
will work on short sections of tracks 
connected with the Loop structure. 

The painters are applying three 
coats of paint, Kavouris said. 

First, they apply a red-colored 
primer of modified vinyl alkyd rust in- 
hibitor. This is followed by an epoxy 
polyamide intermediate flat white 
coat, then the shiny top coat of cream 
white of aliphatic acryllic polyurethane 
paint. 



Top: Support beam of Loop 'L' shows 
sand blasted work in preparation for tfiree 
coats of paint. View is south on Wells 
Street near Adams Street. 



Center Bright cream white top coat of 
paint lightens 'L' structure on Wells, look- 
ing south from Randolph Street. 



Bottom: New paint job brightens 
superstructure on west side of Welis, just 
south of Lake Street. 




SEPTEMBER. 1982 



ZAP Awards 



Rail Maintenance employees at Des 
Plaines-Foster shops took the Zero Ac- 
cident Program literally as they com- 
pleted the second quarter of 1982 with 
no injuries at all - the only terminal 
facility to achieve a perfect record dur- 
ing the period. 

Meanwhile. 61st-Racine crews had 
the lowest accident frequency rate 
among rail terminal shops, allowing 
them to qualify for first-place honors 
for the sixth quarter in a row. 

A repeat performance was also 
staged by Beverly, which has taken 
first place among bus garages during 
each of the first two quarters this year. 
Beverly reported only one injury 
among its employees during the 
period ending June 30. 

At Bus Shops, six of 18 work areas 
came through the quarter without a 
single injury; Upholstery, Machine, 
Radiator and Print Shops, as well as 
Mechanical and Utility. Upholstery 
and Print Shop workers have now 
gone four consecutive quarters injury- 
free. 

Another enviable record is being 
built at Skokie Shop, where eight of 
13 work areas completed the second 
quarter with no recorded injuries. 
Among these were Carpenter, 
Machine and Axle Shops, Shop Ser- 
vice and Blacksmith/Welding. The 
others -- Paint Shop, Armature Room 
and Degreasing -- made this quarter 
their third in a row without an injury. 



Smiling faces tell the story at Desplaines 
terminal shop, where maintenance crew 
led by Chuck Myers (kneeling left), Assist- 
ant Day Foreman, won ZAP award for 
injury-free second quarter. 



Bob Ready (at microphone), Safety 
Specialist, Maintenance, was one of 
several speakers who congratulated 
crews at Beverly garage for winning first- 
place ZAP award for the second quarter in 
a row. 



Joe PratI (center). Acting Foreman, 
Machine Shop, displays ZAP award won 
by fellow machinists at Bus Shop, where 
five other areas also earned first-place 
honors. 




10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Bob Buerger (second from left), Foreman, Carpenter Shop, ac- 
cepts ZAP award from George Wylie, Acting Unit Supervisor, Vehi- 
cle Overhaul, at Skokie presentation ceremony attended by Bill 
Crocker (left), Unit Supervisor, Unit Overhaul, and Frank Venezia, 
Director, Rail Maintenance. 



Unit Supervisor Henry Dickerson (wearing tie) shares another ZAP 
award spotlight at 61st-Racine shop with (left to right) Car Ser- 
vicers Clyde Miller and Sam Siggers, and Car Repairers Frank 
Steen, Virgil Lindsey and Tom Lally. 



New rules on pensioner withholdings 



The Tax Equity and Fiscal Respon- 
sibility Act of 1982 recently passed by 
Congress and signed into law by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan has certain provi- 
sions concerning the withholding of 
federal taxes on pension payments. 
The key provisions of the Act are as 
follows: 

'Unless a pensioner elects not to 
withhold taxes, the Retirement Plan 
for CTA Employees will be required to 
withhold taxes on all pension 
payments made after January 1, 
1983. However, no withholding is re- 
quired on the payout of nontaxable 
employee contributions. 

'The procedure for withholding is 
basically to use the number of exemp- 
tions indicated on an exemption cer- 
tificate. If a pensioner fails to submit an 
exemption certificate, he or she will be 
treated as being married and claiming 
three exemptions. For the taxable por- 
tion of lump sum distributions-i.e. the 



accrued interest on refunded 
employee contributions-the Internal 
Revenue Service will develop special 
tax tables. 

'Each Plan arrangement of an 
employee is treated separately. 
Therefore, there will be no coordina- 
tion required between other CTA 
departments, such as the CTA De- 
ferred Compensation Plan and the 
Retirement Plan. 

'The Retirement Plan will give 
notification of a pensioner's election 
not to have withholdings: 

-The notice of election must be 
made not earlier than six months 
before the first payment and not 
later than the date of the first 
payment. 

-An annual notice will be mailed 
to the pensioners advising them of 
their right to change the election. 

-With a lump sum distribution, 
the election must be made no later 



than the date of distribution. 

'If, for some reason, insufficient 
withholding or withholdings are made 
prior to July 1, 1983, the Retirement 
Plan may withhold from subsequent 
pension payments the amount needed 
to satisfy the pre-July, 1983 re- 
quirements. 

Presently, the Pensions Section is 
waiting to see if the Internal Revenue 
Service will issue a form for this pro- 
cedure. 

We are also developing a mailing list 
of all retired employees who will 
receive taxable pension payments in 
1983. Normally, a retired employee 
will have received nontaxable con- 
tributions back in the form of monthly 
payments within a two or three year 
period from the date of retirement. 

For additional information contact 
the Pension Section at 929-5750. 



SEPTEMBER, 1982 







Henry V. Nelson, a CTA retiree, dons his American Legion liat to 
take on volunteer work at tlie Veterans l-lospital in Tampa, Fla. 
where he has amassed more than 1,000 hours of service. The 
former Lawndale motorman was recently the recipient of special 
recognition for meritorious community service from the Veterans 
Hospital and the American Legion. Nelson joined the Chicago 
Surface Lines January 21, 1929, and retired December 1, 1966. He 
is shown in this 1937 photo at right (without jacket) with his con- 
ductor, the late John Mondike. 




Richard Cacini, an instructor at the Maintenance Training Center, 
Lawndale, was promoted to captain in the U.S. Army Reserve. His 
new rank was pinned by his father, Capt. James Cacini, U.S. Army 
retired. The captain's bars were ones worn by the elder Cacini dur- 
ing the Korean Conflict. Present for the promotion ceremony is 
Cacini's wife, Mrs. Marion Lee Cacini, and Major Joe Johnson, 
commanding officer. The newly promoted Captain Cacini is com- 
mander of D Troop, 3/85 Cavalry, U.S. Army Reserve in Arlington 
Heights. 




Joe Lazzara and his wife, Marlene, pose proudly on Marlene's 
graduation day. She received a masters degree in library science 
from Rosary College last month. Joe Lazzara is superintendent of 
Grant Administration, Capital Development. 



A Rider Speaks Out 



Mr. M. Cardilli: 

Please excuse this letter for not being more formal; 
however, my time is limited and I did want to get this 
letter to you with a few points of interest. 

I live and work in Chicago and have been a CTA 
rider for many years, so my comments are first-hand. 
Generally, I really feel that the CTA is doing an ex- 
cellent job of "People moving people." I think the 
system serves many people over a large area for a 
nominal cost. It seems that the news media and the 
CTA riders are always down on the CTA for one thing 
or another and I would like to tell it how it is. 

Fares: Everyone complains about the cost, but for 
the miles you can travel, it must be considered a 
bargain. How else would the "masses" get to work? 

Not enough buses: Not enough room on buses is 
almost always a complaint. I think the real problem 
here is the fault of the riders themselves. For some 
strange reason, the majority of "some people" refuse 
to move to the rear of the bus allowing additional 
passengers to board. This is a major problem on prob- 
ably all routes. It is not a CTA-related problem and is 
very difficult to control. Suggestions: To ease the 
"people moving to the rear" problem, maybe CTA 
could initiate on some routes an "exit at the rear only" 
concept as a test pilot. 

Service: I really feel the people get excellent service 
and are spoiled. No suburbs are served any better than 
Chicago with buses or trains. 

I know the CTA is probably blamed for the condi- 
tion of the buses every day and yet, who cuts up the 
seats, breaks the windows, throws garbage all over the 
bus, tears off roof vents, smokes and drinks and sup- 
plies all of the beautiful graffiti??? The people who ride 
the CTA! 

My brother is employed by the CTA (South garage) , 
and I know he takes pride in his job and responsibilities 
to keep the buses running. He taught me the "People 
moving people" slogan, and it would work even better 
if only the people would help. 

It seems as if no one ever says anything good about 
the CTA. I think it's great, it works, and I'd hate to live 
and work in Chicago without it! 

Ideas for improvement: 

1. Seal up the "leaks" in and around windows and 
roof for those rainy days. 

2. Provide some type of ventilation for those buses 
that have non-working A/C. Sealed up on a hot 
day without air or vents is bad! 

You and the CTA are doing a fine job. 

Joseph Walter 
Chicago 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Public Safety Awards 



Public Safety Awards for the second 
quarter of 1982 went to Forest Glen 
garage and Jefferson Park terminal. It 
was the second straight PSA for Forest 
Glen and the 12th time the garage's 
employees have won the award since 
its inception in 1961. 

The north side garage won the 
award with a traffic rate of 3.35 
(100,000 miles) during the quarter, a 
35 per cent better rate than the entire 
bus system rate of 5.16. 

Forest Glen experienced a 
passenger rate of 0.95. In other 
words, for every 100,000 miles of 
operation, the garage was involved in 
one accident. This rate was 18 per 
cent better than the bus system rate of 



1.16 (100,000 miles). Forest Glen 
had 30 accident-free days during the 
second quarter. 

During this year's second quarter, 
Jefferson Park was involved in one aC' 
cident, giving it the PSA. This was the 
15th time Jefferson Park (formerly 
Logan Square) won the award. 

Jefferson Park won with a com- 
bined traffic and passenger frequency 
rate of 0.067 (100,000 car miles). 
This rate was 85 per cent lower than 
the rail system rate. In other words, 
Jefferson Park had one accident for 
every IV2 million miles of operation 
during the second quarter. It also had 
90 accident-free days during that 
period. 




Forest Glen garage employees gattier to see their garage win the second Public Safety 
Award in a row In Informal ceremonies In the north side facility's train room. Supervisory 
and Safety Department personnel attended the program. Forest Glen won the award for 
the second quarter, 1982 competition. 




Gathered for a "family" portrait are some members of the Jefferson Park terminal, winner 
of the Public Safety Award for the second quarter, 1982. Joining operating crews are 
members of the Transportation and Safety Departments. 



Law for today 

Q. My wife and I have sold our 
home for several thousand 
dollars more than we paid for 
it. My wife is 65 and I am 60. 
Will we have to pay a tax on 
the capital gain? 

A. A capital gain tax is the tax paid on 
your net profit derived after im- 
provements and such things as 
legal expenses are deducted. This 
tax can be deferred if, within a cer- 
tain time period, you purchase 
another residence costing at least 
as much or more than the home 
you just sold. Under a law which 
became effective in 1978, tax- 
payers 55 years or older can take a 
one time only exclusion of up to 
$100,000 of profit on a home sale 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. is there any law that requires a 
landlord to return a tenant's 
security deposit within a cer- 
tain amount of time? 

A. Yes. A landlord of real property 
containing 10 or more units must 
return any security deposit re- 
ceived within 45 days of the date 
the tenant vacates the premises. 
Failure to return the deposit as well 
as failure to supply the tenant with 
an itemized statement of damage 
and repair costs could subject the 
landlord to liability for an amount 
twice the security deposit, plus 
court costs and attorney's fees. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. How long must a couple wait 
to be married after receiving a 
marriage license from the 
county clerk's office? 

A. The law provides that a couple 
need only wait one day for the re- 
quired ceremony instead of the 
previous law which required a 
three day waiting period. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. My lease says I can sublease 
my apartment and I have 
located a person who wants to 
sublet. Can my landlord refuse 
to allow me to sublease? 

A. Yes. Even though the lease allows 
you to sublet, the landlord need 
not accept an unsuitable tenant. 
However, the landlord may not be 
unreasonable in refusing to accept 
subtenants. 

- • Illinois State Bar Association 
Subnnit questions to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 

Illinois Bar Center 

Springfield. IL 62701 
(Answers may appear in columns. 
Personal answers not possible.) 



SEPTEMBER, 1982 



13 



Weekends are made for educating 




Jan Olson 



Virginia IVIcGraw 



Earning a college degree is the 
dream of a lifetime for some people, 
especially if their pursuit of education 
was ever interrupted. 

Many CTA employees have re- 
turned to the classroom at night, but 
find it a tough proposition as they 
strive to cope with job, family, the 
academic world, and a garden variety 
of other obligations which may con- 
front them in any given day. At best, 
attendance at night classes becomes a 
greater challenge than academics. 

Four very determined CTA general 
office employees have found a better 
way to deal with the simultaneous pur- 
suits of diploma and paycheck. They 
are participating in Mundelein 
College's Weekend College in 
Residence program - - college educa- 
tion's "better mouse trap." 

Working toward baccalaureate 
degrees in business are Linda Bremer, 
Secretary to the Administrative Joint 
Commission; Ann Murphy-Gaughan, 
Contract Information Representative, 
Labor Relations Department, and 
Virginia McGraw, Executive 
Secretary, General Operations Divi- 
sion. Jan Olson, Secretarial 
Stenographer 1, Law Department, is 
working towards a liberal arts degree 
with a business minor. 

The Weekend in Residence pro- 
gram puts its students through three- 
and-one-half hour classes Friday night 
and all day Saturday and Sunday. 

A highly-concentrated program is 
offered to men and women who wish 
to attend college and earn a degree 
while working full time during the 
week. Mundelein is located on Lake 
Michigan's shoreline on Chicago's far 
north side. 

Linda Bremer, a sophomore major- 
ing in business administration, said the 
program is convenient for her. "Even 
though I have close to an hour's drive 
to get to Mundelein* 1 appreciate it 
much more than rushing to a class 
after leaving work. I like the comfor- 
table surroundings, which includes the 
students and the small classes. 





Ann Murphy- Linda Bremer 

Gaughan 

Everyone is in the same boat, either 
returning to school after many years, 
or getting a late start, so no one is try- 
ing to show anyone else up," said 
Bremer, who plans to specialize in 
public administration. 

Jan Olson said, "I find it easier to at- 
tend classes on the weekend because I 
am on my own time, and I'm fresher 
when I can begin classes early. I find it 
easier to organize and budget my time 
because I don't have to worry about 
getting to class from work." 

Olson, also a sophomore, said this 
new approach to a college degree 
gives her enough time to take care of 
other obligations since she does have 
some free time during weekends. 

When the job sometimes requires 
an employee like Mundelein freshman 
Ann Murphy-Gaughan to stay beyond 
what is the normal quitting time for 
most people, the Weekend College in 
Residence becomes the perfect alter- 
native to night classes. There is no 
need to rush for the campus not know- 
ing if you'll make it on time. 

"I never really know when I'm going 
to be through at work," said Murphy- 
Gaughan, "so it always made it dif- 
ficult to go to school at night. Besides, 
I always thought about going to 
Mundelein, and now I live only four 
blocks away, so it's very convenient." 

Virginia McGraw, another 
sophomore, called the weekend pro- 
gram an excellent opportunity for the 
mature student. "All of the people in 
this program are highly motivated to 
succeed, and the cooperation between 
the college and the student is the 
best," said McGraw. 

Jane McGuan, Sales Coordinator, 
Group Sales Section, Treasury 
Department, an alumnus of the 
Weekend College in Residence pro- 
gram, said the program demands a lot 
from its students, but gives a lot in 
return. "The class size is so small you 
feel tutored," said McGuan, who 
spent five years in the program. She 
graduated in 1981 with a degree in 
business management. 



Controller's son scores 
academic excellence 




Kenneth F. Evans, 13, son of 
Lampton Evans, Superintendent, 
Rail/Bus Personnel, Contt-oller II, 
completed an accelerated academic 
summer program at Loyola Academy 
in Wilmette with academic excellence. 
The six-week program covers a full 
school year of mathematics and 
English with classes conducted four 
hours each day in the two subjects. 
Evans, a 1982 graduate of St. 
Dorothy Catholic school, earned an A 
in both subjects at Loyola and had a 
composite score of 99 per cent on the 
St. Ignatius High school entrance ex- 
amination, the highest attainable 
score. 

Upon graduating with honors from 
St. Dorothy, he was accepted as a 
Link candidate, a special organization 
founded by Father Swade of Ignatius, 
and designed to motivate bright ethnic 
students to their fullest potential. 

While in elementary school, Evans 
made outstanding achievements in 
mathematics, social studies and 
science for which he received merit 
awards. The youth scored in the upper 
five percenttle of academic tests ad- 
ministered annually to students 
attending Chicago elementary 
schools. 

His scores qualified him to par- 
ticipate in a city-wide talent search 
sponsored by the Chicago public 
schools and the Gifted Program sec- 
tion of the Illinois State Board of 
Education. The project represents a 
systematic attempt to identify students 
at the upper elementary level who 
show exceptional ability in 
mathematics and language arts. These 
students are given an opportunity to 
take additional tests which more ac- 
curately measure their math and ver- 
bal skills. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 



ANDREW BUTLER, Operator, 

77th Street. Emp. 9-11-51 
CHARLES HENDERSON, Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 3-11-57 
ALOYSIUS KOLMAN, Tinner, 

West Shops, Emp. 7-22-47 
RAYMOND LEONHART, Bus Repairer, 

North Park, Emp. 5-9-47 
EDWARD REASON, Operator, 

52nd Street, Emp. 7-31-51 
MARGARET ROCHE, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 4-18-52 
GLENN ROSS, Trvlg. Mtrl. Handler, 

South Shops. Emp. 9-4-51 



HARRY BROWN, Operator. 

Beverly, Emp. 11-5-56 
WILLA HAYWOOD. Comb. Clerk, 

Howard, Emp 4-29-70 
CLIFFORD JACOBS. Serv. Trk. Chauff. 

West Shops, Emp. 10-22-43 
SIMON JONES, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 4-3-67 
JOSEPH MAREK, Engine Blower, 

North Park, Emp. 9-11-50 
EDWARD RIVERS, Collector. 

Archer, Emp 1-28-57 



itnT iva:E]vroR.iA.iva: 

MELVIN ALEXANDER. 60, Pub. Aff./ 

Cons. Svcs., Emp. 9-1-55, Died 8-21-82 
GUSTAV BERGSTROM, 91, 52nd Street, 

Emp. 3-7-24, Died 6-29-82 
FRANK BUGLIO, 74, North Park, 

Emp. 10-1-47. Died 7-10-82 
DAVID CLARK. 78. Kedzie. 

Emp. 3-29-27. Died 7-3-82 
MICHAEL CONROY. 81. Kedzie. 

Emp. 5-29-36. Died 7-2-82 
ALBERTA DAVIS. 74. South Section. 

Emp. 5-21-69. Died 7-3-82 
THOMAS DeCANTlLLON. 68. North Park. 

Emp. 6-5-46. Died 7-4-82 
GUY DiMEO. 71. Kedzie. 

Emp. 11-4-42. Died 7-23-82 



HUBERT DOLL. 74. West Section. 

Emp. 10-25-33. Died 7-11-82 
A. Z GARVIN. 66. Beverly. 

Emp. 5-3-51. Died 7-18-82 
ROBERT HOWSON. 79. Limits. 

Emp, 2-10-43. Died 7-27-82 
ROBERT JEROZAL, 65. West Shops. 

Emp. 2-4-48. Died 7-24-82 
OTTO KOPCHYNSKA. 85. North Section. 

Emp. 6-18-18. Died 7-2-82 
EDWARD KUKLEWICZ. 60. Forest Glen. 

Emp 10-16-41. Died 7-25-82 
PAUL LAKICH, 67. Linden. 

Emp. 4-3-53. Died 7-10-82 
GEORGE LAPHAM. 81. 69th Street. 

Emp. 8-1-23. Died 7 3-82 
JOHN LAZZARO. 68. Plant Maint.. 

Emp. 5-19-47, Died 7-7-82 



HERBERT MATTHES, 69, Archer. 

Emp 6-26-41. Died 7-23-82 
NESBIT MURDEN. 60. 77th Street, 

Emp, 2-24-48. Died 7-4-82 
LESTER NELAND. 74. North Park. 

Emp. 2-24-34. Died 7-13-82 
TIMOTHY O'CONNOR. 31. Plant Maint. 

Emp, 10-12-71. Died 8-22-82 
EDWARD O'ROURKE. 62. Sales. 

Emp 6-25-51. Died 7-31-82 
MAURICE POWE. 62. Maintenance. 

Emp. 5-26-55. Died 7-8-82 
BESSIE RENTFRO. 92. South Section. 

Emp. 5-1-46. Died 7-8-82 
JOHN SCHULTZ. 61. Plant Maint.. 

Emp. 10-19-60, Died 8-11-82 
MICHAEL TOBIN, 67, Assign Office. 

Emp 5-15-46. Died 7-22-82 



Service anniversaries in September 
40 years 35 years 

Edward Adamowski, Treasury 
John Angel. Electrical 
Edward Augustine. South Shops 
William Beckmann, Maintenance 
Ralph Brindlse. Forest Glen 
Bert Cadney, Photographic 
Leonard Dake, 69th Street 
Raymond Dobbertin, Maint Tng Ctr 
Pierino Mannarelli. 69th Street 
William Park. Electrical 
Edward Stack. Archer 
Peter Szatkowski, Electrical 
Anthony Ukockis. Archer 
James Ward. Limits 




Stanley Janasek 

South Shops 
Norbert Gewelke 

Utility 



30 years 



Paul Alexander Jr.. 69th Street 
Burton Bosan. Public Affairs/Cons Srvcs 
Adelbert Cobb. Ashland/95th 
Anthony Cychner. North Avenue 
William Daniels. South Section 
Rudolph Dillon. Rail North 
Charles Holley. Beverly 
Joseph Johnson, Ashland '95th 



Henry Kania. South Shops 
Robert Levine. Ashland/95th 
Herman Louisville. Ashland/95th 
David Shepherd. Ashland/95th 
Merlin Washack, South Shops 



25 years 



S. L. Brooks. Track 
Ulysses Buck, Archer 
Robert demons. Lawndale 
Dewitt Coleman. Archer 
Bernard Fay. District C 
Lenard Gilbert Jr.. Central District 
Lura Henderson. Archer 
Charles Hicks, North Avenue 
Thomas Hughes. Control Center 
Tom Lenoir. Washington 
David Maiden. South Shops 
Henry Mosley. Utility 
Christopher O'Brien. Maintenance 
Donald Pruitt, North Avenue 
Percy Riddlck. 77th Street 
William Riley. 77th Street 
Gene Ross. Consumer Services 
Robert Ross Jr., South Shops 
Mitchell Thornton Jr.. Utility 
Joe Trotter. 77lh Street 
Virgil Tyler. Maintenance 
Archibold Valentine. North Avenue 



SEPTEMBER, 1982 



Ticket Agents Please Note 



] 



In order to make Transit News more readily available for 
ticket agents near their work locations, ticket agents may 
now pick up their copies of Transit News at either the 
Central Assignment Office or at one of our Rail Ter- 
minals. 



The quantity of Transit News issues sent to Central 
Assignment has been drastically reduced, and the quantity 
sent to the Rail Terminals has been increased for this pur- 
pose. 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



OLD ADDRESS - 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box . 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mall to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merchandise Mart, Chicago, IL 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 35 NummberS 

Published for employees and retirees of the CTA by 
the External Affairs Division, Michael N. Horowitz. 
Manager. 

Editorial and graphics by the Public Affair Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editorial Assistant: Ricl< Willis 
Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Sen/ices Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza. p.O. Box 3555, Chicago. Il- 
linois 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO, ILU, 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIA^^ ' TN 

Govt. Publications Department- 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 



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Major transit changes 
proposed for 
southwest side 



Rapid transit service for the southwest side of Chicago 
could open as early as the latter part of 1988 if funds are 
available, according to a recent Southwest Side Transit Cor- 
ridor study. Presently, it is the only area of the city without 
'L' service. 

Governor James Thompson announced on October 11 
that the federal government had released $9 million for 
engineering work on the proposed southwest side 'L' line, 
contingent upon federal approval of the city's environmental 
studies of the affected area. Final approval on the money is 
expected early next year. 

The southwest side transit corridor will stretch from the 
Loop to Midway airport, and will cost an estimated $453 
million. It will be the first entirely new transit line to be built 
by Chicago since 1969 when the Dan Ryan 'L' route was 
opened. 

Funding for the route is expected to come from the In- 
terstate Transfer Fund held by the U.S. Department of 
Transportation. This fund, totaling $2 billion, had previously 
been committed to the construction of the Crosstown ex- 
pressway. 



'ieK 



Southwest rail alternatives 



'(^•X\ 



Governor Thompson and Mayor Jane Byrne agreed to 

r>X-Scrap the much opposed expressway two years ago, and to 

use the fund for a variety of highway projects and rapid 

transit improvements in the Chicago area. The federal 

government concurred. 

Christopher L. Krueger, transportation planner for the 
Chicago Department of Public Works, was project chairman 
of the 38-member study group which completed the lion's 
share of the southwest side corridor proposal in 11 months, 
the fastest completion of a study of this magnitude ever 
reported. 

The study group represents six governmental agencies, 
including the Chicago Transit Authority, and five consulting 
firms. CTA staff members, all from the Operations Planning 
Department, include principal planner Jon Roth, CTA pro- 
ject manager; planners John Gaul, Kathleen Hermann, and 
Mary Kay Christopher. Other staff members from the 
Operations Planning and Engineering Departments also 
assisted in the study. 

(continued on page 2) 




TRANSIT NEW 



FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

NOVEMBER, 1982 



Geissenheimer heads 
San Francisco MUNI 

CTA General Operations Manager Harold H. 
Geissenheimer has been named General Manager of the 
San Francisco Municipal Railway. He was appointed to the 
post in mid-September by San Francisco Mayor Diane 
Feinstein. 

Geissenheimer leaves CTA after a six and a half year 
tenure which was occassionally punctuated with critical 
situations requiring crisis management to insure that efficient 
service to the riding public would be maintained. Such 
events include the January 4, 1978, discovery of a cracked 
steel box bent at 18th and Clark streets. Service on the Dan 
Ryan rapid transit was interrupted for 11 days while 
engineers made repairs, but shuttle service to the Loop was 
provided for Dan Ryan riders. 

Other memorable challenges include the bitter winters of 
1978-79 which caused unmitigated strain on equipment, 
service disruption, and difficulty for CTA riders. 

The period of progress which brought Geissenheimer to 
CTA saw many transit developments in the Loop. Among 
them was the opening of State Street Mall, a new entrance 
to the subway as well as escalators, and shelters, and the 
establishment of contra flow bus lanes. It was also during this 
period that the articulated high capacity bus was introduced 



to the riding public. 

A particularly important development at CTA during the 
Geissenheimer years, one that was a matter of personal 
concern to the General Operations Manager, was the 
development of the CTA Special Services for the disabled 
and the purchase of 40 buses for the service. This included 
the development of a new bus through minority vendor 
Danny Lawson of Houston, and the Carpenter firm based in 
Indiana. The Washington garage was also opened to ac- 
commodate Special Services. 

Mayor Feinstein said she checked personally with Mayor 
Jane Byrne who said she hated to lose Geissenheimer 
"---because he's absolutely top notch." Mayor Byrne said 
she tried to talk him out of leaving Chicago, but realized it 
was time for him to become chief executive of an entire 
system. 

Geissenheimer said, "The strength of CTA is in the peo- 
ple who work here. There is no place in the nation with 
more dedication or professionalism. I will miss the people 
and the City of Chicago, but I look forward to new 
challenges in the City by the Bay." 

The former General Operations Manager has been a 
strong supporter of CTA's participation with the American 
Public Transit Association. He is chairman of APTA's Stan- 
dardization Committee, a member of the Rail Committee, 
past chairman of the Bus Operations Committee, and the 
international Union of Public Transport which is head- 
quartered in Brussels, Belgium. 



Southwest transit 

(continued from page 1) 

CTA representatives made detail studies of the final 12 
alternatives which ranged from maintaining the present 
buses-only service to improved signalization on Archer 
avenue, creation of exclusive busways and seven different 
rapid transit routes. 




Jon Roth (seated) discusses proposal for a southwest side transit 
corridor with CTA planners (from left) Mary Kay Christopher, John 
Gaul, and Kathy Hermann. Service to the area could begin within 
the next six years. 



CTA staff members worked with consultants in the design 
and development of busways and rapid transit alternatives 
and had the responsibility for the development of operating 
plans and operating cost estimates for each of the 12 alter- 
natives. 

They also created plans for restructuring the corridor's bus 
network for each of the alternatives and made an analysis of 
the number of buses, 'L' cars and other equipment needed 
to operate each of the 12 alternatives. 

Besides CTA personnel, members of the study group in- 
cluded members of the Chicago Department of Public 
Works, the Urban Mass Transportation Administration, Il- 
linois Department of Transportation, Regional Transporta- 
tion Authority, and the Chicago Area Transportation Study. 

The group began work in the fall of 1981. Its first report, a 
preliminary draft which tipped the scales at two pounds 
IS'A ounces, was issued in August, 1982. This was fol- 
lowed by a second report, some two pounds, three ounces 
of material, issued in September. 

"At the present time," Roth said, "the southwest corridor 
has 32 bus routes having a total of 696 buses operating dur- 
ing rush periods. We had examined data from similar 
transportation corridors from throughout the United States 
and our figures indicate this is the largest buses-only corridor 
(mainly on the Stevenson expressway and Archer avenue) 
in the nation. 

"The construction of a southwest rapid transit route, if ap- 
proved, would replace the express bus routes on the 
Stevenson, and considerably lessen the number of buses 
now in the southwest corridor," Roth said. 

Elimination of many CTA buses in the southwest corridor 
would be an obvious benefit to local and through traffic in 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli (left) extends best wishes to 
General Operations Manager Harold Geissenheimer who was 
named General Manager of the San Francisco Municipal Railway. 



the area and free those buses for service throughout the bus 
system. 

Most representatives of 20 neighborhoods stretching from 
the Loop to the far southwest side told committee re- 
searchers that of the seven proposed rapid transit routes 
cited in the first report, they favored the elevated route 
designated the 49th street-Midway airport-alignment. 

Interestingly, construction of any one of the seven pro- 
posed routes would have displaced from 13 to 41 
businesses and from three to eight residential buildings, 
small figures, considering the scope and size of the project. 
The small displacement figures are due to the planned use 
of existing railroad rights of way and city streets. 

If the 49th street-Midway airport-alignment is selected, 
the study group said the following data will prevail: Cost 
(1981 dollars) - - $453 million; Gross operation and 
maintenance costs - - $117 million; Daily auto users 
diverted to transit (total trips) - - 28,400; Daily ridership (by 
the year 2000) - - 118,760. 

If chosen, this proposed route would connect to the 
present North-South 'L' line structure at 18th street. It would 
have stations at Roosevelt Road and State street, Halsted 
street, just north of Archer avenue; Ashland avenue, just 
north of Archer; Western avenue at Archer; along 49th 
street at Western and at California and Kedzie avenues; 
Pulaski road, just south of Archer, and at Cicero avenue 
and 57th street, the route's terminal for Midway airport. 

There are plans to eventually extend this proposed route 
south to the Ford City shopping center on Cicero at 76th 
street. 



From the 
Chairman 



In the 
Holiday Spirit 



As we approach the holiday season, I would like to take 
this opportunity to thank each and every one of you for your 
enthusiastic support of the progressive programs that have 
been instituted at CTA since 1 became Chairman on 
February 19. And, on behalf of the entire CTA Board, I 
wish each of you and your families a most joyous and boun- 
tiful holiday season. 

During times of adversity, the true character of CTA 
employees becomes apparent. One of the finest examples 
of our character was the service provided during the recent 
commuter rail strike, which resulted in praise from many in- 
dividual riders and the Chicago media. 

During the past year, we have managed to keep our 
budget under control by providing excellent transit service 
and avoiding unnecessary expenses. Your diligent efforts in 
support of our "Ban the Buck" program, during the few 
weeks following the announcement of each campaign, pro- 
vided temporary relief from the unnecessary expense of 
counting dollar bills. But the increase in dollar bills collected 
at the fare box during subsequent weeks continues to be a 
serious problem, and it indicates the need for constant 
vigilance in this area. I therefore direct every bus operator to 
remind every rider who uses a dollar bill of the seriousness 
of this problem, and I direct all supervisory personnel to in- 
sure adherence to this directive. 

As we approach the holiday season, we must keep in 
mind that we are also approaching the most difficult season 
for public transportation. Soon we will be faced with the 
Christmas shopping rush. You all will encounter many 
riders who do not ride transit every day and may not be 
familiar with our system and operating rules. You must ex- 
tend to these riders your full cooperation and every possible 
courtesy, in order to make their riding experiences more 
pleasant and their holiday season more enjoyable. 

We will also encounter another Chicago winter, and I am 
sure that we all hope it will not be too severe. While the 
winter will certainly present additional challenges to 
operating and maintenance personnel and some inconve- 
nience to our riders, your courtesy, cooperation, and 
understanding will help make the winter season in Chicago 
more bearable for everyone. 

Once again, thank you for your support during the past 
year, and may your holiday season be filled with every hap- 
piness and benefit that you desire. 



>^2«.^S<I 



NOVEMBER, 1982 



Special Services 
receives first 
Carpenter bus, 
hosts peer group 



While CTA Special Services 
celebrated its first year of service to 
Chicagoans of limited mobility on 
September 21, the delivery of 20 new 
buses to Washington garage was 
underway. 

The additional buses will accom- 
modate 20 riders each, including four 
wheelchairs. Completion of delivery, 
expected in February 1983, will bring 
the total Special Services fleet to 42 
buses including two retrofitted Flxible 
buses used for fast link service. 

Low bidder on this project was the 
Lawson National Distributing Com- 
pany of Houston, Tex. The bid was for 
$2,172,000 for the 20 buses, in- 
cluding spare parts. Unit price per bus 
is $105,998. 

This is the first time in the history of 
any major transit agency that vehicle 
delivery was contracted for by a 
minority firm. 

Ceirpenter Body Works, Inc., of 
North Vernon, Ind., is fabricating the 
bus bodies under contract to Lawson. 

"The CTA is proud of this special 
service that we are providing for the 
disabled," said CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli. "Now, 8,000 trips 
are taken each month and we are still 
growing. In October of last year, the 
first full month of service, only 2,800 
trips were made. With the 20 addi- 
tional buses being delivered, we will be 
able to better satisfy demands for the 
service. At present, because we do not 
have enough equipment, we regretful- 
ly must turn down requests for trips or 
else place names on waiting lists." 

Four thousand persons are certified 
to ride the special door-to-door ser- 
vice. For information on requirements 
for certification, riders may call 
664-7200, Extension 3394. 

After being certified, the person calls 
525-1700 to make a reservation for 
the desired trip. 

The special service is provided Mon- 
day through Friday from 6:30 a.m. to 




The first of 20 additional lift-equipped buses (above) for the Chicago Transit Authority's 
Special Services was unveiled Oct. 15. Taking part in the ceremony (below) were CTA 
Chairman Michael Cardilli; Danny Lawson, President of Lawson Distributing Company, 
the low bidder for the purchase of the buses; Isaac Beat, Superintendent of the CTA 
Special Services; Joel Ettinger, Regional Administrator of the Urban Mass Transportation 
Administration, and Nick Ruggiero, CTA Board Member. 




9:30 p.m. and weekends and holidays 
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The fare is 90 cents and 10 cents for 
a transfer. 

The new buses are 30 feet long, 
eight feed wide, have 16 fixed seats 
and four foldable seats to make room 
for four wheelchair positions. A fifth 
wheelchair position is in front of the 
lounge seat at the rear of the bus. 

The buses have air conditioning and 
heating systems plus passenger win- 
dows that can be opened. There also 
is a ceiling vent in each bus. 

The front door of this special model 



bus is equipped with an electric- 
hydraulic wheelchair lift. The five 
wheelchair positions will have two in- 
dependent sets of restraints to accom- 
modate all types of wheelchairs. 

The CTA will equip each of the new 
buses with a two-way radio for com- 
munications between the bus driver 
and the Special Services staff in the 
Washington garage, 1200 Washington 
blvd. Delivery of the bus order is to be 
completed by next Feb. 15. 

Purchase of the 20 new buses is 
funded by federal and state govern- 
ments. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Members of the Peer Group Review, representing seven municipalities, inspected one of 
20 new buses to be deilvered to the Washington garage for Special Services, which pro- 
vides transportation for the mobility limited. Members of the group are (from left) Harold 
Gelssenhelmer, CTA General Operations Manager; David Johnson, Denver; Tom Knight, 
Milwaukee County; David Nalditch, Minneapolls-St. Paul; Roger Slllars, Cleveland; Isaac 
Beal, Superintendent, Washington garage; Tom Letky, Pittsburgh; Anthony Monachino, 
Cleveland, and Anthony KInahan, Boston. 



Meanwhile, the Peer Group 
Review, comprised of Special Services 
managers from Milwaukee, Pitts- 
burgh, Cleveland, Minneapolis-St. 
Paul, Denver, and Boston, held its 
second meeting in Chicago to share 
information on matters of common in- 
terest. 

Topics for discussion ranged from 
eligibility of applicants for service to 
how much assistance an operator 
should provide a Special Services 
rider. Productivity, demand response, 
and subscription service were also 
matters of concern to members of the 
group. 

CTA Superintendent of Special Ser- 
vices Isaac Beal said more has been 
accomplished for Special Services 
marketing by CTA than by other 
members of the Peer Group. Beal said 
members of his staff have visited more 
than 78 hospitals, made presentations 
to church groups and have had exten- 
sive radio and television coverage, as 
well as print media exposure. "This ac- 
counts for our rapid growth," Beal 
said. 

CTA Special Services ridership 
climbed from 531 rides in its first 
month of service to 7,860 rides in the 
11th month of service. The total 



Special Services ridership in the first 
year was 74,000 rides. 

A common problem to everyone in 
the Peer Group is consumer "no 
shows and cancellations" which Beal 
said may be controlled once strict 
policy is established. CTA has already 
implemented a policy which calls for 
the suspension of service to con- 
sumers with three "no shows" in a 
30-day period. The policy was 
established after consultation with 
members of the CTA Advisory Coun- 
cil which comprises community groups 
including various mobility limited 
riders who themselves subscribe to 
CTA Special Services. 

Beal said "no shows and cancella- 
tions" deprive other people of service 
and cut down on the number of rides 
that may be provided daily. A boost to 
Special Services transportation is the 
transfer from short distance buses to 
long distance, or fast link, the group 
agreed. Beal said this service increases 
productivity. 

He also said that CTA is continuing 
to provide an intensive training pro- 
gram for Special Services personnel, 
and urged other Peer Group Review 
members to adopt a similar intensive 
training program for their personnel. 



Texas breakfast 
marks anniversary 
of Special Services 

Personnel and staff at Washington 
Garage observed the first anniversary 
of Special Services September 21 with 
an old-fashion steak and eggs 
breakfast. 

More than 100 people, including 
the 65 garage personnel, their guests 
and staff members, were treated to a 
Texas-style breakfast with all the trim- 
mings by the Washington garage 
management. 

Superintendent Isaac Beal said he 
and his assistant superintendents, 
maintenance supervisor and instruc- 
tors made sure there was plenty of 
steak, eggs, grits, toast, orange juice 
and coffee to go around. Beal said 
personnel on each shift enjoyed the 
anniversary treat. 

Sharing the expenses with Beal 
were Assistant Superintendents Jay 
Hampton, Mary Beth Cobleigh, 
Rosalio Garcia, and Herbert Williams; 
Maintenance Unit Supervisor Willie 
Wong, and Instructors John Perkins 
and William Claibourne who cooked 
and did KP. 

"We thought it was a good way to 
observe the occasion. The guests we 
had were people who just happened 
to drop in. We didn't really have in- 
vitations as such," said Beal. 

Garage crew, 
staff enjoy fest 
of Orion films 

Orion Films treated Washington 
Garage Superintendent Isaac Beal and 
his staff and crew to lunch as the film 
company finished shooting scenes for 
"Class," a comedy on location in 
Chicago with Jacqueline Bisset and 
Cliff Robertson. 

It was Orion Production Manager 
Hal Polaire's way of saying thanks for 
the support Washington Garage gave 
his behind the scenes crew during film- 
ing of the movie, which is slated to be 
released in early 1983. 

Polaire's mobile caterers parked 
their big home style kitchen near 
Washington and Racine where they 
fed CTA employees until their hearts 
and stomachs were content. The 
delicious repast included a choice of 
baked fillet of sole, beef burgundy, a 
variety of side dishes, among them a 
very tasty chili, and dessert. 

Said Polaire, "One good turn 
deserves another. Mr. Beal and his 
people were very accommodating as 
we worked in this area." 



NOVEMBER. 1982 



Curtis Johnson (77th Street 
garage) "makes it a pleasure 
to ride the CTA," according to 
Roger DeGroot, of Oak Lawn, 
a frequent rider on his West 
95th Street bus. "IHe does not 
accelerate wildly or jam on 
the brakes. He is considerate 
of the bus equipment, going 
out of his way to miss holes. 
He calls out the stops. He 
always looks up side streets 
to spot people who are run- 
ning toward the bus stop, and 
waits the few seconds it 
takes for them to make the 
bus. In the early morning 
hours, when buses are not so 
frequent, this can make the 
difference between getting to 
work on time or not." 




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Andrew McDaniel (Beverly 
garage) won the approval of 
John Korienek, of Champlain 
Avenue, for maintaining order 
on his No. 104 Pullman bus. 
"A girl about 17 boarded the 
bus, paid 50 cents, and, when 
questioned, said she was 12 
years old. The driver wouldn't 
move the bus, insisting that 
she add 40 cents to the till. 
She refused, and all the kids 
in the bus started to threaten 
the driver. 'It's not your 
money' was a mild yell. 'Yes it 
is,' he insisted. 'I'm paid to 
collect the money due CTA.' 
Finally a boy gave her 50 
cents, and she deposited it in 
the fare box. I told him I ap- 
preciated his guts." 



commendation corner 



Anastacio Reyes (North Avenue garage) "did his job 
well (maybe even above duty)," wrote M. Jesdimer, of 
North Lockwood Avenue, who rode his No. 74 Fullerton 
bus one Friday night. "About 60 or more teenagers got on 
the bus at Central, and it was difficult for him to collect fares 
and see that none got on without paying. The bus was full of 
noisy and disturbing teenagers, but he held his ground until 
the police arrived. The police came and put down the dis- 
turbance, but when the police got off the bus they started 
again. The police got on again and made all of them get off 
the bus. The driver then proceeded. " 

Herman Trimuel (North Park garage) is appreciated by 
David Burkin, of North Claremont Avenue, for his courtesy 
toward riders on his No. 155 Devon bus. "He knows most 
of his early morning passengers by name, and never fails to 
greet them with a cheery 'Good morning.' if one should fail 
to get his bus on any particular morning, he always greets 
them the next day with 'We missed you yesterday; hope 
you were well.' 1 for one am most pleased to meet a public 
servant such as he. I'm sure that sentiment is shared by the 
many riders who are privileged to ride his bus." 

Alvin Polowczyk (Forest Glen garage) was the operator 
of a No. 68 Northwest Highway bus that Patrick Lenihan, of 
Santa Clara, California, rode one day to Park Ridge. "This 
driver not only called out all the main crossings, but every 
street in between. At Nagle he waited for a woman running 
for his bus. She boarded and thanked him. He answered, 
'It's my pleasure to wait.' The two weeks I spent in Chicago I 
rode several buses. It's so relaxing to ride when the driver 
calls the streets. I hope you will let this driver know there are 
people out there who appreciate his careful driving." 



Kenneth Richards (52nd Street garage) was con- 
gratulated by Toni Stroud, of East End Avenue, for "an ex- 
cellent job" as operator of No. 6 Jeffery and No. 14 South 
Lake Shore Express buses. "He is doing a superb job on 
these routes, while allowing me to feel safe traveling to work 
in the downtown area. I also thank him for making my 
traveling easier because of the wonderful hints he has given 
me. His kindness and smile create an atmosphere of ap- 
preciation. He is friendly and courteous, offering small talk 
and laughs. He is polite and extremely nice to his elderly 
passengers." 

Michael Powell (North Section), a conductor on the 
Ravenswood route, was applauded by Celia Zak, of North 
Sawyer Avenue, who rides his train frequently from the 
Kimball terminal. "When the temperature is in the lOO's, or 
if the weather is below zero, this fine gentleman can make 
you forget all the irritation you have experienced with his 
pleasant witticisms and his unfailing good nature. He is a 
rare human being, and is loved by everyone who has the 
pleasure of riding with him. Please let him know he is much 
appreciated for his fine service and good humor." 

Michael Buchanan (North Park garage) was com- 
plimented by Edith Lapidus, of Devon Avenue, "for his 
courtesy and patience to his passengers, especially the older 
folks" on his No. 155 Devon bus. "When I had difficulty 
boarding the bus, he pulled the bus closer to the curb. I sat 
up front and observed how pleasant he was to all the peo- 
ple, answering their questions with a smile. When I got off 
the bus I told him, 'You are a swell guy,' and I meant it. I 
believe in telling people how nice they are when they 
deserve it. This man is definitely as asset to the CTA." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Thelma Young (Forest Glen 
garage) was praised as "a 
great person" by Arlene 
Stahnke, of North Natoma 
Avenue, who was a rider on 
her No. 91 Austin bus. "After 
riding public transportation 
for more years than I care to 
remember, I just had to write 
this letter concerning driver 
No. 4185. When I ride with 
this lady, I can relax and en- 
joy my reading. She is terrific 
in heavy traffic and makes 
the ride as comfortable as 
possible, easing over the 
many potholes that seem to 
have grown in the past years. 
I just can't say enough for 
this kind, considerate and 
polite lady." 





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Leroy Ward (North Park 
garage) impressed Ellen 
Sliter, of Brighton Place, with 
his courtesy as operator of a 
No. 36 Broadway bus. "When 
two elderly women were hav- 
ing difficulty boarding, he 
was patient and considerate, 
allowing them to be seated 
before moving the bus. He 
was most courteous when 
one of them asked a question 
which was hardly audible. 
They asked him questions 
two other times during the 
trip, and each time he 
answered politely and with 
the utmost respect. Several 
other passengers who also 
asked questions were not at 
all mild-mannered, but he 
treated them with respect as 
well." 



Leonard Peterson (North Park garage) was admired by 
Margaret Foster, of North Sheridan Road, for the way he 
handled his No. 146 Marine/Michigan Express bus one 
afternoon rush period on Lake Shore Drive. "He showed 
great intelligence and good reactions when he averted a 
three-car crash which came inches from the bus. He very 
quickly swerved the bus to the right-hand lane. He was 
remarkable, and several of the riders who were standing 
said he should get the driver-of-the-year award. 1 know this 
gentleman is also polite and courteous, because I caught his 
bus once or twice before." 



Willie Scott (North Park garage) was commended "for 
his thoughtful consideration, pleasant attitude and efficient 
manner" on a No. 36 Broadway bus by Carolyn Freeman, 
of South Dearborn Street. "Being a new resident, I was at 
quite a loss trying to locate relatives on the North Side of the 
city. I asked the driver if he could instruct me, and after tak- 
ing care of the boarding passengers, he showed me how to 
get to the address. I cannot express how appreciative I am 
for his patience and polite manner. I noticed he handled 
other passengers also in a manner that was very professional 
as well as courteous." 



Pedro Santiago (North Park garage) earned the admira- 
tion of Shirley Epstein, of Lunt Avenue, for the way he 
handled riders when his No. 151 Sheridan bus was rerouted 
one Sunday. "The buses were quite late; their schedules 
were way off. The passengers, including me, were upset 
because the driver was ordered to take a different route, 
which meant, of course, that we were to be deposited at in- 
convenient places. However, through all the anger and 
hostility, the driver maintained his cool and poise. In fact, he 
had a good sense of humor. He put the passengers at ease, 
and the wrath soon dissipated." 

Cedric Crosbie (Beverly garage) pleased Sister M. 
Methodia, of Oak Lawn, with the way he dealt with a rule- 
breaking rider on his West 103rd Street bus. "The bus drove 
up to Brother Rice to pick up quite a number of students. As 
would occur, one of them began to smoke. The driver 
slowed down, came to a complete stop, and demanded 
firmly that smoking should stop. He waited momentarily, 
and the guilty smoker put out the cigarette. All this was done 
with dignity and authority, and the smoker complied instant- 
ly. No rebuff. No argument. It takes a lot of courage 
sometimes. But it helps." 



Jerry Miller (North Park garage) caught the attention of 
Frank Hinckly, of Belmont Avenue, who rode his No. 22 
Clark bus from Belmont to the Loop. "Upon tendering my 
transfer, i was a little taken aback when the driver thanked 
me. All the way downtown he thanked everyone who either 
tendered a transfer, paid cash, or showed their pass. In ad- 
dition, the driver called out every stop loud and clear, and 
operated his bus with smooth, even stops and starts. As a 
former Chicago Surface Lines motorman, and fairly cons- 
tant rider of today, I feel qualified to comment on this 
driver's overall excellence." 

Antonio Jimenez (North Park garage) was regarded as 
"one of the most pleasant and helpful bus drivers I have ever 
met," by Helen Page, of St. Louis, who rode his No. 151 
Sheridan bus to Union Station. "He was very patient with 
me when I boarded the bus with almost more luggage than I 
could handle. He even asked if I needed help. While riding, 
I could see that he was kind, courteous and considerate to 
everyone. He made a habit of speaking to people, smiling, 
and talked briefly to those who needed conversation. At the 
same time, he kept his mind on the job and handled his bus 
with respect for the live cargo." 



NOVEMBER, 1982 



Re: Charles Young 

Badge No. 23328 



Mr. Michael Cardilli, Chairman October 29, 1982 

Chicago Transit Authority 
Merchandise Mart 
P.O. Box 3555 
Chicago, Illinois 60654 

Dear Michael: 

Having ridden the CTA transportation system for the past thirty (30) years 1 
have had the personal opportunity to observe a number of CTA employees in 
the performance of their duties. 

However, it wasn't until two days ago that I felt compelled to write to you 
about the extraordinary performencs of one of your employees, namely 
Charles Young, who was the conductor on my evening northbound EL. 

While I am sure we can all agree that the tasks relating to announcing stops 
can be quite mundane and uneventful; nontheless. Mr. Young exhibited a 
professionalism and enthusiasm in the manner, tone and context of his an- 
nouncements which would rival any similar endeaver by our finest airlines. It 
is precisely this type of conduct that makes the public aware and appreciative 
of the services the CTA is rendering them and it directly reflects credit upon 
your entire organization. 

The actions of one person, such as Mr. Young's have an enormous affect 
on the attitude of the riding public . It certainly did so on me to the extent that I 
am writing this letter to commend you on your good fortune of having an 
employee like Mr. Young constantly selling the CTA to the public through his 
outstanding performance of his assigned duties. 

Most Sincerely, 

Kenneth W. Sain 

Director, Regional Transportation Authority 



Thanks — for a 
job well done 

Jose Almeida, Forest Glen 
Curtis Anderson, North Park 

Jose Batista, Limits 
Michael Batson, Howard/Kimball 
James Bibbs, 69th Street 
William Blackwell Jr., North Park 
Ricardo Bonilla, North Avenue 
Steven Branch, Archer 
Steve Brooks, 52nd Street 
Alvin Brown, Archer 

Jeane Cage, North Park 
Charles Carter, 77th Street 
Lawrence Carter, 77th Street 
Denise Cherry, Limits 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Michael Cobleigh, North Park 
Cedric Crosbie, Beverly 
Grade Curtis, 69th Street 

Butros Daoud, Forest Glen 
Leon Davis, 77th Street 
William Davis, 77th Street 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 

Eugene Embry, Ashland Terminal 

Allan Frazier, Limits 



Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 

Daniel Galarza, North Park 
Phillip Gary, 69th Street 
Raymond Grant Jr., Rail-North 
Latimore Graves Jr., Archer 
George Gray, Archer 

Nathaniel Hawkins Jr., Limits 
Leon Hegwood, Howard/Kimball 
Wally Henry, Archer 
Peyton Hightower, 77th Street 
Mary Holt, Limits 

Jettie Jackson, Lawndale 
Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Eileen Jensen, Forest Glen 
Rosetta Jones, 69th Street' 
Willie Jones, Forest Park 

Michael Kelly, Douglas/Congress 

Tyrone Laury, Ashland Terminal 
Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland Ter- 
minal 

Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Dominic Lochirco, Archer 
John Lovasz, Forest Glen 

James Mallard, Archer 
Maurice Manson, 77th Street 
Daryl McClure, North Park 
Ira Milton, Relief Area-Bus 
Freddie Morris Jr., 77th Street 




Perfect game 

Holy Cross High School's bowling 
team has an exceptional kegler in 
senior Terrance J. Muellner, 17, son 
of CTA Maintenance Unit Supervisor 
Terry Muellner. The youth bowled a 
300 game recently as his sanctioned 
ABC Holy Cross High School League 
team met at Belmont Avenue's Turner 
Bowl. The young high school bowler 
was presented with a new bowling ball 
and bag. 

William Neal, Lawndale 

Nathaniel Parker, 

Douglas/Congress 
Perry Patten, Limits 
John Pelzman, Beverly 
Robert Pope Jr., Limits 
Hcberto Pulgar, North Avenue 

Robert Handle, Ashland Terminal 
Luis Rizo, North Avenue 
James Robinson, Archer 
James Rubio, Archer 

Pedro Santiago, North Park 

Homer Savage, Limits 

Charles Smith, North Avenue 

Mellowneice Springfield, 69th 

Street 

Marion Stubbs, North Park 

Vytautas Stukelis, Archer 

Carol Turner, Lawndale 

Allen Wade, 52nd Street 
Gloria Warren, South Section 
Emma Watt, Beverly 
Bennie Wesley, Archer 
Jerry Williams, Douglas/Congress 
Vickie Williams, 77th Street 
Frederick Wilson Jr., 77th Street 
Theaorchi Woodard. North Park 

Carlos Zapata, Lawndale 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Time a major factor 
in APTA International 
Bus Roadeo 

Manual steering made the difference in the American 
Public Transit Association Bus Roadeo event as CTA 
representative John Odom moved within one point of the 
1982 winner, but lost points on the time required to com- 
plete the course. 

Superintendent of Training Elonzo Hill said Odom, of 
69th Street garage, garnered 671 of the maximum 700 
points as he drove a near-perfect course in the Boston, 
Mass. event which was held October 19. 

Judges, however, deducted 105 points off Odom's 
score--one point for every second over the maximum 
seven minutes alloted contestants to complete the course. 
Odom's time was eight minutes, 45 seconds. 

Hill said the 59 contestants representing transit properties 
throughout North America were given five minutes to prac- 
tice with the manually steered buses which are used in 
revenue service by the Massachusctt Bay Transit Authority 
(MBTA), 1982 host for the APTA event. 'Tm sure that 
made a difference," Hill said. 

Hill, a member of the 10-man International Bus Roadeo 
Committee which conducts the annual event, said APTA 
Roadeo contest rules require all contestants to use vehicles 
provided by the host property. 

Line Instructor Odom, a 21-year CTA veteran, was the 
winner of the 1982 local Bus Roadeo held July 25 at Soldier 
Field, which qualified him for the APTA International event. 
Odom and his wife, Mary, were recipients of an all-expenses 
paid trip to Boston. 

After scores were tallied for the 1982 International event, 
the APTA prize of $1,000 and a commemorative plaque 
was awarded for the third consecutive year to James Boring 
of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority 
(MARTA), who took the event with 672 points. 

Hill said following the event, "Although John Odom was 
out of the running, we think he can justly be proud of his 
performance. He is still Chicago's winner and we are very 
proud of him." 

CTA Public Affairs/Consumer Services Group Manager 
Michael N. Horowitz said CTA was well represented at the 
APTA conference which hosted 3,000 transit personnel and 
other officials from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. 
CTA speakers and panel participants at the Boston meeting 
were Executive Director Bernard J. Ford, General Opera- 
tions Manager Harold H. Geissenheimer, Director of Rail 
Maintenance Frank Venezia, and Horowitz. 

Ford gave APTA members a progress report on the work 
of the Rail Safety Review Board and common issues relating 
to the future of the transit industry. Geissenheimer ad- 
dressed the problem of coping with the flood of dollar bills, 
and Venezia was a panel moderator on the subject of im- 
proving Maintenance Management and Productivity. 
Horowitz and members of the panel on which he served 
discussed Transit Managers Meeting the Press. 




Annual sports banquet 

Arliss Jones (left), coach of the General Office basketball 
team, and Elcosie Gresham (2nd from left), first vice presi- 
dent of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 241, were 
among sports enthusiasts participating in the annual CTA 
Sports banquet held at the Harvey Holiday Inn recently. 
Others on the program (from left) were Will Williams, 
basketball sports coordinator; Ronald Tuck, master of 
ceremonies, and Larry McNeil, Westside "L" basketball 
coach. McNeil and Jones are also members of the Basket- 
ball League Board of Directors. 




Birds of wisdom 

This varied display of ceramic owls, with a few books about 
the creatures interspersed, is the collection of CTA Librarian 
Violette Brooks. The collection was on display recently in 
the children's room of the Carter G. Woodson Regional 
Library at 95th and Halsted streets. Ms. Brooks, a former 
school librarian, said she associates the owl with learning 
because it represents wisdom. The growing collection, 
valued at $100, is a pastime which Ms. Brooks began about 
four years ago. 



NOVEMBER. 1982 



Fire-fighting 
driUs promote 
storeroom 
safety 

Preparing for the worst is often a 
good way of making sure it won't hap- 
pen, and that's what William Roman, 
director of Stores, Materials Manage- 
ment, had in mind when he asked the 
Safety Department to organize a series 
of fire-fighting drills recently at four 
CTA storeroom facilities. 

John Gill, supervisor. Stores - 63rd 
Street Yard, provided the initial push 
for the program when he and James 
Whittley, supervisor. Stores - West, 
determined that the passage of time 
had put their people somewhat out of 
touch with the latest fire fighting 
techniques. 

There was another incentive as well 
that led to the decision to hold fire 
safety sessions. A new storeroom had 
been opened at Skokie Shop, where 
materials were stored as high as 21 
feet above floor level. With the added 
height came the potential danger that 
a fire starting down below could 
spread beyond immediate reach if it 




Chicago Fire Department Lt. Richard Murphy (second from left) explains the use of a 
high-pressure hose at SI(okie Storeroom 42 to (left to right) Jim Mullen, procurement 
analyst, Materials Management; John Boyce, safety standards specialist; and Tom 
Boyle, Manager, Safety. 



were not quickly extinguished. 

To reduce the chance for a fire to 
spread, high-pressure hose lines as 
well as sprinklers were included in the 
building's design, providing a new 
dimension in fire-fighting facilities on 
CTA property. What was needed now 
was for all personnel to learn how to 
use the equipment properly in an 




Safety Department Manager Tom Boyle (left) observed fire-fighting session outside 
Skokie Shop, where hose line was tested by warehousemen Jim McMahon (right, holding 
nozzle) and Lou Kasper. 



emergency. 

To meet the various requirements of 
the section, the Safety Department's 
John Boyce, safety standards 
specialist, and Philip Cahill, industrial 
safety analyst, worked up a program 
of fire-fighting training for Materials 
Management personnel not only at 
Skokie Shop, but also at South Shops, 
West Shop, and 63rd Street Yard. 

Lt. Richard Murphy, of the Chicago 
Fire Department's Fire Prevention 
Bureau, was called in to demonstrate 
fire-fighting techniques involving the 
use of hose lines. 

The program, which was conducted 
over an eight-day period, allowed 71 
Materials Management participants to 
gain experience with an assortment of 
fire equipment. 

In addition, personnel were taught 
how to choose the type of equipment 
appropriate to the nature of the fire, 
while being ever mindful of the need 
always to call the Fire Department 
before trying to extinguish a fire 
themselves. 

Safety Department Manager Tom 
Boyle said the training was a reward- 
ing experience for everyone who 
took part. "We were happy to help 
Materials Management set up this pro- 
gram, and we look forward to 
cooperating with any other depart- 
ment that wants instruction of this kind 
to make CTA a safer place to work." 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Police nab two after employee alerts 



Agent Supervisor Mary Marble 
knew something was out of order as 
she observed a passenger on a south- 
bound Dan Ryan train selling monthly 
passes. 

When the train arrived at 95th street 
terminal, Mrs. Marble pointed the 
suspect out to police, signed a com- 
plaint, and a man was taken into 
custody. Arresting officers found six 
counterfeit monthly passes in his 
possession. 

Meanwhile, at Lawndale an alert 
bus operator averted what could have 
been a serious mishap after she saw a 
gunman in the garage bay area. 
Operator Martha Pace was in the bay 
when she saw three youths in the 
area, one with a sawed off shotgun. 
She immediately returned to the 
trainroom and notified the clerk who 
called police. The gun-toting youth 
was taken into custody. 

Transportation Manager James 
Blaa praised Mrs. Marble and Ms Pace 
for their attention to duty and alert ac- 
tion which saved the Authority addi- 
tional loss in revenue on the one 
hand, and averted a possible act of 
violence on the other. 

In a different responsible action, 
Station Clerk John Austin has taken 
on singlehandedly the task of compil- 
ing consumer information at 




Transportation Manager James Blaa (right) presents three Transportation employees 
who received certificates of special recognition for outstanding performance and atten- 
tion to duty. Displaying their certificates are (from left) Station Clerk John Austin, 
Washington garage; Agent Supervisor D/lary Marble, and Bus Operator Martha Pace, 
Lawndale garage. 



Washington garage, and program- 
ming the Special Service center's 
master computer to provide a quick 
reference for the Special Service staff 
and operating personnel. 

Garage Superintendent Isaac Beal 
said Austin's work with the computer 
has aided tremendously in expediting 
service to severely mobility limited 
consumers, simplified personnel, 
maintenance and transportation ser- 
vice records, as well as routine reports. 



'.^KSK^^Kk 


' 1 i 




kr- '^^I^^S^^^^^^^^^^^^^^R vn 



Agent Supervisor Mary Marble, 
Operator Martha Pace, and Station 
Clerk John Austin were each 
presented with certificates of special 
recognition by Transportation 
Manager James Blaa. The three 
employees also visited CTA offices at 
the Merchandise Mart where they 
received additional kudos for their 
outstanding efforts on behalf of CTA. 




Ban the buckl 

Bus operators! 

Dollar bills in fare boxes 
are increasing again! 

Help CTA save money by 
asking your riders to stop 
using dollar bills to pay 
fares. 



Warehouseman Dan McRedmond tried his 
hand at operating a dry chemical ex- 
tinguisher under the guidance of John 
Boyce, safety standards specialist. 



NOVEMBER, 1982 



Self-taught clerk provides information flow 



When John Austin was assigned to 
Washington Garage as clerk a year 
ago, he didn't set out to revolutionize 
the flow of information so vital to the 
operation at 1200 West Washington. 
But that is what happened. 

Washington Garage, home of CTA 
Special Services, provides 3,558 cer- 
tified consumers more than 7,000 
rides a month, an average of 300 rides 
a day. Efficiency of service for the 
severely mobility limited depends on 
available consumer information as well 
as available equipment and personnel 
to provide the service. 

Although schedulers at the Special 
Services facility are capable of pro- 
viding more than adequate informa- 
tion on any subscriber, Austin, a 
14-year employee, has not only com- 
piled valuable information on each 
subscriber, but also collected a wealth 
of information, all stored in the com- 
puter, on each employee and piece of 
equipment assigned to Washington 
Garage. At the flick of a button, the 
computer will list everything from 
drivers and consumers to operator 
performance. 

"We've needed someone to take on 
this job for a long time," said Isaac 
Beal, Superintendent at Washington 
Garage. Beal said that Austin began 
taking on the important responsibility 
of storing vital information in the com- 
puter shortly after his arrival at 
Washington Garage last year. "Now 
all the clerks want to know how it is 
done," said Beal, who plans to call on 
Austin to provide instruction. 

Austin, who had no previous ex- 
perience with computers, taught 




Station Clerk John Austin (left), 
Washington Garage, instructs Clerk 
Cleotha Carter on keying a computer for 
information vital to making transportation 
available to Special Service consumers. 

himself how to program information. 
Although his duty schedule requires 
him to work from 5:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., 
he is frequently found at his computer 
terminal working well beyond quitting 
time. "I have always been intrigued by 
numbers. Besides, here I have a 
chance to do something which I really 
enjoy," said Austin. 




Austin explains disk drives whicfi store in- 
formation for future use. 



To Your Health 

Whatisa^BPr 

by Linda C. Lapid, RN 
CTA Medical Dept. 

"BP" is short for blood pressure. It 
means the force exerted by the blood 
against the walls of the blood vessels, 
created by the pumping action of the 
heart. 

The blood passes from the heart 
throughout the body by way of 
systems of vessels, mainly the arteries 



and veins, and eventually returns to 
the heart. 

Blood pressure is greatest in the 
arteries and least in the veins. It is in 
the large artery of the arm where 
blood pressure is usually measured. 

The device used to measure 
blood pressure is called a 
"Sphygmomanometer." 

The greatest pressure occurs during 
the contraction of the heart and is 
known as "systolic," and the lowest 
pressure is during the relaxation or rest 
period and is known as "diastolic." 
Thus the reading 120/80 represents 
the systolic and diastolic pressures. 



Blood pressure varies from one in- 
dividual to another and in the same 
person from time to time. Thus it is 
lower in children than in adults and in- 
creases gradually with age. The blood 
pressure of women is slightly less than 
that of men. It is slightly increased in 
those who are overweight. During 
sleep the pressure is decreased slight- 
ly, during exercise it is increased. 
Likewise, a rise in pressure occurs dur- 
ing emotional excitement. These in- 
creases are temporary and simply 
reflect normal adjustment of the heart 
and blood vessels to meet the existing 
situation. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Elgar's'Pomp and Circumstance'never sounded better to Burt Bosan as he marches into 
the ball room at Pier II, Marina City on "graduation night." He is accompanied by 
ceremonial "marshals" Linda Martinez (left), and Harriett Murphy. 

(Photo by Bert Cadney.) 

It's graduation, not retirement 



After 30 years in the work force 
most people retire and move to 
Florida, Arizona, or some similar 
climatic area where health spas and 
elderly folk are plentiful, but not Bur- 
ton Harold Bosan. 

Youngster-at-heart Bosan, affec- 
tionally called Burt, "graduated." His 
CTA career began in 1952 in the 
Transportation department. Two 
years later he became a training aids 
technician, a job he held for 28 years 
where he applied his talents as an ar- 
tist. 

The commencement exercise, held 
September 24 at Marina City, was at- 
tended by 125 well-wishers, a 
testimony to the lives he touched over 
his 30 years of service. They all came 
to roast the artist-in -residence who 
was ceremoniously making his exit. 

"I still stand in awe of the man who 
taught me how to sleep with my eyes 
open," commented Bernard J. Ford, 
CTA Executive Director as he address- 
ed the audience enjoying the roast. 

Frank Johnson of the Human 
Resources department recalled a note 
placed on the nodding Burt's desk 
some 25 years ago which said in 
essence, "As long as you're asleep. 
You've got a job, but when you wake 
up, you're fired." Johnson then gave 
Bosan a silver dollar--the same one 
Burt had given him 25 years earlier. 

Peter J. Meinardi, former Manager, 
General Administration /Finance who 



retired in 1974, remembers Burt as a 
good employee always willing to lend 
a helping hand. 

His willingness to help has been a 
Bosan trait as long as anyone can 
remember. He has shared a wealth of 
special talents quietly with everyone 
from his high school days at Wendell 
Phillips where his artistry began, up to 
the present moment. 

After Wendell Phillips, Burt attend- 
ed the Art Institute of Chicago for a 
brief period before pursuing some 
courses at DePaul. He served in the 
U.S. Army Air Corps' Corp of 
Engineers as a draftsman until he join- 
ed the Army Band as a trombone 
player. 

As an army musician, he spent two 
and a half years in England, and later 
traveled throughout the European 
continent. Bosan spent a year in Paris 
where he studied art before returning 
to the United States to an assignment 
with the First U.S. Army Band in 
Washington. 

No stranger to the easel, Burt Bosan 
sketched or painted the portraits of 
many CTA employees, particularly as 
they, like Burt, "graduated" to a life of 
leisure. 

Today, Burt continues his labor of 
love as a free lance artist. He shares 
the good life in his southsidc home 
with his wife of 32 years, Evelyn, and 
their four children, Sharon, Gabrielle, 
Faith, and Burton III. 




Samuel Vaughan 

elected to 

Cook County Board 

Samuel Vaughan, claim represen- 
tative. Claims Department, since 
1978, retired November 23 after 30 
years of service with CTA. He will take 
on new responsibilities shortly as a 
commissioner on the Cook County 
Board, having won election to the post 
November 2. 

Vaughan, who has long been active 
in community affairs in his Maple Park 
neighborhood on the Far South Side, 
is looking forward to using his new 
position to improve conditions in the 
community. He particularly hopes to 
help reduce infant mortality 
throughout the city. 

After joining CTA in 1952 as a 
motorman on one-man streetcars at 
the 38th Street station, Vaughan 
served as a bus operator at Archer 
garage before becoming a relief station 
clerk in 1963. He moved to the Claims 
Department in 1967. 

Vaughan attended Howard Univer- 
sity in Washington, D.C., and the Il- 
linois Institute of Technology, in 
Chicago, and took a course in proper- 
ty damage claims adjustment at Vale 
National Training Center, in 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. 

Vaughan's wife, Willie Mae, has 
been a CTA ticket agent since 1967. 
Their daughter, Joyce, was a recent 
graduate of the University of Illinois. 



NOVEMBER, 1982 



13 



Service anniversaries 
in October 

40 years 



William Scott 

Maintenance 



35 years 

Anthony Blazevich, Maintenance 
Joe Cecala, Internal Auditing 
Raymond Colello, Lawndale 
Roy Goebig, Beverly 
Stanley Hillock. South Shops 
Joseph Marszaiek, Construction 
Casimir Noga, Archer 



30 years 

Harvzird Blanks, Lawndale 
Thomas Bodie, 77th Street 
Robert Brown. Ashland/95th 
Evel Bunton. Maintenance 
Chester Ciciura, 69th Street 
Roy Evans, South Shops 



25 years 

De Wayne Allen. District A 
William Beirrow, Archer 
Dennis Coleman Jr., 69th Street 
Archie Davis, 69th Street 
James Dorsey, Ashland/95th 
David Ford, 52nd Street 
James Hurdle. Beverly 
William Lawson. 69th Street 
Edward Pruitt, South Shops 



Steven Nowak, Douglas 
Dorothy Parker. West Section 
Michael Rickson. Maintenance 
Sam Spizzirri. Maintenance 
Robert Tausch. Maintenance 
Theodore Zawistowski. Forest Glen 



John Holiman. Maintenance 
Hurley Hunter, Lawndale 
Robert Kilpatrick. Maintenance 
Dawson Samples, South Shops 
Leo Smith. Maintenance 



David Semmes. Beverly 
Myron Severson. Skokie Shop 
John Singleton Jr.. 59th Street 
L. C. Smith. Maintenance 
George Stephens Jr.. 77th Street 
O. D. Stewart. Maintenance 
Richard Vieth. Electrical 
Joe Weatherspoon. Maintenance 
Matthew Williams Jr.. Lawndale 



NEW PENSIONERS 



BURTON BOSAN, Trng. Aids Tech II, 

Pub. AffVCons. Srvcs., Emp. 9-19-52 
RICHARD BUSSIE, Fac. Inspector, 

Fac, Engr, & Maint., Emp. 11-15-76 
FRANCIS GALLAGHER, Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 9-7-50 
FRANK GIBASIEWICZ, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 5-21-45 
JOHN HALKO Jr., Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 2-12-46 
HOWARD HOEPPNER, Asst Supt., 

Near South, Emp. 8-15-49 
ALFRED HOWARD, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 2-3-53 
SAMMIE LANE, Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 9-10-56 
ARTHUR RABEN, Asst. Supt., 

Jefferson Park, Emp. 1-15-61 
ISADORE WILKINS, Bus & Truck Mech., 

Equip. Eng. & Maint., Emp. 5-14-47 



DISABILITY RETIREMEm- 

ANNABELLE DREW, Ticket Agent, 
North Section, Emp. 2-24-52 



LAWRENCE BERMINGHAM, 72, Dist. B, 

Emp. 4-19-34, Died 8-2-82 
WALTER BIERNAT, 65, 69th Street, 

Emp 3-6-58, Died 8-1-82 
LOUIS BOHLIN, 88, Transportation, 

Emp, 9-20-09, Died 8-30-82 
FRANK BRONSON, 90, 69th Street, 

Emp 5-21 18, Died 8-17-82 
LOUIS CACCIATORE, 87, Way & Structs 

Emp 4-18-22, Died 7-28-82 
CLETUS COBLEIGH, 65, Beverly, 

Emp 10-3-47, Died 8-7 82 
FRANK CORRIGAN, 72, Electrical, 

Emp 9-21-36, Died 8-12-82 
JOSEPH DARGIS, 89, West Shops, 

Emp 6-12-11, Died 8-23-82 
WILLIAM DiGIOIA, 76, North Avenue. 

Emp 8-20-41, Died 8-29-82 
ARTHUR DOYLE, 81, Electrical, 

Emp 5-25-25, Died 8-23-82 
ROY EGBERT, 74, South Shops, 

Emp 7-2-23, Died 8-31-82 



I3sr isa::hiis/lo:rt.a^is/l 



WILLIAM FARRELL, 85, Beverly, 

Emp. 1-6-20, Died 8-19-82 
WALTER GORZ, 75, West Section, 

Emp. 9-3-35, Died 8-4-82 
PATRICK GRIFFIN, 83, Engineering, 

Emp. 6-11-26, Died 8-1-82 
JAMES JAGOS, 74, Lawndale 

Emp 10-2-46, Died 8-21-82 
OSCAR JOHNSON, 86, North Avenue, 

Emp 7-16-23, Died 8-21-82 
LEROY MARSHALL, 67, West Shops, 

Emp 9-5-57, Died 8-29-82 
WALTER MASLOWSKI, 82, Archer, 

Emp 9-22-42, Died 8-13-82 
GEORGE MEYER, 73, Forest Glen, 

Emp 8-21-41, Died 8-23-82 
JOSEPH MILLER, 82, Lawndale, 

Emp 7-8-25, Died 8-5-82 
ELMER NEUBAUER, 80, Forest Glen, 

Emp 5-28-28, Died 8-14-82 
SAMUEL POSNER. 66, Limits, 

Emp 9 12-42, Died 8 24 82 



ZETTA PRAUL, 80, West Section, 

Emp 814 25, Died 8-15-82 
EDWARD RAFTERY, 83, Const. & Maint. 

Emp. 6-25-17, Died 8-20-82 
HAROLD ROSE, 81, Shops & Equip , 

Emp 11-27-28, Died 8-16-82 
EARL RUTH, 72, 77th Street, 

Emp 9-4-41, Died 8-25-82 
JOSEPH SCHUR, 73, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 2-20-35, Died 8-23-82 
THOMAS STIPATI, 78, Electrical, 

Emp 5-1-35, Died 8-4-82 
JESSIE SUNTER, 87, Law, 

Emp 8-7-17, Died 8-13-82 
HAROLD THEDENS, 67, South Section, 

Emp 9-30-47, Died 8-5-82 
THOMAS THORPE, 75, Building Div , 

Emp 8-10-42, Died 7-31-82 
DAVID WELLEHAN, 76, South Shops, 

Emp 1-25-28, Died 8-4-82 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Law for today 



Q. My husband and I purchased a 
home on a "contract for deed" 
arrangement. Now we find 
that we must pay for 
numerous repairs. Since our 
contract says nothing about 
this, must we continue paying 
for all these repairs? 

A. Unless your contract states dif- 
ferently, you must assume all the 
responsibilities of ownership of the 
home, which includes 
maintenance and the payment of 
any taxes and insurance. 

- • Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. is it legal for someone to 
stand on a public roadway for 
the purpose of soliciting 
donations from the occupants 
of a motor vehicle? 

A. Yes, but only if the following con- 
ditions are met: 

1. Such solicitation is expressly 
permitted by municipal or- 
dinance; 

2. Such solicitation occurs only at 
intersections where all traffic is 
required to come to a full stop; 

3. The persons engaged therein 
are at least 16 years old and 
wearing high visibility vests; 
and 

4. The soliciting agency is 
registered with the Attorney 
General as a charitable 
organization, is engaged in a 
statewide fund-raising activity, 
and is liable for the ordinary 
negligence of the soliciting 
agent. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I want to buy a new 
refrigerator and finance the 
purchase through the ap- 
pliance store. They want me 
to sign a contract that in- 
cludes a "confession of judg- 
ment" clause. Is this en- 
forceable? 

A. No. Confession of judgment 
clauses contained in a contract 
used in a consumer transaction in- 
volving the sale or lease of goods 
to an individual for personal or 
household uses are void. 

- - Illinois State Bar Association 

Submit question to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield, IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in columns. 
Personal answers not possible.) 



Service anniversaries in November 



40 years 




25 years 



Nick Spitalli 

Utility 



Arthur Hubacz 

Safety 



35 years 

William Cecich. Utility 
Sheldon Dein, Forest Glen 
Steven Dorich, Stores 
William Harris Jr., 77th Street 
Bernard Klatt, South Shops 
Edward Kuemmel, Forest Glen 
Frank McDermott, Electrical 
Edweurd Schurz Jr., Forest Glen 

30 years 

Herman Austin, North Avenue 
Horace Browning, North Avenue 
Patrick Healy, Archer 
Allen Jackson Jr., Limits 
Lino Lupetini, Skokie Shop 
Norwood Martin, Ashlancl/95th 
William Reynolds, District C 
Rsilph Stephens, Skokie Shop 
Raleigh Washington, 69th Street 
John Williams, Electrical 



Love Berry Jr., South Section 
Samuel Burns, District A 
Tony Grumpier, Maintenance 
Curtis Hagans, 77th Street 
George Kahlfeldt, Claims 
Thomas Kinard, 69th Street 
Clinton Lewis, 69th Street 
Jack Martin, Archer 
Robert Matthews, Schedules 
Richard Nelson, Maintenance 
Ronald Nelson, West Shops 
Richard Salinas, Maintenance 
Milford Shelton, Lawndale 
Harvey Smith, North Park 
Ezel Wiley, Archer 
Undberg Williams, Ashland/95th 



NEW PENSIONERS 



DOROTHY BELL, Sec'y/Steno I, 

Equip. Eng. & Maint,, Emp. 10-26-53 
BILLY BUTLER, Supervisor, 

Security, Emp. 11-2-59 
EDWARD MIZEROCKI, Car Repairman A, 

Kimball, Emp. 1-5-46 
CHARLES NELSON, Car Repairman A, 

98th Street, Emp. 7-1-52 
PATRICK NOLAN, Conductor, 

63rd & Ashland, Emp. 9-16-48 
ROBERT WALKER, Bus Servicer, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-28-72 



IKT I\/a:E!3VEOI^I.A.I^ 



ROSS CARTER, 73, Kedzie, 

Emp. 10-11-45, Died 9-5-82 
WILLIAM DEAN, 69, Maint , 

Emp. 3-30-44, Died 9-24-82 
ANGELO DelULIS, 81, Stores, 

Emp 8-29-28, Died 8-29-82 
JOHN ECK, 82, North Section, 

Emp. 4-17-18, Died 9-8-82 
MICHAEL FELTEN, 78, Shops & Equip., 

Emp, 12-18-41, Died 6-19-82 
SIMON GOLDMAN. 69, North Park, 

Emp. 2-2-44, Died 9-20-82 
PATRICK HICKEY, 100, South Section, 

Emp. 6-11-47, Died 9-13-82 
THOMAS IRWIN, 76, North Section, 

Emp. 7-31-41, Died 9-11-82 
MARION JEFFREY, 60, South Section, 

Emp 10-15-47, Died 3-19-82 
SIMON JULIAN, 86, Archer, 

Emp. 3-21-25, Died 9-7-82 
ROBERT KOSTECKI, 73, Archer, 

Emp. 1-27-42, Died 9-17-82 
WILLIAM LAMAR, 66, Lawndale, 

Emp. 5-17-54, Died 9-20-82 
HERMAN LANG, 70, North Avenue, 

Emp 4-8-46, Died 9-2-82 
MICHAEL LIBNER, 94, Skokie Shop, 

Emp, 7-24-34, Died 9-27-82 
JOHN LORIS, 78, South Shops, 

Emp, 8-1-24, Died 9-29-82 



CARL MAGNUSON, 89, 61st Street, 

Emp, 1-14-19, Died 9-9-82 
GEORGE MARTINI, 79, Engineering, 

Emp, 6-9-43, Died 9-18-82 
DAVID McDUFFY, 41, 77th Street, 

Emp, 3-24-75, Died 10-6-82 
WALTER MIELA, 79, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 11-19-25, Died 9-27-82 
ANDREW MOSER, 36, West Section, 

Emp. 9-11-79. Died 10-7-82 
THEODORE NIENABER, 83, South Shops, 

Emp. 1-11-37, Died 9-28-82 
THOMAS O'NEILL, 89, Kedzie, 

Emp, 1-8-20, Died 9-20-82 
MARTIN REYNOLDS, 60, North Section, 

Emp, 12-11-50, Died 10-17-82 
ALOYSIUS SERGEY, 72, Archer. 

Emp, 6-27-42, Died 9-6-82 
KATHRYN SHERWOOD, 89, North Section, 

Emp. 8-30-37, Died 9-6-82 
FRANK VORBORNIK, 76, Archer, 

Emp. 5-15-42, Died 9-20-82 
MIKE VULETIC, 88, Way & Structs., 

Emp. 6-16-27, Died 9-16-82 
BRUNO WARDA, 69, South Section, 

Emp. 7-19-40, Died 9-16-82 
LOUIS WELZIEN, 81, West Section, 

Emp, 1-3-23, Died 9-9-82 
OPAL YANT, 68, Accounting, 

Emp, 10-28-57, Died 9-19-82 



NOVEMBER, 1982 



Ruby anniversary 

On August 7, 1941, Maurice J. 
Buckley had been a clerk at Limits 
depot for three years when he received 
a letter from Uncle Sam making 
him an offer he couldn't refuse. 

Buckley dutifully doffed his 
transportation cap for a GI's hat, 
kissed his best girl goodbye, and went 
off to train as a soldier. He was later 
assigned to Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. 
as a radio operator. 

T-4 Maurice Buckley returned to 
Chicago 15 months later to exchange 
marriage vows at St. Benedict Roman 
Catholic church with his sweetheart, 
the former Ruth Stout of Atchison, 
Kan. After the wedding, it was back to 
garrison with the Sixth Infantry, Sixth 
Signal Company at Fort Leonard 
Wood. He spent two and a half years 
in the Pacific and was discharged in 
1945. 

After the war, Maury returned to his 



job as a clerk at Limits and today, after 
44 years of service in public transpor- 
tation, Maury Buckley says he'll retire- 
at the end of the year. 

On November 21, Mr. and Mrs. 
Buckley observed the "Ruby anniver- 
sary" — 40 years of wedded bliss. 
"She's still my bride," said Buckley as 
he remembered his wedding day dur- 
ing the war years. The happy couple 
are the proud parents of three sons, 
Dennis, Terrance, a ticket agent 
assigned to the North section, and 
John. They also have a grand- 
daughter, Tracy. 

Maury's retirement will signal the 
start of a leisurely pace for the second 
generation of the Buckley family with 
CTA or Chicago Surface Lines. His 
father, John, was a streetcar conduc- 
tor for more than 40 years, and was 
also assigned to Limits depot. 




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CTA TRANSrr NEWS 

Volume 35 Number 11 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division, Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs 'Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Contributing Writers: Elda Leal, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



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P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



DOCUKiENTS LIBRj\RIM TN 

Govt, Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
Evans ton, IL 60201 



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CHICAGO. ILL. 



7 // 



Mayor Byrne dedicates stations 
on O'Hare Extension 



* 




The Cumberland Avenue station on the O'Hare rapid transit ex- 
tension is dedicated in memory of Police Officer James Doyle by 
Mayor Jane M. Byrne. Among officials attending the ceremony 
along with members of Officer Doyle's family were (from left) CTA 
Chairman Michael Cardilli, Police Chaplain Nagle, Deputy 

Two more CTA stations on the O'Hare rapid transit ex- 
tension have been dedicated by Mayor Jane M. Byrne in 
memory of police officers killed in line of duty. 

Honored were Officers James Doyle who died last 
February 5, and Martin Emmett Darcy, Jr., who died 
September 27. Mayor Byrne culminated her December 2 
trip on the rapid transit extension from the Jefferson Park 
terminal to Cumberland Avenue by dedicating the 
Cumberland station in memory of Officer Doyle. 

The commemorative renaming of the Cumberland station 



Jackson Park 

Re-opening IseepageZ) 



Superintendent, Technical Services Matt Rodriguez, Deputy 
Superintendent, Community Services Ira Harris, Superintendent 
of Police Richard Brzeczek, Alderman Roman Pucinski, and 
Deputy Superintendent, Bureau of Investigative Services Thomas 
Lyons. 

in honor of Officer Doyle was followed by the dedication of 
the River Road station on December 7 in memory of Officer 
Darcy. The first such dedication commemorating a slain 
policeman was on October 20 when the station at Harlem 
Avenue was renamed in memory of Officer Richard J. 
O'Brien. 

Accompanying Mayor Byrne on the 4.2-mile ride from 
Jefferson Park terminal were CTA Chairman Michael Car- 
dilli and Jerome J. Butler, Commissioner of the City's 

(continued on page 2) 



TRANSIT NEWS 




FOR EMPLOYEES AND RETIREES 

DECEMBER, 1982 



Three stations 
are re-opened on 
Jackson Park elevated 



A $56 million project for modernizing the Jackson Park 
CTA elevated branch highlighted a major four-point pro- 
gram for revitalizing the East 63rd Street area. The an- 
nouncement was made December 12 by Mayor Jane 
Byrne. 

The Mayor said the City will work closely with the 
Woodlawn community and The Woodlawn Organization 
(TWO). At a ceremony marking the re-opening of the King 
Drive, Cottage Grove, and University Avenue stations. 
Mayor Byrne said the program will include a series of 
economic development, housing, and public facility pro- 
jects. 

The four-point program includes the modernization of the 
Jackson Park elevated branch which will not only encom- 
pass the newly-opened transit stations on the route, but a 
new terminal station at Dorchester Avenue west of the Il- 



linois Central Gulf railroad tracks. This station will provide 
direct access to both the ICG and the new CTA bus terminal 
east of the railroad station. 

The elevated stations at King Drive, Cottage Grove 
Avenue and University Avenue had been closed since last 
March when it was concluded that portions of the structure 
were unsafe. 

The re-opened Jackson Park elevated branch resumes 
service as the south end of the Jackson Park/Howard 
elevated route providing direct service between University 
Avenue on the south end, and Howard Street on the north 
end, via the State Street subway. 

Among dignitaries attending the ribbon cutting 
ceremonies were: CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli, Ex- 
ecutive Director Bernard J. Ford, Group Manage of Public 
Affairs/Consumer Services Michael N. Horowitz, CTA 
Board Member Howard Medley, City Treasurer Cecil 
Partee, and TWO President Leon Finney. 

Others were CTA Acting General Operations Manager 
James Blaa. Acting Manager of Transportation Harry Red- 
drick, and former CTA General Operations Manager Harold 
H. Geissenheimer, recently appointed General Manager of 
the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). 




While an honor guard salutes, Mrs. Patricia Darcy (left), and 
Mayor Jane M. Byrne (right) unveil the plaque honoring Police Of- 
ficer Martin E. Darcy, Jr., at the dedication of the River Road rapid 
transit station. Officer Darcy died September 27 of gunshot 
wounds sustained in line of duty. Police Superintendent Richard 
Brzeczek stands to the left of Mrs. Darcy. 



O'Hare dedications 

(continued from page 1) 

Department of Public Works, which is in charge of the con- 
struction of the $195 million O'Hare rapid transit project. 
The Mayor was also joined by members of the slain officers' 
families at the respective CTA stations. 

Mayor Byrne said the dedication of the Cumberland sta- 
tion represents "another important step toward the objective 
of providing rapid transit service from downtown Chicago to 
O'Hare International Airport as a major new link to our 
overall transit network." 

"It is with sadness that we dedicate this station in the 
memory of another slain Chicago police officer who sacri- 
ficed his life in the protection of others," said Mayor Byrne, 
who unveiled a plaque in memory of Officer Doyle. 

"I hope that when people see this plaque they will reflect 
on how important our police are to all of us." said the 
Mayor. 

The Doyle-Cumberland station, which was designed by 
the architectural firm of Perkins & Will, is a two-level facility 
with the platform level being connected with the fare collec- 
tion area by escalators, stairs, and an elevator. The platform 
is designed to accommodate 10-car rapid transit trains. 

Transit users will be able to enter the station from both 
sides of the Kennedy expressway by enclosed pedestrian 
bridges and from a glass-domed pedestrian center con- 
necting the station with a sheltered bus area and a parking 
structure. 

The parking structure for park 'n ride transit riders is a 
two-level facility with spaces for 714 cars. It is in the 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Mayor Jane Byrne addresses a platform crowd at the reopening of 
tlie University Avenue rapid transit station on the Jackson Parl< 
elevated branch. Accompanying the Mayor were (from left) Com- 
mitteeman Ray Castro, Seventh Ward; CTA Board Member 
Howard Medley; Alderman Tyrone Kenner, Third Ward; TWO 
President Leon Finney; City Treasurer Cecil Partee, and CTA 
Chairman Michael Cardilll. 



southwest quadrant of the expressway interchange. Also in 
this area is a bus terminal and a kiss 'n ride area for 27 cars. 
Construction cost of the new station being erected by Walsh 
Construction Company, is $17.7 million. 

At River Road, Mayor Byrne also unveiled a plaque of- 
ficially dedicating the station in memory of Police Officer 
Martin Emmett Darcy, Jr., who was killed while attempting 
to apprehend a murder suspect. 

"Officer Darcy served with distinction for 27 years," 
Mayor Byrne said, "and his death is mourned by all of us." 

The Darcy-River Road station, which was designed by the 
architectural firm of Metz, Train, Olsen & Youngren, is a 
single-level structure located in the median of the Kennedy 
expressway. 

Access to the station is by way of a pedestrian tunnel 
under the west-bound Kennedy lanes and then to the plat- 
form by escalators, an elevator and stairs. The platform is 
designed to accommodate 10-car rapid transit trains. 

Included in the overall station design are park 'n ride, kiss 
'n ride facilities, and a bus terminal located north of the ex- 
pressway adjacent to Des Plaines River Road. The parking 
capacity is 800 cars. 

The construction cost of the Darcy-River Road station is 
$7,885,000. Contractor for the station is Wil-Freds, Inc., 
and the contractor for the access facilities is DiPaoli/Rosetti 
Construction Company. 

Police Superintendent Richard Brzeczek, Public Works 
Commissioner Jerome Butler, and Chicago Transit Authori- 
ty Chairman Michael Cardilli were among other officials 
who attended dedication ceremonies honoring the two slain 
officers. 



From the Chairrnan 

Ringing in the new 



As we approach 1983, I view the coming year with op- 
timism for the future of public transit in Chicago and our 
ability to serve the needs of the riding public. This issue of 
Transit News reports several developments which cast a 
favorable light on CTA's future. 

On December 12, Mayor Byrne presided at dedication 
ceremonies of the reopened Jackson Park elevated branch. 
We are proud to once again provide rapid transit service to 
this vital area of the City of Chicago. More importantly, we 
look forward to cooperating with the City and neighborhood 
organizations in the economic redevelopment of this area by 
establishing terminal operations at University Avenue with 
corresponding bus service. Improved transit service in this 
area, designed to meet the needs of the people, will be one 
of the greatest contributions to its improved economic and 
residential environment. 

The recent dedications of the Harlem-O'Brien, 
Cumberland-Doyle, and River Road-Darcy rapid transit sta- 
tions on the O'Hare Extension, herald the impending com- 
pletion of this major transit improvement for the City of 
Chicago. When the O'Hare Extension begins operating to 
River Road in February, it will provide much more con- 
venient and efficient service for northwest Chicago and 
suburbs, and when the final portion of the Extension to the 
subway terminal at O'Hare International Airport is com- 
pleted this summer, it will provide a vital link between the 
City and the airport. This will enhance the economic en- 
vironment of the entire metropolitan area by providing bet- 
ter service for air travelers and, most importantly, by pro- 
viding a better means of commuting to and from jobs in the 
Central Business District and the rapidly-growing industrial 
and commercial areas in northwestern Chicago and 
suburbs. 

In 1983, we will once again be expected to demonstrate 
fiscal responsibility by providing efficient and comprehensive 
transit service while keeping operating costs down. Only by 
adhering to our budget, and by using proven management 
techniques to insure that every employee performs his or 
her job in the best possible manner, will we demonstrate to 
the public, and to the legislators who provide our very- 
much-needed funding, that we are providing a level of ser- 
vice and operating efficiency that deserves to be supported 
by the tax-payers' money. 

The important contribution of transit service to Chicago's 
economic environment and the need for improvement and 
expansion must be communicated to the legislators who 
control our funding. While 1 appreciate the support that 
CTA has received from business, civic, and neighborhood 
organizations in this regard, 1 must also stress the important 
contribution that can be made by individual citizens who 
help to communicate this need to our legislators. I therefore 
urge each and every one of you to write to your state 
senators and your state representatives, urging them to sup- 
port legislation that would provide additional funding for 
public transit. It is only through the action of your legislators 
that CTA will be able to receive appropriate funding to 
maintain current service levels and expand our operations to 
serve the needs of our riding public, without resorting to fare 
increases that decrease ridership and result in discontent- 
ment with CTA. 



>^2..>^5<i 



DECEMBER, 1982 



Claims inspection center 
saves time and money 




Maurice Buckley inspects front end damage of a privately owned vehicle at CTA's drive-in 
inspection center, 152 West Illinois Street. 



CTA's drive-in inspection center at 
152 W. Illinois Street has saved 
thousands of vehicle repair dollars and 
expe lited service for claimants in the 
last three years. 

S'lnre 1979, the Claims Department 
has operated the inspection center at 
the Illinois Garage each Tuesday. 
Wednesday, and Thursday from 8 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Motorists whose private vehicles 
have been damaged as a result of ac- 
cidents with CTA buses or other 
equipment may now have their 
vehicles professionally inspected by 
CTA claims representatives who are 
able to satisfy their claims immediate- 
ly. Inspections are done on appoint- 
ment basis only, according to Donald 
Werdell, Director, Claims Operations. 

Werdell said the center saves 
motorists the further inconvenience of 
getting a second estimate on damages 
incurred in a collision. CTA claims 
representatives are professionally 
trained at Vale Technical Institute of 
Chambersburg, Pa., where they must 



attend three weeks of instruction in 
every aspect of estimating damage 
costs. The school is recognized by the 
insurance industry and is supported by 
the industry throughout the United 
States and Canada. 

Students are required to have a 
minimum grade point average of 85 
per cent in order to receive a certificate 
of training from Vale Institute, said 
Werdell, who also holds a Vale cer- 
tificate of training. 

Claims representatives who hold 
certificates of training from the school 
are: Lavance Ashley, Don Burton, 
Jack Chunowitz, Roy Jackson, 
George Kahlfeldt, Tom McCue, Don 
O'Sullivan, Al Porter. Tony 
Retrovato, John Smith, Tom Stepp, 
Bill Uhl, Cecil Mimms, Charles 
Olcikas, and Richard Smith. Tim 
O'Rourke and Ray Tieri received in- 
house property damage training. 

Leon Wool is Claims Department 
Manager. Claims Supervisors are 
Larry Grey, Dan Martorelli, and 
Michael Vitale. 



Law for today 

Q. May a political group organize 
a boycott of merchants if the 
campaign is designed to bring 
about political, social or 
economic change? 

A. Yes. In a case decided earlier this 
year, the Supreme Court held that 
while states have broad powers to 
regulate economic activities, states 
may not prohibit peaceful political 
activity such as the boycotts in this 
case. 

--Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. I want to sell my house. I have 
contacted a number of local 
real estate brokers and they all 
seem to charge the same com- 
mission. Isn't this illegal 
under federal antitrust laws? 

A. No. Unless there is an agreement 
or conspiracy among several 
brokers to charge identical com- 
missions. Thus, if the brokers in 
your area charge identical rates by 
custom or coincidence, there is no 
illegal activity. However, if they 
have reached an express or im- 
plied agreement to do this, there is 
a possible antitrust violation. 

-Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. May a retail store give a dis- 
count to a company buying a 
large number of products and 
deny the discount on a small 
scale? 

A. Yes. Although price discrimination 
is generally prohibited by federal 
law, volume discounts are per- 
missible under the antitrust laws if 
such discounts are economically 
justified. 

-Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. Does the concept of marital 
property in Illinois entitle 
each spouse to 50 percent of 
what was acquired during the 
marriage? 

A. No. Illinois is not a community 
property state where each spouse 
automatically gets one-half of the 
property. The division of what was 
acquired during the marriage takes 
into account the earnings of each 
spouse, non-monetary contribu- 
tions during the marriage, length of 
the marriage and many other fac- 

-Illinois State Bar Association 
Submit questions to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 

Illinois Bar Center 

Springfield. IL 62701 
(Answers may appear in columns. 
Personal answers not possible.) 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Snow equipment is ready for winter's challenge 



Just like the season itself, getting 
ready for winter's snow is becoming an 
annual event at CTA aimed at ensur- 
ing that the system is prepared for 
whatever challenges the weatherman 
has to offer. 

CTA's Fourth Annual Snow Drill 
and Practice Alert provided yet 
another opportunity to call out the 
troops and test the heavy equipment 
in its snow-fighting arsenal. In line with 
tradition, the snow drill came the day 
after Thanksgiving. 

From the first simulated weather 
alert from meteorologists Murray & 
Trettel at 10 a.m. until the all-clear 
sounded at 2;30 p.m.. Operations 
Division personnel were in action 
passing mock orders from the Control 
Center, operating snow-fighting 
equipment along rapid transit routes, 
or testing platform speakers to 
demonstrate how they would keep 
riders informed about severe weather- 
related delays. 





Area Superintendent Lester Racker (left) explains Control Center procedures during snow 
drill to Channel 32 reporter Gail Streetco, accompanied by Mike Horowitz, Group 
Manager, Public Affairs/Consumer Services, as technician Frank Accardi records 
remarks. Behind them (center) is Harry Horn, assistant superintendent, Control Center. 



One of three yellow-painted Snowflghter trains called into service during the snow drill is 
shown northbound on Wells approaching the Randolph/Wells station on the Inner Loop. 
The diesel-powered S-500 Snow Remover Vehicle also made a practice run. 



Besides giving personnel and equip- 
ment a chance to go through their 
paces, the snow alert has also become 
a media event. Television camera 
crews and reporters flocked to CTA's 
main battle station in the Control 
Center to focus on the drama created 
by Operations scriptwriters. 

There they recorded an- 
nouncements of each simulated 
worsening of weather conditions and 
noted the actions taken by CTA per- 
sonnel - up to and including Chair- 
man Cardilli himself -- in response. 

Outside, on the rapid transit system, 
they photographed or rode on yellow- 
painted Snowfighter trains or on 
CTA's ultimate weapon -- the diesel- 
powered S-500 Snow Remover Vehi- 
cle, with its massive snow blowers and 
rotating brooms. 

When it was all over, the cumulative 
experience of another practice alert 
moved CTA ever closer to perfecting a 
technique that promises to call Old 
Man Winter's bluff, no matter how 
hard he blows. 



DECEMBER, 1982 



ZAP Awards 



Print and Upholstery Bus Shop workers completed four 
quarters in a row without an injury. The quarterly Zero Acci- 
dent Program honored the two South Shops units for hav- 
ing clean records stretching from the fourth quarter of 1981 
to the third quarter of 1982. 

The two units were among 10 of 18 areas in the Bus 
Shops to be ZAP winners. 



The Skokie Paint Shop and Degreasing Area in the Rail 
Vehicle Repair Shop also completed four consecutive 
quarters without an accident. The two units are among five 
of 13 areas having no injuries and receiving ZAP awards. 

ZAP awards for Rail Vehicle Maintenance were presented 
to Kimball, Harlem, Desplaines/Foster, and 61st/Racine 
terminals. The Vehicle Maintenance crew at 69th Street 
garage was the first-place winner among the garages. 



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George Millonas, Manager, Equipment Engineering & 
Maintenance Department, congratulates Repairer James Buford, 
61st Street rail terminal for the ZAP award won by him and his 
fellow workers. 



Day Foreman John Antonucci, Desplaines/Foster terminals, Rail 
Maintenance Section, shows the ZAP award employees won for 
first-place award in third quarter competition in 1982. 




Repairman Jesus Montalvo displays the ZAP award he and fellow 
Kimball Rail Maintenance employees won for having no injuries in 
the third quarter of 1982. 



Day Foreman Joe Labellarte (left), Harlem terminal's Rail 
Maintenance Shop, accepts ZAP award from Superintendent 
Richard Lorimer. Harlem Maintenance Shop employees received 
the award for having no injuries in the third quarter of 1982. 




James Blaa (left), Acting General Operations Manager, was 
present when 1 1 Bus Shops foremen received ZAP awards for the 
third quarter of 1982. They are (standing) Jerry Walters, Engine 
Rebuild; Ray Hagen, Vehicle Wiring; Robert Mandujant, 
Upholstery; Ralph Keane, Utility; Ed Meskimen, Print Shop, and 
Nick Simonetti, Unit Rebuild. In the front row are Winmon Lewis 
(left). Paint Shop; Ernest Johnson, Machine Shop; John Dopak, 
Radiator Shop, and Ray Klaub, Sheet Metal Shop. Print Shop and 
Upholstery Shop employees completed four quarters in a row 
without an accident. 



Five Skokie Shop foremen display their areas' ZAP awards. They 
are (from left) Martin Venticlnque, Degreasing; Frank Porcaro, 
Sub-mechanical; Jan Broda, Paint; Ken Blocker, Black- 
smith/Welding, and Bob Buerger, Carpentry. Present at the 
awards ceremony were George Haenisch (second from left), 
Skokie Shop Superintendent; George Millonas (fourth from left). 
Manager, Equipment Engineering and Maintenance Department; 
George Wylie (sixth from right). Acting Unit Supervisory James 
Blaa (second from right). Acting General Operations Manager, 
and James Dudley (right). Supervisor, Safety, who presented 
department awards. 



CIA TRANSIT NEWS 



Public Safety Awards 




Harry Reddrick (left), Acting Manager of Transportation, observes as Tom Boyle, tUlanager 
of Safety, presents the Quarterly Interstation Safety Plaque to Burnett Henderson 
(center), Superintendent, Beverly Garage. 



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Beverly Garage was first-place win- 
ner in the 1982 Third Quarter Public 
Safety contest. It was the 18th time the 
south side garage has taken PSA first- 
place honors since the inception of the 
awards in 1961. 

In its latest Interstation Safety con- 
test success, Beverly distinguished 
itself with a traffic rate of 4.08 ac- 
cidents per 100,000 miles, 22 per cent 
better than the system rate of 5.24. 
The garage had 57 accident-free days 
for the Third Quarter. 

Beverly also claimed a passenger 
rate of 0.34. In other words, for every 
300,000 miles of operation, the 
garage personnel were involved in on- 
ly one accident. The rate was 70 per 
cent better than the Bus System rate of 
1.12 accidents per 100,000 miles. 

Taking Public Safety honors for rail 
service was Kimball Terminal. Kimball 
operated with a combined traffic and 
passenger frequency rate of 0.385 ac- 
cidents per 100,000 miles, or one ac- 
cident for every 300,000 miles of 
operation. The terminal experienced 
88 accident-free days during the 
quarter. 



'Media in education' 
panelist 




Bill Moser (left). Area Superintendent, Far North, and William Rooney, Assistant 
Superintendent, Kimball Terminal, accept Interstation Safety Plaque from Ed Henry 
(right), Supervisor, Safety Performance Analysis, who made the presentation on behalf of 
Safety Manager Tom Boyle. 



CTA Librarian Violette Brooks 
was a panelist at last month's 
Illinois Association for Media in 
Education luncheon at Don 
Roth's Blackhawk Restaurant 
where special interest librarians 
were featured. Topic for discus- 
sion was "Everything You've 
Always Wanted to Know About 
(Some) Special Libraries in 
Chicago." Other panelists 
represented the Museum of 
Science and Industry, the 
Chicago Historical Society, and 
the Municipal Reference Library. 



DECEMBER, 1982 



Employees 
document 
Toronto visit 




When Amtrak International left Chicago's Union Station 
on its 11 -hour inaugural run to Toronto the morning of Oc- 
tober 31. its passengers included four CTA associates. 

Coordinators Mike Cramer and Steve Hastalis of the 
Customer Assistance Section. Ron Weslow, Communica- 
tions Coordinator, and Dave Bollinger, a former CTA sum- 
mer intern, had each paid $96 for the round trip fare aboard 
an excursion Amtrak coach to Canada's Queen Citi/. 

Cramer kept a log and brought along a camera to docu- 
ment the visit. Here are excerpts from his report: 

Tuesday (Nov. 2)--mild, rainy weather in Toronto. We 
spent the morning with Tom Henry, staffer of GO Transit, 
agency name for the Government of Ontario Transit, 
operator of various suburban bus lines and suburban com- 
muter train routes serving Toronto. Henry gave us a run- 
down of his agency's operations (similar to the RTA's). 

Next stop on Tuesday was the headquarters of the Toron- 
to Transit Commission (TTC) and William Hayward, 
marketing and community relations officer. Hayward gave 
us :i detailed description of his agency's operations that are 
similar to those of the CTA. 

TTC has 8,000 employees. The Commission operates a 
fleet composed of 1,403 motor buses, 151 trolley buses, 
476 streetcars, and 632 subway trains. Motor buses operate 
on 108 routes of 651 miles; trolley buses have eight lines 
running on 33.7 miles; nine streetcar routes run over 45.5 
miles of track, and subway trains have two routes (east-west 
and north-south) totaling 33.8 miles. 

Part of Toronto's bus fleet includes those built by Flyer In- 
dustries, Ltd. of Winnipeg, similar to the 200 standard-size 
40-foot buses ordered by the CTA Board August 23. This 
order, totaling $25.2 million, will begin arriving at CTA next 
June, and the delivery is to be completed by October, 1983. 
We rode the Toronto Flyer buses and gave them high marks 
for access and comfort. 

Hayward surprised us with TTC's ridership figures for 
1980 and 1981. In 1980, TTC carried 366.4 million riders; 
in 1981 TTC carried 392 million riders, a 25.6 million in- 
crease in ridership. 

Fares are 75 cents exact change for adults; 25 cents for 
children two to 12; students pay 40 cents, and senior 
citizens ride at reduced fares with TTC I.D. cards. Riding 
tickets and tokens are sold at reduced rates. There is also a 
monthly Metropass good for unlimited riding which has a 
transferable color photo of the card holder and costs $32.50 



a month. A Sunday or holiday family pass for up to four 
persons sells for $2.25. 

Hayward noted that vandalism is not restricted to U.S. 
transit properties. Vandalism costs the TTC about $200,000 
a year. 

Wednesday (Nov. 3)-still mild and wet, so we spent most 
of our time riding the various routes throughout Toronto. 
We also were invited to ride TTC's experimental streetcar, 
an articulated streetcar, a General Motors of Canada ar- 
ticulated bus, and the subway routes. 

Toronto's public transit system makes it very easy for the 
first time visitor to get around in this vibrant "Chicago of the 
North," as some call Toronto. Where Chicago faces east to 
Lake Michigan, Toronto faces south to Lake Ontario. 

When we boarded the train for the return trip, we dis- 
cussed plans for a future visit to Toronto, that friendly, 
foreign city. 




Dave Bollinger enjoyed his ride on a Toronto subway train. Trains 
have barriers betwieen cars to prevent persons entering or leaving 
trains from connecting doors. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




TTC streetcars on Toronto's eight 
lines include modern light rail 
vehicles (left) and PCC streetcars 
(right) similar to those used in 
Chicago until 1958. 



Toronto trip by 
Amtrak: economical 
and enjoyable 

For people who enjoy riding trains, 
for "white knuckle" jet plane 
passengers not pressed for time, and 
for those going to Toronto on business 
or vacation, the $96 round trip excur- 
sion fare on Amtrak's International 
Limited train connecting Chicago and 
Toronto may be just the ticket. 

So said Mike Cramer, CTA 
Customer Assistance Section Coor- 
dinator. 

"The International Limited is a chair 
car train, there are no Pullman 
sleepers, and each car has 84 seats. 
There is no dining car, but the train 
has a snack/lounge car where sand- 
wiches, snack foods, soft drinks, beer, 
wine, and mixed drinks are served. 
Prices are comparable to those in good 
restaurants. 

"The train leaves Chicago's Union 
Station at 10;25 a.m. and makes a 
stop at Hammond, Ind., six stops in 
Michigan, and three stops in Ontario 
before arriving in Toronto 11 hours 
later at 9;50 p.m." 

Cramer said the longest Toronto 
bound and Chicago bound stops were 
for customs inspections at Sarnia, On- 
tario (northbound) and Port Huron, 
Mich, (southbound). These stops 
totalled about 30 minutes each. 

Both Amtrak and Via Rail Canada 
cars (Canadian equivalent to Amtrak) 
use comfortable riding cars. The 495 
miles of track and roadbed are in ex- 
cellent condition. 




Mike Cramer, Customer Assistance Coordinator, rode Toronto bus built by Flyer In- 
dustries, Ltd., similar to 200 buses on order for CTA. 



He said the train got up to speeds of 
80 to 90 m.p.h. as it raced across 
Central Michigan and Southern On- 
tario. 

Many riders in Cramer's Amtrak car 
elected to bring their food and drinks 
to their seats, which are equipped with 
fold-away tables. Canadian cars on 
the train do not have folding tables. 
Other riders eat their food in the 
lounge car's booths to watch the pass- 
ing farm and urban scenes. 

This train, he pointed out, is a non- 
reservation train, and he said prospec- 



tive riders should contact Amtrak to 
get specific information. 

The International Limited route was 
created through the efforts of Amtrak, 
Via Rail Canada, the Michigan 
Department of Transportation, and 
the Ontario Provincial government as 
a result of intensive lobbying by 
organizations and individuals. They 
wanted Chicago to Toronto rail service 
restored after it was dropped in 1970. 

Another plus for this new service: 
Toronto's Union Station contains a 
station for Toronto's subway system. 



DECEMBER, 1982 



George Gray (Archer garage) 
is appreciated by Lillian Piatt, 
of West 56th Place, who fre- 
quently rides his No. 62 Ar- 
cher Express bus. "He makes 
it a pleasure to ride, no mat- 
ter how jammed we are. He 
has a beautiful personality, is 
always cheerful. He thanks 
us for moving to the rear of 
the bus; thanks anyone who 
relinquishes a seat for a han- 
dicapped person. I could go 
on and on about this man 
who loves mankind; he Is tru- 
ly a blessing to us, and the 
CTA can be proud of him as a 
representative. His gracious 
manner is something to 
remember, and I'm sure it 
puts everyone In a good 
mood." 




June Martin (West Section) 
was complimented by Fran- 
cis Kent, of Roscoe Street, 
who passes through her 
agent's booth at Desplaines 
on the Congress line. "This 
lady is efficient, fast, and 
above all an outstanding 
employee. She has poise, 
charm, and Is extremely 
courteous to each and every 
rider she comes in contact 
with. She is an example of 
how people who work with 
the public should be, and 
they in turn will get the same 
treatment. It is very difficult 
sometimes working with the 
public, but I have never heard 
anyone be rude toward this 
lady, and they have no reason 
to be." 



Lawrence Watts (69th Street garage) was called a 
"wonderful driver" by June McWilliams, of West 65th 
Street, who was a rider on his 71st Street bus. "He is very 
courteous and knowledgeable. He calls the stops out loudly 
and clearly, and answeres any question the best he can. He 
knows the street and can maneuver his bus without un- 
necessary bumps and jerks. On the day 1 rode with him I 
had my two small children and some packages. He waited 
patiently while 1 boarded and found a seat, and again later 
when 1 exited." 

Geraldine Armstrong (Lawndale garage) and Carmen 
Betances (North Park garage) "added the perfect touch" to 
a weekend Mary Giller and a friend from Richfield, Min- 
nesota, spent in Chicago. "After attending a concert at the 
Pavilion on Harrison and Racine, we caught a No. 60 bus, 
except in the wrong direction. It was about 1:30 a.m. when 
a woman bus driver (Armstrong) got us going in the right 
direction. She informed us what we did wrong and advised 
us to ask questions from now on if we didn't know where we 
were going. After we got off to transfer at Michigan Avenue, 
a No. 151 bus pulled up and the driver (Betances) asked, 
'Are you the little lost souls I'm supposed to pick up?' We 
couldn't believe it! She then got us to the Marriott. We've 
never been to Chicago before, and expected quite the op- 
posite kind of people. The entire weekend was one of learn- 
ing not to judge others you don't know. Thanks again for 
the wonderful service." 

James Miller (Beverly garage) was thanked by Harr^ Ten- 
nison, of West 79th Street, for his "superb service" as 
operator of a No. 49A South Western bus. "I had occasion 
to ride with this excellent driver on three trips. His demeanor 
never varied for an instant. On each ride he was courteous, 
kind, helpful, exceptionally patient and considerate. He had 
all of the passengers in a pleasant, convivial mood. Never 
ceased being congenial and cheerful. With all of these vir- 
tues going for him, another plus is that his driving skill is ex- 
cellent. No sudden jerky stops and starts, but just a pleasing, 
smooth ride." 



Ernestine McWilliams (North Section) and Fred Zim- 
merman (Rail District North) were praised by Jack Stewart, 
of Kenilworth, for their "courteous and helpful service" at 
the Linden terminal. "The red light was on, indicating the 
parking lot was full. I noticed there was space reserved for 
handicapped people. I am a senior citizen with very painful 
osteoarthritis. I left my car and explained my predicament to 
Ms. McWilliams, the agent. She called Mr. Zimmerman, the 
supervisor, and before I could get back to my car, he was 
there. He released the gate, and I quickly found a parking 
place and proceeded downtown. I was back in Wilmette by 
11:45. Quick, easy, and met two wonderful CTA 
employees." 

David Keske (Forest Glen garage) was applauded in a let- 
ter signed by Marion Nelson and nine other riders who 
board his No. 69 Cumberland Express bus on Higgins 
Road. "As he picks us up, his friendly way of greeting and 
chatting with us puts us all in good spirits and makes the trip 
home from work a pleasant ride in spite of bad weather or 
bad traffic conditions. Because of his kind and pleasant way, 
he makes all of us feel friendly and open with each other, so 
that the ride home is like a daily meeting of old friends. He 
helps make the end of the day just a little nicer for having 
ridden on his bus." 

Eddie Sanders (West Section) an agent at Halsted on the 
Congress line, impressed Willard Puffer, of Lunt Avenue, 
with her dedicated service. "When I arrived home and 
found my wallet missing, I vowed I would never step onto a 
CTA train or bus again. However, I had not been home long 
before a CTA official called to tell me my wallet had been 
recovered and turned in by Ms. Sanders. Thanks to her 
prompt action, I got my wallet back without a cent missing. 
And guess what? I am still riding the CTA, hoping to meet 
more employees like Ms. Sanders, not only friendly and 
cheerful, but truly concerned about the welfare of riders." 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Four employees honored 
for outstanding service 




Jerome Smith 



Leonard Morris 



Foster IVIoore 



Lawrence Latham 



A knife wielding passenger aboard an eastbound Stony 
Island bus was subdued by Bus Operators Jerome Smith, 
Leonard Morris, and two passengers on Smith's bus. 

Operator Smith said as the man boarded he refused to 
pay a fare. Instead, when the fare was requested he stuck a 
knife in the fare box slot and told Smith that he would collect 
the money from the next person who boarded. 

A scuffle ensued as the man went after Operator Smith 
with the knife. Meanwhile, the bus was already in motion. 
During this development Morris, who was westbound on 
Stony Island, arrived on the scene and witnessed the alter- 
cation. 

Morris stopped his bus, boarded Smith's vehicle and 



stopped it. He was assisted by two passengers in subduing 
the knifeman. Morris radioed for police and Smith signed a 
complaint. Both operators received special recognition cer- 
tificates for outstanding performance of duty which were 
signed by Acting General Operations Manager James Blaa. 

Certificates of special recognition were also awarded to 
Motorman Foster Moore, and Conductor Lawrence Latham 
who led riders of their North-South line train to safety after 
they discovered a fire in the head car as the train ap- 
proached 633 North State Street in the subway. 

Moore and Latham escorted their passengers as they 
evacuated them along 200 feet of a catwalk through dense 
smoke which had filled the tunnel. 



Thanks— for a 
job well done 



Maria Acevedo, North Section 
Jose Almeida, Forest Glen 
Francisco Aragon, North Park 

Willie Baker, North Avenue 

Lerline Ball, 77th Street 

Jose Batista, Limits 

William Blackwell Jr., North Park 

Toni Blair, North Avenue 

Frederick Burks, 77th Street 

Victor Davila, North Park 
Curtis Davis, Forest Glen 
Vincent Dawson, North Avenue 
John DeGroat, 77th Street 
Marcos Delgado, North Avenue 
Herbert Dillard, Ashland Term. 

Bruce Ellison, Limits 
Willie Esper, Beverly 



Constantino Estrada, Archer 
George Ewing, Lawndale 

Edward Gonzalez, Archer 
Rose Goody, North Park 

Earl Harrington, North Avenue 
Wally Henry, Archer 

Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Willie James, North Park 
Robert Jenkins Jr., North Park 

Robert Lawson, North Park 
Alfred Lee, Limits 
John Lemond, North Park 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Jesus Limas, North Park 
Ruben Lopez, North Park 
Robert Lucas, Lawndale 

Adolph Marth, Forest Glen 
Augustin Mercado, Forest Glen 
Earl Miles, Lawndale 
Lura Minter, North Avenue 

Robert Nelson, Forest Park 



Fred Plambek, District D 
Davis Price, Howard/Kimball 

George Raniszewski, Forest Glen 
Anastacio Reyes, North Avenue 
Vernon Robinson, Howard/Kim- 
ball 

Ramon Rodriguez, North Park 
Angel Roman, Forest Glen 
Oliver Roque Jr., Forest Glen 

Ivadel Sandoval, North Park 
Mary Schmidtke, Forest Glen 
Blanche Silva, North Park 
Robert Smith, Forest Glen 
Carl Strickland, 77th Street 

George Thompson, Archer 

Arturo Valdez, North Park 
Paul Vance Jr., Forest Glen 

Javid Wasson, North Park 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 
Thelma Young, Forest Glen 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 



DECEMBER, 1982 



Culture bus guides are special people 




Volunteer commentators received certificates of appreciation from Mike IHorowitz (standing right center witli light tie) at a Board Room 
ceremony December 1 attended by Herbert Boyd (far left) and Everett McBride (second from right), Central District supervisors; Mike 
Cramer, Customer Assistance coordinator, and Ron Weslow, Communications coordinator (second and third from left); Jim Mulqueeny, 
Routes & Systems planner (center), and Jeff Stern. 

"It's more than transportation" 
might be a good motto for CTA's 
Culture Bus service, and the people 
who make it something special are the 
commentators. 

They're the volunteer guides who 
tell riders historic and other informa- 
tion about points of interest along the 
three Culture Bus routes. 

Speaking through a public address 
system behind the operator's position 
on each of the articulated buses used 
for the service, commentators keep 
riders informed about what they're 
seeing with the aid of scripts prepared 
by the Public Affairs Department. 

It's a personal touch that pays off in 
increased rider interest and greater ap- 
preciation for CTA, the city, and 
Chicago's cultural heritage among 
natives and visitors alike. 

Final figures showed that 55,067 
rides were taken on Culture Buses 
during the 23 Sundays and holidays of 
the 1982 season, or 32 percent more 
than the comparable period of 1981. 
While new stops on the expanded 
North and West routes certainly ac- 
Mike Horowitz (center). Group Manager, Public Affairs/Consumer Services, and Jeff Stern counted for some of the increased 

(right). Culture Bus coordinator, presented Michael Simmons with a poster of Chicago in ridership by listening to many of the 

?„oo^^",°"°L*''^ record 21 days of service as a volunteer commentator during the 23-day ^.^ ^^\^^ completed their trips at 

1982 Culture Bus season. y t- 




12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



special Service 
Culture Bus 
operator is lauded 
by riders 

Riders of CTA's first Culture Bus 
service for the mobility limited showed 
their appreciation for one of their 
favorite bus operators November 24 at 
a luncheon at the Museum of Science 
& Industry -- the city's most popular 
cultural attraction. 

James Briley, a 22-year CTA 
veteran who has been with Special 
Services since the unit was organized 
in 1981, was recommended for 
recognition by Eva Pereira, of West 
38th Street. Pereira, a sprightly oc- 
togenarian who has difficulty walking, 
rode with Briley on many of the eight 
Culture Bus trips offered by Special 
Services during the 1982 season. 

Pereira wrote Mayor Byrne to say 
she liked the service so much that she 
planned to honor Briley, and was go- 
ing to ask her fellow riders to con- 
tribute 25 cents each toward a coffee 
party in her home. 

In response the Mayor said she 
would be happy to offer her support 
by organizing a luncheon at the 
museum. The Mayor's office con- 




Mayor Byrne's Appointment Secretary Mrs. Helen McNamara (left) extends a hand to Eva 
Pereira at a luncheon honoring Special Services Operator James Briley (center). 



tacted Special Services Project 
Manager Isaac Beal to invite 50 other 
handicapped riders to the luncheon, 
which would be held on Ms. Pereira's 
83rd birthday. 

Culture Bus coordinators Jeff Stern 
and Ron Weslow, from the Public Af- 
fairs Office, represented Mike 
Horowitz, Group Manager, Public Af- 
fairs/Consumer Services, at the party, 
which was also attended by volunteer 
commentators Richard Kunz and Jack 
Pearson. 

Mrs. Helen McNamara, Mayor 



Byrne's Appointment Secretary, was 
there on behalf of the Mayor and ar- 
ranged a big birthday cake surprise for 
Ms. Pereira. 

Briley, who was accompanied by his 
wife and daughter and Sam Thomas, 
another Special Services Culture Bus 
operator, said, "The Culture Bus 
brought enjoyment to people, and that 
made it a gratifying experience for me. 
When you get into this program, you 
realize that what these people really 
want is independence, and we're the 
ones who can provide it." 



the Art Institute you would have to 
conclude that the commentators also 
had a geat deal to do with it. 

Commentators have been a part of 
the service since its inception in 1977, 
when there was only one route. In the 
beginning, the commentators were all 
CTA personnel, mainly from the 
Public Affairs Department. 

As the service was expanded to in- 
clude a North and then a West route, 
however, staffing requirements 
became so great that other sources 
had to be found to make sure a com- 
mentator would be available for each 
run. 

Students from universities along 
Culture Bus routes were asked to ap- 
ply, particularly those interested in 
public speaking. In time, CTA at- 
tracted not only students, but profes- 
sionals and others who enjoyed work- 
ing with the public and who recog- 
nized the value of the Culture Bus as a 



means of creating a more positive im- 
age of the city. 

At a gathering of the volunteer com- 
mentators on December 1, reflections 
by the individuals themselves best ex- 
plained their involvement in the ser- 
vice. 

Mike Simmons, a student at Robert 
Morris College, said, "I like meeting 
the different types of people who ride 
the Culture Bus, and helping those 
who are new in town. I got used to ap- 
pearing in public when 1 sang for nine 
years with the Chicago Children's 
Choir. That also gave me good prac- 
tice using my voice for long periods of 
time while standing on my feet." 

Nina Wendt, who was recently a 
librarian for a Loop law firm, said, "I 
moved to Chicago from South 
Carolina about two years ago, and I 
enjoy working on the Culture Bus 
because it helps me learn about the 
city. It's also made me less afraid to be 



in front of a microphone." 

Louise Sibley is an administrator at 
Cook County Hospital's Department 
of Nursing. She volunteered two years 
ago to become a commentator 
because "I love people -- love to do 
things that please people. I also like 
the gratitude I get from the riders. 
They seem to enjoy the commentary, 
and the fact that I can deliver it in such 
a way that they appreciate it makes me 
feel good." 

Mark Thacher, a salesman and in- 
vestment counselor, has been a 
lifelong resident of Chicago and a 
commentator since 1980. "I already 
knew the city fairly well," he said, 
"and had read a lot about its architec- 
ture. I was used to public speaking 
from my college days, and later on 
when I was raising funds for the col- 
lege. I like telling people about 
Chicago and its architectural 
treasures." 



DECEMBER, 1982 



13 



You should know when 
to call Social Security 



The first time you contact Social 
Security is usually when you want to 
apply for a Social Security number. At 
that time, you will need proof of age, 
identity, and citizenship or immigrant 
status, if you are 18 or older, you must 
apply in person. Other times when 
Social Security should be contact are: 

- When a person becomes disabled, 
in order to find out if disability 
benefits may be received. 

- To inquire about survivor benefits 
when a family member dies. 

- When a widow or widower 
reaches age 60. 



To apply for retirement benefits at 
age 62 or later. 

It is best to apply about three 
months before retirement so that your 
Social Security checks can start as 
soon as possible after you stop work- 
ing, thus avoiding an income break. A 
delay in applying could result in more 
serious penalties including a perma- 
nent loss of benefits. 

Before applying for Social Security 
benefits, be sure you have the follow- 
ing information and documents to 
support your claim: 

1. Social Security card or record of 



the number. 
2. Proof of age. An official, or 
religious record of birth or bap- 
tism, preferably one recorded 
before age 5. Only original 
records or copies certified by the 
issuing agency may be used. If 
such records are not available, 
check with the nearest Social 
Security office regarding subse- 
quent proof. 
Two or three months before you 
reach age 65, you should contact 
Social Security to arrange for 
Medicare health insurance protection, 
even if there are no plans for retire- 
ment. 

Should you have any questions 
regarding your benefits, you should 
contact the nearest Social Security of- 
fice. 



Employees asked 
to pledge 
'a fair share' 

It takes so little to make a Fair Share 
pledge, but it helps so many. In fact, 
more than 300 United Fund health 
care agencies in Chicagoland benefit 
from the Crusade of Mercy. 

Last year CTA employees pledged 
more than $125,000 to the Crusade 
to help support the vital health care 
programs and other human service 
agencies which emphasize individual 
community spirit. 

This year, CTA employees are be- 
ing asked once again to give to the 
Crusade of Mercy to help friends, 
neighbors, and sometimes co-workers 
or loved ones, who, in moments of 
crises, rely on the spirit of human kind 
to help the less fortunate. 

Customarily, one day's pay a year, 
which roughly equals four tenths of 
one per cent," is considered the Fair 
Share pledge which provides valuable 
assistance in time of need for so many. 

This year, let's make the United 
Way the CTA way by joining the 
Crusade of Mercy. Every pledge will 
help provide the services which will 
make someone's dreams come true, 
perhaps someone close to us. 

Let us begin the holiday spirit and 
the new year by investing in the 
Crusade of Mercy. 



Controller Chambers 
joins pensioners 
after 34 yecirs 

Jack Chambers, 64, a bus controller 
since 1971 in the Transportation 
department's Control Center, went 
"10-3" and "10-7" on December 7 
and ended his 34 year career in public 
transit. The radio broadcast code 
"10-3" means Stop Transmitting. The 
radio broadcast code "10-7" means 
Out of Service. 

Many of Chambers' co-workers and 
friends stopped in the Control Center's 
train room to say good-by in an infor- 
mal reception held for him by Jerry 
Johnson, control center superinten- 
dent. 

Chambers is noted for his calm 
broadcast voice and his ability to profi- 
ciently handle emergencies radioed to 
him by bus operators and field super- 
visory personnel. He also has a fine 
sense of humor. 




He began his career in 1948 in the 
Lawndale garage as a bus operator. In 
1961 he was promoted to supervisor 
and 10 years later joined the Control 
Center staff. 

His friends gave him a cash gift and 
a fifth of what he said was 
"mouthwash." 

Chambers and his wife, Eillen, live 
on the southwest side and plan to 
retire to Florida. The couple has two 
sons. 




While buttons were popping for proud Insurance Clerk 
Jim Burklow, an employee of 37 years, on the December 
12 arrival of his first grandchild, this first photo session 
for little Steven James Carline was just another occa- 
sion for the new born to sleep. Born at 1:22 a.m. in Christ 
Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. Tom Carline of Hometown, the 
baby weighed seven pounds, four ounces, and was 20 in- 
ches long at birth. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



I3sr :l^:b:is/lo:ez,t^a^is/l 

GEORGE CHRISTIE, 87. North Section, 

Emp. 4-11-29, Died 10-10-82 
JOHN CLARK, 78. Forest Glen, 

Emp. 9-21-25, Died 10-4-82 
ARTHUR DICKSON, 69, West Section. 

Emp, 1-21-47. Died 10-31-82 
ELISHIE EPLEY. 68. Kedzie, 

Emp. 1-31-47, Died 8-2-82 
WARREN HILL, 87, 61st Street, 

Emp. 11-13-13. Died 9-29-82 
DOUGLAS HORNE, 70, Forest Glen, 

Emp 11-5-53, Died 9-25-82 
JOHN lOVINO, 73, Maintenance, 

Emp. 7-7-42, Died 10-30-82 
MARION JEFFREY, 60, South Section, 

Emp. 10-15-47, Died 3-19-82 
WILLIAM JOHNSTON, 80, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 210-28, Died 10-2-82 
ROBERT LAVIN, 68, Beverly, 

Emp. 5-13-41, Died 10-16-82 
RAYMOND McCarthy, 82, District A, 

Emp. 11-15-26, Died 10-25-82 
HENRY OLWIG, 60, Douglas, 

Emp. 12-29-49, Died 10-18-82 
ANTON POGORZELSKI, 88, West Sect., 

Emp. 6-9-20, Died 10-14-82 
VINCENT RUTKOWSKI, 69, Transp., 

Emp. 11-23-36, Died 10-1-82 
ROBERT SEXTON, 75, Engineering, 

Emp. 2-21-46, Died 10-9-82 
MITAR SHAROVICH, 88, Way & Structs.. 

Emp. 11-1-30, Died 9-28-82 
VINCENT SHUBAT, 78, Engineering, 

Emp. 7-2-29, Died 10-14-82 
HENRY THOMPSON, 92, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 1-29-25, Died 10-29-82 
HENRY WATTERSON. 100, Limits, 

Emp. 1-3-27. Died 10-19-82 



NEW PENSIONERS 



ANNE ANGST, Accts. Pyble. Clk., 

Financial Services, Emp. 2-15-54 
HARRY C^RTER, Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 7-24-51 
HEARTHEL JOHNSON, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 9-6-51 
WILLARD JOYCE, Collector, 

77th Street, Emp. 5-1-47 
OCTAVIA PERRIN, Ticket Agent, 

South Section, Emp. 8-20-55 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 



MARGARET ARCHER, Travel Info. Rep. 

Consumer Services, Emp. 2-18-67 
LAWRENCE GENENDER, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 11-21-64 
•CARL HOWARD, Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp. 10-28-70 
RAY JOHNSON Jr., Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 10-17-66 
•ORA MILLER, Rail Janitor, 

Fac. Maint.. Emp. 2-20-61 
MARY STANCZYK. Ticket Agent, 

West Section. Emp. 5-16-59 
IRMA WESLEY. Operator. 

Limits. Emp. 8-15-74 



•Retroactive to 11-1-82 




Former CTA Signalmen Victor Zastera 
(left) of Lombard, and HerbieTempleman 
of Ava, Mo., got together to reminisce dur- 
ing Zastera's recent visit to ttie "Sfiow 
Me" state. Zastera retired January 1, 1978 
as a signal foreman from Central District. 
Templeman, retired since 1959, claims to 
be the oldest living towerman from the 
Loop. He recently celebrated his 88th 
birthday. 



Raymond A. Hynes of Tamarac, Fla., who 
retired in 1969 as a CTA Office Services 
Supervisor, and his wife, Anna, celebrated 
their 59th wedding anniversary on 
November 19 with a small group of friends 
and relatives at Spoto's Restaurant in 
Seminole, Fla. Mr. and Mrs. Hynes are the 
parents of two children. They also have 15 
grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. 
One grandson, Vincent J. Allen, is a repair- 
man at Archer garage. 



Service 
anniversaries 
in December 

40 YEARS 




Edward Evans 

Maintenance 



35 YEARS 

James Durr, Electrical 
Tliomas Freeman, Instruction 
William Murray, Electrical 
Edward Superczynski, Electrical 

30 YEARS 

Catlierine Corcoran, Treasury 
Wilbert Dofirmann, Forest Glen 
Burnett Henderson, Beverly 
Andrew Jones Jr., Beverly 
William Kelly, Douglas 
Frank Sprovieri, South Shops 
William Whitenhill, Archer 

25 YEARS 

Donald Budoff, Stores 
Donald Burton, Claims 
Lawrence Costley, Forest Glen 
Gerald Doherty, North Park 
Robert English, 77th Street 
Harold Freiwald, Beverly 
Samuel Highsmith Jr., Schedules 
Roy Jones, West Section 
Orvan Lyles, Archer 
Joseph Maloney, Archer 
George O'Donncll, Archer 
Roosevelt Russell, 69th Street 
Willie Shelton. Beverly 
Lawrence Thigpen, North Park 



DECEMBER, 1982 



eta EMPLOYEE COUNSELING PROGRAM 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 

"Goal" 
Keep people working 



ALCOHOLISM 

DRUGS 

FINANCIAL 



'222-6114 
222-6115. 



' LEGAL 
' MARITAL 
• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 



CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



YOUR NAME. 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box . 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mall to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Mercliandise Mart, Chicago, IL 60654. 






you or someone you know will 
look to the United Way for 
help. Services provided by the 
more than 300 United Way 
human care agencies reach 
one in four families in the 
Chicago metropolitan area. 
Please help by giving your 
Fair Sliare. 



aAAi 



.UnibedV\/^y 
Crusade of Mercy 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume35 Number12 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager, 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Production Artist: Alexandra Eiva 
Contributing Writers: Elda Leal. 
Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Seryices Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
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^S=;^^ 7983 Volume 36-Number 1 & 2 

i^ACff Transit News 



Reddrick appointed transportation manager 




Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick (rigtit) explains bus controller operation to Chair- 
man Michael Cardilli as Mrs. Linda J. Hopps, assistant superintendent, controller, monitors 
this operation. 



CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli has 
appointed Harry Reddrick Manager of 
Transportation. The former Director of 
Transportation Personnel replaces 
James Blaa who has been named Spe- 
cial, Assistant to the Executive Director. 

The appointment of Reddrick ac- 
companies an organizational change 
which calls for the Manager of Trans- 
portation to report directly to the Exec- 
utive Director rather than the General 
Operations Manager, a position which 
has been eliminated. 

"This organizational change will 
enable CTA to provide the best possi- 
ble public transportation," said Chair- 
man Cardilli. "It gives the Transporta- 
tion Department top priority in the 
CTA organization, and I am sure Mr. 
Reddrick will address the needs of the 
entire community." 

Reddrick joined CTA in 1950 as a 
streetcar motorman. He moved 
through the ranks of the Transporta- 
tion Department, holding supervisory 
positions in both bus and rail 
operations. 

Prior to this appointment, he was 
Acting Manager of Transportation. 
Other positions besides Director of Bus 
and Rail Personnel have been Bus and 
Rail Area Superintendent, Station 
Superintendent, Station Instructor, 
Bus Instructor, and Bus Supervisor. 



Profile of a manager 

56-year old Harry Reddrick pushed aside the big pile of 
"action required" papers which had accumulated over the 
Christmas holiday weekend and had been stacked neatly 
on his big mahogony desk, to talk about his new job as 
manager of transportation. 

"I haven't really done a lot, but we can talk," said 
Reddrick, a 32-year transportation veteran, who a week 
before had been acting manager of transportation. Now 
the ball was squarely in his court and the natty Mister 
Reddrick, a very personable individual with a flair for 
getting things accomplished without a lot of hullabaloo, 
looked, and felt very comfortable in the role. 

"I'd like to do some interpersonal things in this job- 
perhaps some things we have not done before," he said. 
"I want our people to continue feeling good about them- 



selves, and their jobs," he added. His CTA experience 
has included both surface and rail service. Reddrick's 
years as an instructor, and as a superintendent, coupled 
with a brief stint in 1971 as an employment interviewer, 
more than adequately equip him for his new job. 

Reflecting retrospectively over his CTA service from 
streetcar conductor in 1950, the new manager of trans- 
portation said, "I have never had to reach another plateau 
in order to feel good about myself. 

"1 have always felt comfortable with myself, and in 
whatever I have done. 1 have always believed that I could 
do whatever 1 really put my mind to do." Exemplifying 
Reddrick's attitude and approach to the work ethic is his 
tremendous career track record, the last 11 years of which 
he has spent in management. His most recent job was as 
director of transportation personnel, a position he held 
from November 1976 until his recent appointment. 

(Continued on page 2) 



(continued from page 1) 

Co-workers who remember Reddrick as a superintend- 
ent recognize him as not only having the savvy required 
in his new responsibilities, but regard him as a very fair in- 
dividual in dealing with other people, both subordinates 
and peers. "Harry is a guy with whom you can talk. He's 
a man who will listen," said one assistant superintendent. 

His transportation destiny began with the Santa Fe Rail- 
road where he worked as an oiler and brakeman's helper 
in the Chicago yards. Subsequently, he became a dining 
car waiter for the same line. "1 have served the public 
from Chicago to California." said Reddrick, who recalls 
the day the late actor Gary Cooper helped him move a 



Harty Reddrick, CTA's new 

Transportation Manager— "I have served 

the public from Chicago to California." 



bag of potatoes as Cooper boarded Reddrick's car on the 
great Santa Fe Super Chief, then the train of the stars. 

In 1944. 18-year old Harry Reddrick swapped his rail- 
road uniform for a military olive drab type as he began a 
30-month stint in the U.S. Army-Air Corps. "I was drafted 
during a run to the west coast, and later inducted at Fort 
Sheridan," he recalled. 

The transportation career die already cast, Reddrick 
was assigned to a transportation support unit of the 



1940th Engineer Battalion, and saw service with Occu- 
pational Forces in Japan and elsewhere in the Pacific. 
He was discharged with the rank of technical sergeant. 

A native of Memphis, Tenn., Reddrick had moved to 
Chicago as a teenager, but after leaving the Army he 
returned to Memphis where he attended Lemoyne Col- 
lege. In 1950, he joined CTA. Since then, he has earned 
certificates of training in Industrial Management from 
Northeastern University in Boston, the Executive Develop- 
ment Program at Chicago City College under the auspices 
of the University of Illinois, and Intergovernmental Studies 
at Northwestern University, Evanston campus. 

Close friends maintain that Reddrick is an accomplished 
organist. He will admit only that he enjoys music, bowl- 
ing, and golf. He is a trustee and officer of the Resurrec- 
tion Lutheran Church at 94th and Wentworth where he 
has served for 15 years. In the past, he has served his 
church in the capacity of Sunday School teacher, and 
Cubmaster for its Cub Scout pack. 

"I'm not committed to too many things," said the new 
transportation manager, whose only other memberships 
are the Linksman's Golfing Association and Dorie Miller 
American Legion Post 915 which has a lengthy CTA 
membership, including Chairman Michael Cardilli. 

The transportation chief and Mrs. Sidney Sylvia 
Reddrick, his wife of 34 years, are the proud parents 
of three sons and a daughter. 

Said Reddrick, "I know that I have the full support of 
the chairman and the executive director. I intend to do 
the job needed in my new capacity." 



Adopts new logo 

The Chicago Transit Authority has adopted a new offi- 
cial logo. 

The first publications to use the new logo will be the 
Spring-Summer, 1983 CTA route map, a Service Changes 
Brochure, and other printed materials that will explain new 
or modified route changes in the O'Hare Extension area on 
the Northwest side. 

Further implementation of the new logo will be accom- 
plished gradually as new materials are needed. Present eco- 
nomic conditions prevent widespread production of new 
printed matter, stationery, signs, or vehicle repainting. 

"The logo design symbolizes the new spirit of aggressive 
management at CTA which combines modern management 
techniques with CTA's long-standing tradition of service to 
the community," said Michael N. Horowitz, Group Man- 
ager, Public Affairs/Consumer Services. "It is also a blend 
of the present and the past." 

The new type face, Helvetica Bold Italic, is a more aggres- 
sive variation of the Helvetica Medium type face used in re- 
cent years. It visually suggests a strong sense of purpose 
resulting in action and movement. This effect is intensified 
by the dynamic speedlines that blend with and extend from 
the left side of the type. The new speedlines are a contem- 
porary adaptation of the speedlines used in the original 
CTA logo. 

The new logo will appear in two variations. The first varia- 
tion (shown at top) is designed to bleed off the left edge of 




publications, stationery, signs, etc. The second variation is 
designed as a free-standing logo when a bleed off is not 
practical. 

The new logo was designed by Alexandra Eiva, graphic 
designer/production assistant in the Publications Section of 
the CTA's Public Affairs/Consumer Services department. 
The new northwest area (O'Hare Extension) service changes 
brochure and the Spring-Summer, 1983, CTA route map 
will be the first publications to display the new CTA logo. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Tight '83 budget 
requires hard work, 
increased productivity, 
and cost efficiency. 

A $563.1 million operating budget for 1983 was ap- 
proved by the CTA Board on December 20. This figure in- 
cludes cuts totaling $19.5 million from the amount that had 
been presented to the Board's Finance Committee just a 
short time earlier. 

The cuts were necessitated by the reduced public funding 
level approved by the Regional Transportation Authority in 
its budget, which was adopted on December 16. 

The final CTA figure takes into account anticipated sav- 
ings of $13.3 million in labor costs resulting from the elimi- 
nation of 291 positions. Among these were new positions 
which had been proposed for 1983 and vacancies which 
had occurred during 1982. 

Cuts of $1.9 million in material and supplies along with 
$4.3 million in contractual expenses and outside services 
accounted for the remaining new reductions. 

Changes may still be made to restore some of the cuts if 
the State Legislature acts to provide operating subsidies, 
which the CTA and other RTA-funded transit companies 
have been operating without for more than three years. 

Referring to the economies achieved, Michael Brady, 
chairman of the Board's Subcommittee on Budget, said, 
"These cuts have not come easily. Though we do not an- 
ticipate the need for more layoffs, we have had to eliminate 
most vacancies and deny all requested additional positions 
except those crucial to high-priority operating needs. 

"CTA employees will once again be asked to work harder, 
increase their productivity, and strive for all possible cost- 
economies. " 

Paring almost 300 positions while adding service to 
O'Hare Airport and Special Services operations. Brady said, 
could be accomplished "only by tightening service schedules 
wherever possible, and through continued progress in re- 
ducing employee absenteeism, enforcing disciplinary codes 
and keeping a close rein on extraboard staffing." 

One of the peculiarities involved in planning the 1983 
budget was that an extra week had to be included to keep 
the fiscal year roughly in line with the calendar year. As a 
result of adding this 53rd week to the year, expenses will 
automatically increase by 2 percent over 1982 levels. Also 
figured into the new budget is a projected inflation rate of 
6 percent for labor and most other costs. 

The opening of the O'Hare extension, first to River Road 
and later to the airport terminal, will require extra operating 
expenses, not only for additional manpower and trains, but 
also for maintenance and electric power. Additional Special 
Services buses for the disabled will also be placed in service 
in 1983. 

While these items have been figured into the budget for 
1983, the increased costs they represent have required fur- 
ther belt tightening in other areas to hold down overall costs. 

At the same time, the delivery of 98 of an order of 600 
rapid transit cars from the Budd Company of Philadelphia, 
and the expected arrival of 96 more cars in 1983, will help 
modernize the CTA fleet and reduce service problems asso- 
ciated with older equipment. 

Completion of the delivery of 125 new articulated buses 
and 200 standard buses in 1983 can also be expected to in- 
crease operating efficiency, thereby keeping costs in check. 



From the Chairman 




Chairman Michael Cardilli visited the 69th Street Garage to person- 
ally express his appreciation to employees who moved vehicles and 
other equipment to safety during the January 5 fire at the bus facil- 
ity. During his visit, Cardilli also presented the 1982 Chairman's Cup 
to Bus Operator John Odom, winner of the 1982 Bus Roadeo. Odom 
was also among employees at 69th Street Garage who rushed 
to remove buses from the building. On hand as the veteran bus op- 
erator received the trophy on behalf of 69th Street Garage were 
Thomas Rellly (left), 69th Street Garage superintendent, and Harry 
Reddrick, transportation manager. 



Extremes 



Once again, I am proud to congratulate those of you who 
acted in a manner that demonstrates the true character of 
CTA employees when called upon to respond to a crisis situ- 
ation. During the recent fire at 69th Street garage, several 
Transportation and Maintenance employees received praise 
from the Chicago Fire Department for courageous efforts in 
attempting to contain the fire and move CTA vehicles and 
equipment to safety. Your valiant efforts kept financial losses 
as low as possible and helped avert what might have been a 
major catastrophe. 1 personally thank each of you for your 
courage and dedication. 

I am also pleased to announce in this issue of Transit 
News the appointment of Mr. Harry Reddrick as Manager of 
Transportation. Throughout his fine career at CTA, most 
recently as Director of Transportation Personnel, he has 
demonstrated strong leadership, organizational ability, and 
concern for the welfare of his subordinates. I look forward to 
working with Mr. Reddrick to improve upon the outstanding 
record of public service already established by our Transpor- 
tation Department. 

I must also take this opportunity to congratulate the 
Chicago Police Department, CTA Detail, for their long-term 
and comprehensive investigation of CTA fare handling and 
fare collection procedures. This investigation has resulted in 
the identification of CTA employees who have been abusing 
the system for their own personal gain, and it will lead to im- 
proved fare collection and handling procedures which will 
discourage and prevent such activities in the future. 

In these trying economic times, when CTA has been faced 
with budget cuts and layoffs, all employees suffer when a 
comparative few divert our much-needed operating reve- 
nues for their own personal use. Such dishonest activities 
are most irresponsible when we consider that CTA employ- 
ees receive one of the most generous wage and benefits 
packages in the transit industry. I assure you that we will 
make every effort to see that those employees who abuse 
the system through illegal activity are prosecuted to the full 
extent of the law. 

Those employees who are confronted daily with serious 
CTA problems and deal with them in an honest and profes- 
sional manner are held above all in everyone's esteem. 



7983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



69th street 

employees' 

response to 

garage fire 

earns praises 



"CTA employees risked 

their own safety to save 

those buses. ..' 

Sixth District Fire Chief 
William Foran 





Bus operators John Odom (left), and Clifton Hubbard (right), walk through Bay Six of the 
69th Street bus garage with CTA Chairman Michael Cardllli on an inspection of the fire 
damaged area. 



Chicago firefighter gives a burned bus a final dowsing of water at the 69th Street garage 
where 10 buses were destroyed and three others were damaged on January 5. No injuries 
were reported. 

The predawn calm of Wednesday, 
January 5, at 69th Steet and Ashland 
Avenue ended abruptly at 5:45 a.m. 
with the scream of fire department 
sirens, the roar of fire engines and the 
pounding boots of 100 firefighters 
rushing to quell a blaze in the 69th 
Street bus garage. 

By the time the fire in Bay Six was 
put out hours later, and firefighters 
rolled up their hoses and drove away 
in their 20 fire engines and other ve- 
hicles, 10 buses had been destroyed 
and three others partially damaged. 
Their loss totaled more than a million 
dollars. 

Fortunately, there were no injuries 
and damage to the sturdy 75-year-old 
brick bus garage was minimal. The 
fire, of undetermined origin, is still 
under investigation. 

The loss could have been much 
greater if it were not for the dedicated 
efforts of many CTA employees who 
were either at the garage or rushed to 
it to help. 

Many organized themselves in a 
planned emergency evacuation of ve- 
hicles from the garage. The plan. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Michael Horowitz is named 
APTA subcommittee chairman 



Michael N. Horowitz, group mana- 
ger, Public Affairs/Consumer Serv- 
ices, has been selected by the Ameri- 
can Public Transit Association (APTA) 
to be chairman of its Subcommittee 
on Public Relations and Community 
Affairs. 

The international organization, head- 
quartered in Washington, represents 
some 400 bus and rapid transit systems 
throughout the United States and 
Canada. Besides promoting research 
and investigation, APTA develops 
common policies for problems facing 
the transit industry. 

Horowitz has been with CTA since 
1981. As chairman of the Subcommit- 
tee on Public Relations and Commu- 
nity Affairs, he will help formulate pol- 
icy and work on instructional material 
aimed at informing the public about 
transit industry positions. 

Prior to joining CTA, Horowitz was 
president of his own public relations 



firm in Chicago. He also served as 
director of public relations and adver- 
tising for Playboy Clubs International, 
and was director of public relations 
and board services for the National 
Restaurant Association. 

In 1971 and 1972, Horowitz was a 
news anchorman, reporter, and pan- 
elist on WBBM-TV. Channel 2. He 
was Southeast Asia assistant bureau 
chief and field producer for the Amer- 
ican Broadcasting Company's 
radio and television division from 
1969 to 1971. 

He was a TV news show producer 
for WLS-TV, Channel 7 from 1965 to 
1969, and served as moderator and 
panelist on a news interview show. He 
also worked as an assignment desk 
editor. 

Horowitz is a graduate of Grinnel 
(la.) College, and lives in Chicago's 
downtown area. 



which was created through the coop- 
eration of several departments, won 
high praise from Sixth District Fire 
Chief William Foran who helped direct 
the firefighters. 

"It must have taken the. CTA 
employees only 10 to 15 minutes to 
drive out 30 to 40 buses from the 
burning bay and adjoining bays and 
give our firefighters room to maneuver 
in battling the blaze. 

"CTA employees risked their own 
safety to save those buses. I was told, 
though I didn't see it myself, that some 
of our firefighters had to restrain CTA 
employees from returning to the fire 
scene to rescue more of the buses," 
Foran said. 

"Everyone involved with moving 
buses from the hub of the fire area in 
Bay Six and adjoining bays should 
be commended for their efforts," said 
Tom D. Boyle, Manager, Safety 
department. 

"After arriving at the 69th street 
garage about 7 a.m. that morning, it 
was obvious to me that we would have 
sustained far greater losses if numer- 



ous people from the Maintenance and 
Transportation departments had not 
driven buses away from the fire area," 
Boyle said. 

Superintendent Thomas Reilly of 
the 69th Street garage had high praise 
for six employees. 

"My personal thanks goes to 
operators W.B. Jones, John Odom, 
and Otwa Clemons and clerks David 
Broadnax and Lawrence Craig. The 
three operators, disregarding their 
own safety, returned to Bay Six time 
after time to remove buses. The two 
clerks notified the CTA's Control 
Center and the Chicago Fire Depart- 
ment." Reilly said. 

Other employees cited for their 
efforts include District "A" Assistant 
Superintendent Eugene Daniels and 
the following supervisors; James 
Mincey, Marshall Smith, Herman 
Mathus, Fred Williams, Rufus Morris, 
Jesse Burns, Ernest Thomatis, Gerald 
Mallory, Milton Rolland, Samuel 
Burns, Martin Morrison, Willie 
Williams, Charles Miller, John Kenna, 
and Eugene Thurmond. 



District "B" employees cited in- 
cluded Superintendent James Ohse, 
Assistant Superintendent William 
Kilstrom, and the following super- 
visors: Charles Huber, Arthur Allen, 
Roy Cameron, Clarence Brown, and 
Evan Rhoda. 

Equipment Engineering & Mainte- 
nance Department personnel at the 
fire scene included Night Foreman 
James O'Brien; bus repairers Tom 
Hummel, John Bender, Robert Bosco, 
Robert Chew Jr., David Evans, Tevell 
Simpson, J. P. Bednar, and Richard 
Suiba; bus servicers Charles Williams, 
Ronald Griffin, and Matthew Murray. 

Facilities Engineering & Maintenance 
Department, Utilities Section personnel 
at the 69th street garage fire included 
Supervisor Michael Kelly, wreck truck 
drivers Booker Sitgraves, George 
Howard, and Tyrone Washington, 
wreck truck helpers Donald Jarmus, 
Willie Walton, and Calvin Oldham, 
refuse truck driver Scott Maginnis, 
refuse truck helper Jose Rodriguez, and 
West Shops floormen William Downs 
and Angelo Evans. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



Commendation Corner 



Isaac Jones (North Park 
garage) was complimented 
for "his unfailing courtesy, 
good humor and profession- 
alism" by Darryl Boehmer, of 
Lakeside Place, who was a 
rider on his No. 136 Sheridan/ 
LaSalle Express bus. "The 
bus was crowded, the win- 
dows steamed up, and many 
of the passengers surly and 
sullen. The driver was more 
than polite with the passen- 
gers, who seemed to think 
they merited special treat- 
ment. He was well-mannered, 
and we weren't thrown from 
one side of the bus to the 
other because of his driving. 
In short, my morning got off 
to a good start, largely be- 
cause of him." 




Stephen Conway (Archer 
garage), operator of a No. 
53A South Pulaski bus, was 
described by Martin Doorhy, 
of West 66th Place, as "the 
most courteous and affable 
gentleman I have had the 
pleasure of meeting in 13 
years of using your service. 
Over the past several months 
I have observed this gentle- 
man on perhaps 20 occa- 
sions. Not once have I heard 
him utter an unkind word to 
anyone. Indeed, he is so tire- 
lessly cheerful and solicitous 
of his passengers that I feel 
obliged to reiterate: never 
have I seen an equal in utiliz- 
ing your service almost daily 
for more than a decade." 



John Young (Beverly garage) has "an outstanding per- 
sonality," according to Dyann Miller, of South Peoria Street, 
who is a regular rider on his No. 8A South Halsted bus. "He 
is courteous and considerate of all his passengers, even 
those insulting to him. He waits for the elderly to be seated 
before he moves the bus. He also does this for pregnant 
women. And he smiles for everyone. 1 am not writing this 
letter on a whim. 1 ride this young man's bus frequently. If 
you had more employees like him, it would always be a 
pleasure to ride CTA." 



William Wolf (Forest Glen garage) is appreciated by 
Patricia Yauch, who works on Bradley Place and is a fre- 
quent rider on his No. 81 Lawrence bus. "The rain was 
pouring down and the driver asked the last man on if there 
were more and, when assured not, he started up, only to 
hear someone holler that a woman had fallen just as she 
came to the stop. The driver immediately stopped, got out 
and helped the young lady to her feet, making sure she 
wasn't hurt, then helped her onto the bus. He is an excellent 
driver, careful and caring of the rules of the road in all types 
of weather." 



Amparo Alvarez (Forest Glen garage) was thanked by 
Katherine Leonard, of Beacon Street, for "renewing my 
faith in humanity" as operator of a No. 80 Irving Park bus. "1 
was struggling to make it (to the bus) before the light 
changed, but was not able to. However, this beautiful lady 
driver spotted me and stopped the bus to pick me up. All the 
way to Springfield Avenue she extended the same kindness 
to all elderly people boarding. She has a rare gift which is so 
hard to find these days, and that is being able to extend 
human kindness cheerfully to anyone needing it." 



Melvin Lindsey Jr. (77th Street garage) was commended 
by Mrs. M.C. Thomas, of Ingleside Avenue, for his handling 
of a No. 4 Cottage Grove bus. "When a horde of passengers 
boarded (many cheaters take advantage of the busyness at 
the front door to get on at the back and avoid paying), he 
delayed opening the rear exit door until all waiting 
passengers had boarded. He also observed through his rear- 
view mirror the exchange of transfers between a disembark- 
ing person and one about to board, and refused to accept 
the transfer. Lastly, he constantly urged riders to move to 
the back of the bus." 



Walter White (Beverly garage) was called "an excellent 
bus driver" by Sister Mary Verola, who teaches at a school 
on Torrence Avenue and was a rider on his No. 106 
103rd/ 106th bus. "A car stalled right in front of our bus. 
The driver, using his head, waved the cars around to help 
relieve the congestion, then got the bus back into traffic. 
There were teenage students from at least three high schools 
as well as college students. When one tried to sneak in 
without paying, the driver stopped the passengers getting 
on, walked calmly to the back, and escorted the kid off. 
Calm efficiency and no incident!" 



Denise Cherry (North Park garage) was praised by 
Francis Beaudoin, of North Lake Shore Drive, for "her ut- 
most personal attention, consideration and assistance" as 
operator of a No. 146 Marine/Michigan bus. "There are 
several of us who attend church on Sunday morning, and 
each week she is at the stop precisely on time. Several times 
on weekdays I have ridden the bus she was driving, and 
each time she showed the same concern for passengers. 
She is a very good example of what the public expects of 
safe and efficient driving, and 1 am sure there are others who 
have ridden with her and have noticed also." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Commendation Corner 



Patricia Cobb (North Park 
garage) was appreciated by 
Babette Brody, of South 
Shore Drive, for being "not 
only a superb driver in heavy 
traffic, but also the pleasant- 
est bus driver I've yet en- 
countered. I'm blind, with a 
white cane, and she was ex- 
ceptionally courteous, not 
starting the (No. 151 Sheri- 
dan) bus in traffic until she 
was assured I had a seat. She 
announced the name of each 
street as we approached it, 
mentioning also the names 
of the large buildings or 
hotels, and occasionally the 
shops and restaurants. As 
each passenger left the bus, 
she wished us individually a 
happy day." 




Maurice McDowell (West 
Section) was praised by Mark 
Richardson, of Cicero, for his 
performance as conductor of 
a Congress/Milwaukee train 
one Saturday afternoon. "I 
envisioned this to be just 
another ride downtown, but 
what I observed was your 
conductor going out of his 
way: to help senior citizens, 
answering their travel ques- 
tions in a most polite man- 
ner; collecting fares while 
dealing with individual prob- 
lems in a most expert way; 
and having the finest disposi- 
tion that I've ever encount- 
ered using CTA service. This 
gentleman possesses a high 
degree of tact, which he uses 
most efficiently on his job." 



Lawrence Hart (North Avenue garage) is an "outstand- 
ing" operator, according to Maria Tikasz, who works on 
Irving Park Road. "He is an excellent handler of the (No. 86 
North/Narragansett) bus, a careful driver, and picks up after 
the passengers when he arrives at the turnaround. He is a 
very conscientious fare collector, and a good business rela- 
tions man, greeting each passenger and treating everybody 
with utmost courtesy. The result: all the teenagers on the 
bus are well behaved and polite, and friendly to him. I wish 
to thank him for all the kindness he extends to us. the pub- 
lic, all the time." 



Lonnie Walker (North Park garage) was the operator of a 
No. 22 Clark bus that Frances Pierres. of Winnemac Ave- 
nue, rode one morning. "He represents the most courteous 
of all drivers 1 have seen for a long time. Not only was it ob- 
vious in his handling of boarding passengers, but the man- 
ner in which he did it. If it was a case of someone boarding 
the wrong bus, he expressed regret that it happened, and 
gave explicit instructions on which bus to take and where to 
board it. He was very generous with his 'Thank you' and 
'You're welcome,' was a very careful driver, and gave us a 
smooth and comfortable ride.'' 



Jackie Pritt (Rail District North), supervisor at Howard ter- 
minal, was commended by W. A. Carrington Jr., of Evan- 
ston, who passes through the terminal during morning rush 
periods. "He hustles. He is out of his office and into the cab 
of a train if the motorman doesn't get his train out of the sta- 
tion soon after the sound of the starting bell. If the train 
doors don't close, he moves to find out why from the con- 
ductor. If the train has improper identification signal lamps 
or signs displayed, he makes the motorman and conductor 
aware of it. He appears to take pride in doing a good job " 



Charles Young (West Section) made "an enthusiastic" 
impression on Albert Ferrara, of Highland Park, with "the 
manner in which he performs" as conductor of a Douglas/ 
Milwaukee train. "When riding on his train from the Loop to 
the Jefferson Park station, his assistance to the public was 
excellent. At every station stop he took the time not only to 
identify the station, but to give the block numbers west and 
north. He also offered the time of day intermittently, and at 
the end of the run he thanked all of the passengers for riding 
the CTA and wished them well on their way home." 



David Johnson (52nd Street garage) is the operator of a 
No. 14 South Lake Shore Express bus that E. J. Lett, of 
Constance Avenue, considers "definitely worth waiting for. I 
ride this particular bus every evening, and I have never ex- 
perienced a smoother ride on any other CTA bus. When- 
ever I board his bus it is almost like stepping into a chauf- 
feured limousine. 1 can even doze off if I want to or read 
without worrying. This driver is in complete control at all 
times. He drives the bus; the bus does not drive him. I have 
heard others say, 'I will let two or three buses go by just so I 
can ride his bus.' 



Isaiah Taylor Jr. (69th Street garage) was called "a credit 
and an asset" to CTA by Carol Nelson, of Rhodes Avenue, 
for his courtesy as operator of a No. 75 74th/75th bus. "On 
a cold winter morning, this kind driver saw me trying to get 
to the bus stop. Instead of going ahead, which he could 
have done because there wasn't anyone else at the stop, he 
waited for me to board. If he hadn't, I probably would have 
been late for an important appointment. While riding, I 
witnessed him extending the same courtesy and respect to 
other passengers. He was just that kind and professional. 
Again I thank him." 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



Thanks — for a 
job well done 

Syed Alimuddin, West Section 

Johnny Banks, 52nd Street 

John Cadenhead, 52nd Street 
John Cameron, Ashland 
James Catching, Lawndale 
Dolores Cintron, North Avenue 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Gregory Cobbs, Limits 
Claude Conwell, 69th Street 
Nemesio Coss, Forest Glen 
Marvin Covington, Limits 
George Crawford, 69th Street 

Juan DeLeon, Forest Glen 
Travis Dixon, 77th Street 
Llewellyn Domingo, 

Howard/Kimball 
Louis Dovichi, North Avenue 

Eva Edwards, North Avenue 
Carliss Ellison, North Park 
Eugene Embry, Ashland 

Dorothy Flournoy, 77th Street 
Frank Foster, Douglas/Congress 

Bertram Gage, North Avenue 
James Gardner, North Park 
Abraham Garron Jr., Archer 
John Gibson, Forest Glen 
Barbara Glenn, 77th Street 
Eugene Graham, Archer 
Edgar Griffin Jr., North Avenue 
Tommy Gumbus, North Avenue 

Dan Hall, 77th Street 
Clois Harper, 69th Street 
Cleotha Harris, North Avenue 
Seymour Hoffman, North Park 
Harriett Houser, South Section 

Donald Jackson, Limits 
Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Willie James, North Park 
Eileen Jensen, Forest Glen 
David Johnson, 52nd Street 
Manuel Johnson, Beverly 
Phillip Johnson, Archer 
Vincent Johnson, 69th Street 
William Jones, Rail-North 
Alfred Jordan, Archer 

Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland 
John Lemond, North Park 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 

Larry Malone, Archer 
Marvin Marshall, Forest Park 




Cultural exchange 



Gordon Technical High School senior Mark Yedinak, 17 (center), was a recent 
guest in the home of the Joaquim Fulgencio family in Lavradio, Portugal, where 
he spent two months on a cultural exchange program under the auspices of the 
American Field Service Organization. Members of his host family are. (from left), 
Joaquim. Ricardco Jorge, Christina, and Mrs. Aldo Fulgencio. Yedinak, the son 
of Material Handling Specialist Michael Yedinak, CTA Materials Management, is 
the first Gordon Tech student to participate in the exchange program. He ranks in 
the upper three percent of his high school class and is a member of the National 
Honor Society, a flutist in the Gordon Tech concert and marching band, and plays 
for the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church choir. After graduating from high 
school he plans to pursue studies in computer science, or law. The younger 
Yedinak is also an amateur biking enthusiast whose goal is to compete in profes- 
sional bike racing. 



Adolph Marth, Forest Glen 
Arlanders Martin, North Park 
Angel Martinez, North Park 
Ellis May, Archer 
Hager McFarland, Forest Glen 
Augustin Mercado, Forest Glen 
Earl Miles, Lawndale 
Lura Minter, North Avenue 
Isaias Molina, Forest Glen 
Howard Monroe, North Park 
Alvin Moore, Washington Garage 

Antonio Nunez, North Park 

Luis Ortega, North Avenue 
Dianna Owens, North Park 

Eugene Paoli, North Park 
Melvin Payne, 77th Street 
Lana Ferryman, West Section 
Eduardo Pescatore, Forest Glen 
Edward Poche, District B 
Michael Powell, Howard/Kimball 
Sharon Prescott, 69th Street 

Frederick Ragsdale, North Park 
Thomas Rhone, 77th Street 

Joseph Scaletta, North Park 
Sam Shipp, 69th Street 
Robert Spann, North Park 



Franklin Spring, North Park 
Ronald Stefinsky, Archer 
David Strong, Ashland 
Edward Sullivan, Beverly 

Leonard Taylor, North Park 
Lynval Thompson, 52nd Street 
David Thorps, West Section 
Blanca Torres, Forest Glen 
Lawrence Turner, Forest Glen 

Clarence VanMiddlesworth, 

North Park 
Frank Vazquez, Lawndale 

Allen Wade, 52nd Street 
Elvis Wade, Forest Glen 
Grant Wagner, Howard/Kimball 
eleven Wardlow, Limits 
Harry Ware Jr., North Park 
Javid Wasson, North Park 
Charles Whitman Jr., Lawndale 
Cora Williams, Beverly 
Willie Williams Jr., North Park 
Quentin Wilmington, North Park 
Karen Wilson, North Section 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Cutting through the paper work is often a daily tasl^ for some CTA management positions. This exercise assesses how prospective 
trainees would approach such work. Assistant Superintendent/Controller Tony Smith (left), and Transportation Program Analyst William 
Sholdice (right) rate these candidates. 



Assessment center 
discovers future leaders 



If George M. Pullman had known that neighbor John J. 
Glessner's home would some day be used as a center for 
assessing the capabilities of aspiring transportation manage- 
ment personnel, perhaps he would have had a different at- 
titude about the building which he called "a monstrosity." 

In 1885, however, when Pullman, the railroad magnate, 
and Glessner, an International Harvester founder, both liv- 
ed in Chicago's Prairie Avenue District, Pullman could look 
out of his window and see the Glessner mansion which he 
thought was the most revolting piece of real estate on the 
face of the earth. 

Today, this national architectural landmark at 1800 
Prairie Avenue, designed by Henry Hobson Richardson, is 
rented to CTA by the Chicago Architectural Foundation for 
use as its Assessment Center headquarters. The perfect 
choice for such an important CTA facility, it is the creme de 
la creme of the Prairie Avenue Historic District, used as a 
site to sort out the creme de la creme of CTA's future 
leaders. 



It is here that the managerial potential of young men and 
women is put through a pace designed to underscore likely 
survivors of an enduring management and professional in- 
ternship, hence quality CTA leadership for the future. 

If indeed one is to be selected for training, the individual's 
abilities must certainly complement Architect Richardson's 
artistry which he so elegantly demonstrated in his intricate 
design of the Glessner House interior. 

As Richardson was ahead of his peers, so must CTA 
management aspirants brought to the site of his handiwork 
be ahead of their peers in their approach to leadership. "The 
important thing to remember is that no one here is com- 
peting against anyone else. Their competition is within 
themselves in terms of how they meet the challenges 
presented in the Assessment Center," said Transportation's 
Edward Mitchell, Director of Training and Utility. 

Applicants selected for assessment are determined 
through process of interview by Transportation Department 
assessors and administrators who run the Assessment 
Center. It is here that a battery of tests, which run the gamut 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 1 & 2 







WW ' 


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Assessors prepare their score sheets as candidates are driiled in 
specific exercises designed to determine their suitability for 
management training. 




Rosemary l-losl^ins is enthusiastic as she discusses an exercise 
with Assistant Superintendent/Controller Tony Smith. The North 
Parl( bus operator was one of 12 employees whose management 
potential was assessed at the Glessner Mouse Assessment 
Center. 



of management from interviewing skills to problem solving, 
are conducted. 

Mitchell's Assessment Center staff includes Area 
Superintendent of Instruction Robert Desvignes, Training 
Center Superintendent Elonzo Hill, Training Center Assis- 
tant Superintendent Norman Herron, Superintendent of 
Rail Instruction Robert Janz, Assistant Superintendent of 
Rail Instruction Arthur Hubbard, and District A Superinten- 
dent Lason Matthews. 

Other staff members are: Assistant Superintendent, Per- 
sonnel, Cynthia Florence; Superintendent, Planning Pro- 
grams, William Mooney; Assistant Superintendent for Bus 
Instruction, South, William Thompson; Area Superinten- 
dent, Near North, Michael Lacriola; Assistant 
Superintendents/Controllers, Tony Smith and Miles Smith; 
and Transportation Program Analyst William Sholdice. The 
staff has maintained the Assessment Center's sophistication 
and kept it on schedule in spite of the frequent influx of 
tourists who visit the Glessner House to enjoy its late 19th 
century architectural splendor. 

James McPhee, one of 12 aspirants who enjoyed the 
Assessment Center experience, said, "If you really believe 
you're management material, you should go through the 
Assessment Center." 

McPhee, an agent supervisor who hopes to be selected 
for the next management training class, said the most im- 
portant aspect of the center is its feedback sessions. Here 
assessors review management strengths and weaknesses 
with each candidate who wishes to have a follow-up inter- 
view. 

"Feedback gives the individual an opportunity to make 
improvements in the skills required for management. It's a 
learning tool," said McPhee, who was making his second 
visit to the center. 

Summing up from management's point of view, Robert 
Desvignes, Area Superintendent of Instruction, said "The 
Assessment Center approaches a more scientific means of 
identifying people with management skills and abilities as 
opposed to their attributes being determined on the basis of 
gut feelings" 




Training, common knowledge, and experience meet head on in decision making exercise (or prospective management trainees. 



CJA TRANSIT NEWS 



Photo enthusiast captures 
aesthetics of new facilities 




Photography enthusiast Ted Radakovic, a 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Department 
communications coordinator, recorded Janu- 
ary construction progress at Jefferson Park 
terminal and the new River Road station as 
CTA moved closer to extending rail service to 
O'Hare International Airport. 

Since both photographer and contractors 
were uninhibited by foul weather, a rarity for 
January in Chicago, Radakovic was able to 
capture the real essence of the service com- 
muters and other travelers may enjoy on the 
new rapid transit facilities en route to the 
airport. 



Exterior of Cumberland station's circular pedestrian collector and covered 
escalator near complex of buildings south of expressway and west of 
Cumberland. Bus passengers and Park 'N' Ride and Kiss 'N' Ride users enter 
station at base of escalator or at base of collector which houses spiral staircase 
and concessions. Covered walkway at left of collector leads to office building 
south of expressway. Covered walkway to right of escalator leads (out of 
picture) to fare controls above median strip platform and continues north to 
north side of Kennedy Expressway. 

Three-track, two-platform terminal under O'Hare Airport parking lot will 
be opened later this year. Two of the three tracks are for in-service trains. 
The third track is in the holding area for the third train. Terminal will have 
a Transportation office. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 1 & 2 




Art deco style of architecture is seen in the atrium of River Road 
station looiiing east to platform canopy with plastic skylights. 

Dramatic plastic skylight over pedestrian collector at Cumberland 
station. Skylight is about 40 feet above floor. 

View of arched skylight canopy above Cumberland station platform. 

Ever-changing scene in Harlem station due to progress is summed 
up with the sign on the right of the deck opening for future escalator. 
View is west from street level station down to trackside platform. 

Larry Oomens (right), program analyst, Transportation Department, Joe Siegal (glasses), 
supervisor, Power & Wiring Section, Facilities Engineering & fi^aintenance Department, 
and Tom Lowery, signal foreman. Signal Maintenance Section, examine wayside train sig- 
nal control box. 

Sweeping curved stairs flank dual escalators in River Road station leading from bus ter- 
minal and parking lot to trackside platform. Walls and exterior stairway panels are made 
of granite. 

Jumble of wires are carefully connected into circuits in panel of local switching control 
near Harlem station by Pat Barry, foreman/lineman lor electrical contractor on O'Hare 
Extension. Local switching control unit will permit emergency switching operations of 
trains. 





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13 



Claims/Law exceeds $1 million 
in collections for damages 



For the first time in its history, CTA's 
Claims/Law Department has collected 
more than $1 million in one year for 
damages to CTA property, or injury to 
its employees by third parties. 

Donald Werdell, director. Claims/ 
Law Department, said the department's 
subrogation unit, under the supervi- 
sion of Margaret Conway, collected 
$1,030,980.27. 

Subrogation representatives are 
John Bosacki, Jeff Campos. Theresa 
Sawyer, and Arthur Thomas. Others 
in the unit are Cecil Mimms and 



Charles Olcikas, bus estimators, and 
Elaine McGregory and Fred Ridley, 
clerical staff. 

Ms. Conway said the success of her 
staff in 1982 was due in many ways to 
the cooperation of various CTA de- 
partments with the Claims/Law 
Department. 

Werdell said, "We have an obliga- 
tion to the taxpayers to collect from 
third parties, and we believe the CTA 
Claims/Law Department is a leader 
in this particular area in the transit 
industry." 



Happy Northwestern Wildcat travelers 




Northwestern University's cheerleading squad and other enthusiastic Wildcat sup- 
porters are whooping it up at the Central Street CTA rapid transit station to re- 
mind collegiate basketball fans that its easy traveling to Northwestern home games 
this season by CTA. Northwestern Wildcats home basketball games for this Big 10 
season are being played at DePaul University while Northwestern's McGaw Hall 
is being renovated. Travelers to DePaul from Evanston need only take a south- 
bound train to Howard Street and change to a southbound Howard Street train to 
Fullerton which boarders the DePaul campus. 



Law for today 

A lawyer prepared my will sev- 
eral years ago and, in the mean- 
time, both of the witnesses died. 
Does this make my will invalid? 

No. Your will may still be admitted 
to probate if proof of the wit- 
nesses" handwriting is presented 
to the court to authenticate their 
signature. This procedure is also 
available if a witness is 1) blind, 2) 
physically or mentally incapable 
of testifying, 3) cannot be found, 

4) in the U.S. armed services, or 

5) outside the state. 

— Illinois State Bar Association 



Q. Our 15 year old daughter was 
hospitalized for several weeks 
last year in a city 35 miles from 
our home and we made daily 
trips to visit her. Can the cost of 
our transportation be deducted 
on our federal income tax as a 
medical expense? 

A. No. Transportation expenses rela- 
tive to an illness are only deducti- 
ble if they are primarily for and 
essential to actual medical care. 
Visiting a family member who is 
hospitalized does not qualify as a 
deduction. 

— Illinois State Bar Association 

Q. How old do you have to be to 
operate a snowmobile? 

A. Generally, 16 years old. How- 
ever, persons over 10 and less 
than 12 years of age may operate 
a snowmobile if accompanied 
on the snowmobile by a parent, 
guardian or other authorized adult. 
Persons over 12 and less than 16 
years of age may be accompanied 
by an authorized person who is 
over 16. A person between 12 
and 16 years of age may also ap- 
ply to the Illinois Department 
of Conservation for a certificate 
authorizing the holder to operate 
snowmobiles. 

— Illinois State Bar Association 



Submit questions to: 

Illinois State Bar Association 
Illinois Bar Center 
Springfield, IL 62701 

(Answers may appear in columns. Personal 
answers not possible.) 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Materials management 
participates in minority 
supplier development 

Five representatives of CTA Materials Management par- 
ticipated in the Buyer Orientation Seminar held November 
19 and sponsored by the Transportation Subcouncil of the 
Chicago Regional Purchasing Council. 

Heading the list of CTA representatives was Market 
Research Analyst Olivia Bradley, CTA representative to the 
council. Others participating in the orientation, which con- 
vened at offices of the Illinois Central Gulf Railroad at 233 
North Michigan Avenue, were Procurement Engineers 
Eugene Fregetto and Mike Wisbrod, and Buyers Geoff 
Layhe and Edna Southworth. 

The orientation is part of an ongoing effort of the 
Transportation Subcouncil, Chicago Regional Purchasing 
Council, Inc.. to develop minority-owned companies that 
can provide goods and services needed for operations of the 
Transportation industry. 

CTA and other members of the subcouncil have collec- 
tively developed and assumed responsibility for carrying out 
an " Adopt- A-Company" program. The thrust of this pro- 
gram consists of selecting a number of minority firms which 
meet all of the subcouncil's criteria of marketing, educa- 
tional, technical and other assistance needed by these firms 
to expand their sales to subcouncil members, their prime 
contractors and other major buying organizations. 




Henry Bellagamba (left) of Fullerton Industrial Supply, Inc., a mill 
and hardware supplier, meets with CTA Procurement Engineer 
Eugene Fregetto (right) during the Transportation Subcouncil. 
Chicago Regional Purchasing Council's Buyer Orientation. Others 
in the background are Market Research Analyst Olivia Bradley (left), 
and Buyer Edna Southworth (back to camera), meeting with David 
Sullivan of Indel Electrical Distributors, Inc. Procurement Engineer 
Mike Wisbrod (seated, wearing glasses), and Buyer Geoff Layhe 
confer with Al McCaskill of Indel Electrical Distributors. 



Terry Magdongon celebrates citizenship 




When Terry Magdongon became a 
naturalized citizen of the United States, 
it was the culmination of a decision she 
had made when she moved to Chicago 
in 1976. 

The former English professor, 
turned CTA Forms/Records/Proce- 
dures Coordinator, emigrated from 
the Philippines in 1975. settling first in 
Honolulu where she was a participant 
in a textbook writing project at the 
East-West Center. She began to estab- 
lish permanent residence in the United 
States the next year, 19 years after she 
had first come to this country to pur- 
sue graduate studies in English lan- 
guage and literature at the University 
of Michigan. 

Upon completion of her studies in 
1964, Terry returned to her native 
land to teach English at the University 
of the Philippines near Manila. She 
also taught basic English and literature 
classes at the U.S. Air Force base 



(Clark Air Base) before returning to 
the United States in 1975. 

In 1981, after five years of service 
with the Chicago Urban Transporta- 
tion District, Terry joined the Chicago 
Transit Authority. She passed the ex- 
amination for citizenship and was ad- 
ministered the U.S. Citizenship Oath 
of Allegiance Jan. 15. 

"After five years, one is eligible to 
apply for U.S citizenship. Without 
citizenship, one is really detached- 
unable to vote or enjoy the other 
guarantees of a U.S. citizen," Mrs. 
Magdongon said. 

"I think voting is most important 
because it is one way of assuring that 
the republic form of government and 
democratic principles are maintained," 
she added. 

Mrs. Magdongon has two brothers 
and a sister who are also naturalized 
citizens of the United States. Their 
parents still reside in the Philippines. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



West side medical center gets modern "L" station 



A new Polk Street "L" station on the 
Douglas Rapid Transit Line taking 
riders to Chicago's University of Illinois 
Medical Center, is expected to be in 
service this spring. 

The $2.6 million steel, concrete, 
and glass structure and its platforms 
are being erected in the center of the 
medical complex. These replace the 
existing 91 -year old brick structure and 
wooden platforms on the north side of 
Polk Street which will eventually be 
removed. 

Architects of the Design and Con- 
struction Section in CTA's Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance Depart- 
ment designed and planned the entire 
project. All aspects of the project from 
design and drafting to purchasing and 
selection of contractor was done with- 
in CTA. The contractor, lowest of 
seven bidders, is John Burns Con- 
struction Company, of Orland Park. 
Construction on the new Polk Street 




Going over plans for construction of new 
Polk street station are (from left) Jotin 
Chura, superintendent, Construction Com- 
pliance, Design & Construction Section; C. 
Ricfiard Stade, project manager for Jofin 
Burns Construction Co.; Rudolpti Zepeda, 
senior design arctiltect. Design & Con- 
struction Section, and Bob Telander, con- 
struction compliance inspector. Zepeda 
headed design team for Polk street project. 




Eastslde view of new Polk street "L" station stiows window treatment of waiting area 
representing side of new rapid transit car. Both trackslde waiting areas are 40 feet by 16 
feet. Platforms and street level station will have bright lighting throughout. New facility is 
built of concrete, steel, and glass. 




View of 91-year-old Polk street "L" station built In the era of Chicago's World's Columbian 
Exposition of 1893. This outmoded station with Its dim Incandescent lighting will be re- 
placed by a spacious, flourescent lit station on the south side of Polk with a 45-foot-wlde 
window wall facing Polk. 



76 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Northbound Douglas train pulls into 91-year-old station. View is from the passengers 
waiting area on the new Polk street station, due to open in spring. Roof of passenger 
waiting area, supported by castellated beams, extends over both platforms and track area 
creating a comfort zone for waiting riders. Passenger areas are glass enclosed on three 
sides and have six infrared heaters. 



"L" station was started last spring. 

A unique feature of the new station 
is its H-shaped canopy which covers 
both 425-foot long trackside pre-cast 
concrete platforms. The passenger 
waiting areas on the platforms are 
each 40-feet long and 16-feet deep, 
and have six infrared heaters for use 
during cold weather. 

A castellated beam canopy will cover 
both waiting areas and tracks for 120- 
feet providing a comfort zone for pas- 
sengers. The two legs of the H-shaped 
canopy are 17-feet wide and cover the 
remaining stretches of the platforms. 

Each platform has a 10-foot wide 
stairway and an elevator. The spa- 
cious street level station is 75-feet long 
and 45-feet wide and is illuminated by 
fluorescent lighting. The stairs, eleva- 
tors and platforms also have fluores- 
cent lighting. 

Facing Polk on the south side of the 
street, the station will have nine-foot 
high glass walls containing two sets of 
double glass doors and a single glass 



door for handicapped persons. 

The station will also have a stainless 
steel agents' booth for two agents and 
passenger turnstiles, three coin-oper- 
ated turnstiles, and an exit turnstile, all 
made of stainless steel. Ticket agents 
will control a special gate for use by 
handicapped persons. The station will 
also have a concession stand. 

Glass walls erected on the station's 
front and two sides will make its inte- 
rior highly visible from the street. 
Riders waiting for the 37-Sedgwick/' 
Ogden buses and other transportation 
will also enjoy the comfort of two sets 
of infrared heaters inside the building 
by the glass walls. 

One of the waiting areas will also 
have two public telephones while the 
other will have a "hot line" telephone 
to the University of Illinois Medical 
Center. 

Funding for the project comes from 
the Urban Mass Transportation Ad- 
ministration, and the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Transportation. 



Bytes, bits, 
software need 
not be confusing 




If terms like byte, bits, software, flop- 
py discs and expansion interface have 
intimidated you and kept you from 
pursuing an interest in home compu- 
ters, take heart for there is hope. 

According to Bob Knudsen of 
Materials Management, the pleasure 
and rewards of home micro computers 
far outweigh the variety of technical 
considerations. 

Besides the obvious applications of 
organizational, educational aids and 
video game options, the home micro 
computer provides such remarkable 
services as out-of-town newspaper 
subscriptions, stock market quotations, 
and telephonic hook-ups to computer 
services which offer access to sophisti- 
cated state-of-the-art systems. 

The tremendous growth in the pop- 
ularity of the home micro computer 
is reflected by the large number of 
CTA employees who presently own 
computers. 

If you are a computer enthusiast 
and are looking to share ideas with 
others, you may be interested in con- 
tacting Bob Knudsen of Materials 
Management. Bob and some other 
CTA employees want to form a home 
computer club. 

If you've only begun with home 
computers and need a good source of 
information, perhaps the kind of club 
Knudsen is proposing could be just 
what you need. 

Whatever your specific interest 
about computers may be. your ideas 
would be welcome. You may contact 
Bob at the Merchandise Mart on ex- 
tension 4833. Transit News will follow 
this effort closely and provide helpful 
information as it becomes available. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 1 & 2 



17 



Combined effort at top speed meets 
Jackson Park deadline 




The reopening of three stations on the Jackson Park 'L' 
line December 12 involved a lot more than unlocking the 
gates to the elevated platforms and cutting ribbons. 

It required the combined efforts of several Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance crews working at top speed to 
restore service to the East 63rd Street stations that had been 
cut off from the rest of the line March 4. 1982. due to 
deterioration of the Dorchester bridge. 

The decision to reopen the line south of 61st Street was 
made early in August. At that time it was determined that 
the Dorchester bridge itself would not be included in the 
restoration, but that trains could be operated as far as the 
University Avenue station, where they would be turned back. 

This meant that a new crossover had to be installed east of 
the University station. New supporting structure, timber ties 
and running rail, third rail, a footwalk, and a complete 
interlocking plant for signal protection were also needed. 

Roy Smith, Senior Civil Engineer, was project manager of 
the $2.2 million project, which also called for restoration 
and repainting of the King Drive, Cottage Grove and 
University stations. At University, a new two-agent booth 
was installed, along with fluorescent lighting and 
accommodations for Transportation Department personnel. 

All this work was accomplished within the target period by 
dozens of trackmen, ironworkers, building tradesmen, 
electrical workers and others under the direction of Len 
Wiksten, Director, Facilities Maintenance, Walter Gaedtke, 
Superintendent, Power and Way, and Walter Hallford, 
Superintendent. Building and Grounds Maintenance. 



Rehabilitation work at King Drive shows track 
crews preparing for rail installation while iron- 
workers repair steel platform canopy supports. 

One of many aspects of the Jackson Park restoration 
effort was the installation by trackmen of third 
rail supports at University station. 




These field employees were given special thanks by Tom 
Wolgemuth. Manager, Facilities Engineering and Mainte- 
nance, who emphasized that, "The Authority and our pas- 
sengers who use this service owe them all a sincere debt of 
gratitude." 

Wolgemuth pointed out that before actual construction 
could even begin, drawings had to be made and designs 
completed in a much shorter than normal time frame by 
the Design and Construction Section, headed by Chris 
Kalogeras, Director, and the Power, Signal and Communi- 
cation Section, Ron Swindell. Director. 

Contributing to this effort were Stan Lee Kaderbek, struc- 
tural engineer; Steve Martin, civil engineer; Roy 
Stonecipher, signal designer, and Mike Kelly, senior traction 
power design engineer. 

Material acquisitions, sometimes on an emergency basis, 
were handled by Michael Wisbrod, procurement engineer. 
Also involved in the project was Charles Arndt, Superin- 
tendent, Facilities and Equipment Planning, Operations 
Planning. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



The Spirit of Giving 





Michael Yedinak (second from left), material handling specialist, CTA Materials 
Management department, talks with three young patients at Children's Memorial 
hospital where he distributed more than 200 of the popular "ET" dolls during the 
Christmas holidays. Yedinak's investment in the van load of dolls brought more 
return in happiness of the young patients than he could have anticipated in 
monetary reward. He said he purchased the dolls originally for resale, but decided 
to donate them to the young shut-ins at Christmas as a gesture of appreciation to 
the hospital for its tireless efforts on behalf of children who are seriously ill. He was 
prompted by the memory of an 11-year-old relative who was nourished back to 
health at the hospital after suffering a serious illness. 



Job reassignments are approved 



Fourteen job reassignments posted 
during the last two months of 1982, 
have been approved by CTA Execu- 
tive Director Bernard J. Ford. 

Former senior accountant Michael 
Cikara was named supervisor. General 
Accounting, Financial Services, while 
John Billis, former grant accounting 
technician, was selected supervisor. 
Accounts Receivable, in the same sec- 
tion, in Management Services, unit 
supervisor LaVerne Schultz moved 
from Office Services to Stenographic 
Services. 

Within Capital Development, Joan 
Berry was promoted from planner to 
unit supervisor. Grant Programs. New 
as program coordinator. Capital De- 
velopment, is Salvatore Terracina, 
former training coordinator. Human 



Resources. Alexandra Eiva, former 
forms designer. Management Serv- 
ices, is now graphic designer/produc- 
tion assistant. Public Affairs/Consum- 
er Services. 

Lee Roddy, Michael O'Sullivan and 
Andre Brewester, all former car repair- 
men, have been appointed terminal 
night foremen. Equipment Engineer- 
ing and Maintenance. In the same sec- 
tion, Charles Modock Jr. has advanced 
from combination clerk to senior com- 
bination clerk. 

Marron Robinson and Charles 
Barbee, former traffic checkers, have 
been chosen traffic clerks in Operations 
Planning. In the same section, Charles 
Myers and James Terry, former traffic 
clerks, have become schedule clerks. 



Social Security Tips 



Q. 1 recently applied for a loan from 
a finance company where I was 
asked for my Social Security 
number. A company representa- 
tive said the number would be 
used for filing purposes. Is this 
legal? 

A. Some non-governmental organi- 
zations use Social Security num- 
bers for record keeping purposes. 
Such use is neither required nor 
prohibited by federal law. Know- 
ing your number however, does 
not allow these organizations to 
get information from your Social 
Security record. 

Q. My husband died several weeks 
ago. What papers must I have in 
order to file a claim? 

A. Some of the proofs you might 
need are your deceased husband's 
Social Security number as well as 
your own, his death certificate, 
proof of marriage, children's birth 
certificates, and their Social Secur- 
ity numbers. You should also have 
your husband's W-2 forms for the 
two years preceding his death. 
Your local Social Security office 
may suggest other documents that 
may be needed. 

Q. When I started getting Social 
Security disability checks a few 
years ago I thought my pay- 
ments would continue until I 
reached age 65, returned to 
work, or until death. Why am I 
now being reviewed? 

A Benefits can be paid only as long 
as a person is unable to work 
due to severe impairment. Social 
Security is required by law to re- 
view most disability cases at least 
once every three years. 

Q. If I took early retirement at age 
55 would my Social Security 
benefits be affected? 

A Benefits are based on earnings 
averaged over your working life- 
time, therefore if there are years in 
which you had little, or no earn- 
ings your benefit amount would be 
somewhat less. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



19 



Service anniversaries 
in Janu2iry 

40 years 



William Murphy 

Beverly 



35 years 



John Brown, Kedzie 

Armando DeBuono. Forest Glen 

Louis Ford, North Avenue 

James Forrestal, Equip Engr & Maint. 

Steve Gorski, Forest Glen 

Willie Griffin, Limits 

Harry Lindberg. North Avenue 

Orval Porter, Lawndale 



30 years 



Rita Deakin, General Acctg 
Lorenzo Johnson, 77th Street 
Louis Loebbaka, Howard Kimball 
James McPhee, Fac Engr & Maint. 
Willie Meadows, Ashland Terminal 
Edna Southworth, Purchasing 
Lee Stewart, 61st Street 
Thomas Swoope, 77th Street 



25 years 



Earl Barley Sr., Training Center 

Robert Gafeney, North Section 

Norman Herron Jr., Instruction 

Andrew Jones Jr., 77th Street 

Paul Kadowaki, Instruction 

William O'Connell, Equip Engr & Maint 

Homer Reed Jr., 77th Street 

Raymond Sieloff, Archer 

Richard Smith Jr., Rail-South 

Charles Taylor, Beverly 

Robert Zirkle, District C 



MURRAY ADAMS, 81, North Section. 

Emp 10-12-43, Died 11-16-82 
STEPHEN BLACHOWSKI, 87, Archer, 

Emp. 8-22-23, Died 11-5-82 
HENRY BORGMAN, 72, 77th Street, 

Emp 1-12-34. Died 11-18-82 
ROBERT BROWN, 76, North Park, 

Emp 7-1-42, Died 11-5-82 
WALTER BUNCH. 52. District C, 

Emp 2-5-53, Died 11-10-82 
GEORGE CHRYSANTHOPOULOS, 45, 
Bus & Truck 

Mech , Emp 9 21-70. Died 11-22 82 
DIANE CRENSHAW. 35. Racine. 

Emp 2 28-79. Died 11 21 82 
JOSEPH CZAJKA. 75. Archer. 

Emp 4 24 42. Died 11 24 82 
RAYMOND DOWDLE. 74. District D. 

Emp U 30 36. Died 11 23 82 
ROBERT DWYER, 41. Wilson. 

Emp 7 15-63. Died 11 25-82 
WILLIAM FAHEY. 88. 69th Street. 

Emp 2-13 22. Died 11-11-82 



NEW PENSIONERS 



JOHN ANGEL. Line Foreman, 

West Shops. Emp. 9-16-47 
JAMES AUSTIN, instructor. 

Lawndale. Emp. 3-4-50 
WILLIAM BECKMANN. Foreman. 

West Shops. Emp. 9-22-47 
HARRY BLAKE. Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 8-9-51 
MARY ANN BOHAT, Supervisor 

Law Claims, Emp. 11-7-46 
CHARLES BROWN Jr , Car Repairer A, 

Racine Emp. 6- 14-51 
MAURICE BUCKLEY, Claims Rep , 

Law Claims, Emp. 12 31-38 
PETER CALIFF, Escalator Serviceman, 

West Shops. Emp. 1 9-48 
JOHN CHAMBERS, Controller II, 

Control Center, Emp. 4-28-48 
SAMUEL CHARLETON, Unit Supervisor. 

West Shops. Emp 11-4-46 
STANLEY CHRIST. Superintendent. 

Forest Park. Emp. 9-25-41 
ANTHONY CITRO. Car Repairman A, 

Harlem, Emp. 1-14-47 
PATRICK COLLINS, Warehouse Wrkr 1. 

South Shops, Emp 5-8-57 
LeROY CONKLIN, Operator, 

North Park. Emp 3-5-46 
FRANK CONNOLLY, Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 1-3-56 
ANTHONY CYCHNER, Bus Repairer, 

North Avenue. Emp 9-8-52 
JAMES DEGNAN. Operator. 

Archer, Emp 9-6-45 
SHELDON DEIN, Operator, 

Forest Glen. Emp 11-3-47 
JOHN DEVINE. Warehouse Wrkr I, 

South Shops, Emp 12-14-50 
DANIEL DIASIO, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp 8-7 68 
ANELLO DiGIANFILIPPO, Final Assembler, 

Rail Shops, Emp 11-27-50 
RAYMOND DOBBERTIN, Unit Supervisor. 

Lawndale, Emp 9-10-47 
SIGMUND DOBOSIEWICZ, Unit Supervisor. 

West Shops. Emp 5-20 41 
CLINTON DONLEY. Car Repairer A, 

61st Street, Emp. 4-23 51 
STEVEN DORICH, Warehouse Wrkr 1, 

South Shops, Emp 11-21 47 
CEDRIC DRAPER, Bus Repairer, 

North Park, Emp 8-13-48 
EDWARD DURAL, Electrician B, 

West Shops, Emp 3-12-51 



i3sr iwiE]iwi:oi^i-A.iwfl[ 



NATHANIEL GILL, 42, Maintenance, 

Emp 2-19-79. Died 11-19-82 
CHARLES GREER, 76, Limits, 

Emp 6-3-29, Died 10-13 82 
WILLIE HARRIS, 35, North Avenue, 

Emp 6-28-79, Died 11-7 82 
JOSEPH HIGHTOWER, 75. North Avenue. 

Emp 9-1-42. Died 11-15-82 
ELMER KNUDSON. 78. North Park. 

Emp 10-29-29. Died 11-10-82 
LOUISE KUKULKA. 93. Kedzie. 

Emp 11-22-22. Died 11-5-82 
JAMES MAHER. 70. 69th Street, 

Emp 1-8-34, Died 11 29-82 
ROCCO MASESSO. 74. Electrical. 

Emp 4-1-26, Died 11 3 82 
MIRIAM MELGAREJO, 44, Lawndale, 

Emp 3-6-75. Died 11-27-82 
JOSEPH MURPHY. 76. South Section. 

Emp 11-5-42. Died 11-14-82 
KRSTO NIKOLICH. 90. Way & Structs.. 

Emp 7-25-29. Died 11-30-82 



ANGELA DURKIN, Ticket Agent. 

North Section. Emp 10-31-71 
MICHAEL FABIAN. Machinist. 

Rail Shops. Emp 4-13-50 
WALTER FALLS Jr . Operator. 

52nd Street. Emp 2-20 51 
ANTHONY FRENCH, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp 7-10-47 
ALEXANDER FRITZLER, Bus Repairer. 

North Park. Emp 3-27-41 
PATRICK GARRITY. Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 4-2-46 
WILLIAM GONTARZ. Operator. 

Archer. Emp 1 19-61 
SALVATORE GRAZIANO. Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 5-12-52 
CLEO GRIFFIN. Motorman. 

Harlem Lake. Emp 5 2-57 
DAVID GUERECA. Final Assembler. 

Rail Shops. Emp 6 18-47 
SAMUEL GUINN. Operator 

77th Street. Emp 4-9-53 
AUGUSTUS HENNELLY. Foreman. 

North Park. Emp 10-20-48 
EDWARD HENRY. Supv.. Safety Perf.. 

Safety, Emp 8-25-48 
ALBERT HERON, Bus & Truck Mech., 

South Shops. Emp 8-25-47 
ROBERT HOLMES Jr , Operator. 

52nd Street, Emp 10 4-46 
ALBERT JACQUES, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp 1-22-52 
EUGENE JANIA, Claims Coordinator, 

Law Claims, Emp 12-1-43 
EUGENE JANKOWSKI, Elec Wrkr Hlpr. 

Rail Shops. Emp 11-28-50 
SHELTON JENKINS, Pers Investigator, 

Blue Island, Emp 3-22-57 
EDWARD JENSKl, Serv Truck Chauff , 

West Shops, Emp 7-18-47 
HOSEA JOHNSON, Foreman. 

69th Street. Emp 3-31-47 
JOHN JOHNSON. Instructor. 

Beverly, Emp 4 23-55 
JOHN JOYCE, Foreman, 

Forest Glen, Emp 3-4-47 
NIKOLAS KARLOS, Rail Janitor. 

Madison & Wabash, Emp 3-5-68 
BERNARD KLATT, Machinist. 

South Shops. Emp 11-10 47 
JOHN KLOSKA, Conductor, 

Jefferson Park, Emp 11-30-45 
EDWARD KNIAZ, Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 8-9-46 
HEZEKIAH KNOWLES, Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 8-31-64 
FRANK KOZIOL. Operator. 

North Park. Emp 4-26-45 
EDWARD KUEMMEL. Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 11-24-47 



KATHLEEN O'DONNELL, 75. North Section, 

Emp 2-15-51, Died 11 7-82 
WALTER OSTROWSKI, 58, North Park. 

Emp 4-4-63, Died 11-1-82 
WILLIAM PERREAULT, 81, 77th Street. 

Emp 10 21-41, Died 11-16-82 
SAMUEL PINCICH, 79. Engineering, 

Emp 9 6-29, Died 11-30-82 
ELLA RALL. 84, South Shops. 

Emp 10 27-19. Died 11-4-82 
MARY RUSSELL. 89. South Section, 

Emp 6 2 42, Died 11-82 
CHARLES SASSO. 91, South Section. 

Emp 9 24 12, Died 11-23-82 
PATRICK SHIELDS, 84. West Section. 

Emp 2 8 22, Died 11-5-82 
PAUL SIMONS, 87, North Avenue. 

Emp 11 20 20, Died 10-22-82 
PETER SWALSAK, 90, Devon, 

Emp 5 21 13, Died 10-29-82 
JAMES WALSH, 64, Labor Relations, 

Emp 4 29 46, Died 11-6-82 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



ALBERT KUNICKIS. Operator, 

Archer, Emp 3-16-61 
ROBERT KURTZ, Comb. Clk, Coord,, 

South Shops, Emp. 10-19-48 
THOMAS LALLY, Car Repairman A, 

Racine, Emp. 2-28-50 
WARDELL LEE, Rail Janitor. 

Madison & Wabash, Emp. 12-1-53 
ROBERT LEMKE, Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 3-31-47 
THADDEUS LESNIAK, Elec Wrkr. Frmn , 

Rail Shops, Emp 10-17-45 
HOWARD LODDING, Sub-station Attndt., 

West Shops, Emp. 6-14-46 
HERBERT LOWENSTEIN, Area Supt., 

Rail Service, Emp. 11-1-45 
LINO LUPETINI, Elec Mtce Man, 

Rail Shops, Emp. 11-4-52 
PETER MARONCELLl, Conductor, 

Forest Park, Emp 7-23-48 
CLEO MARSH, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 8-27-52 
CLARENCE MATTHEWS, Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 7-26 51 
FRANK McDERMOTT, Sub-station Attndt , 

West Shops, Emp. 11 18-47 
JOSEPH McNAMARA, Carpenter 

South Shops, Emp 11-19 45 
RICHARD MECKER, Claims Rep.. 

Law/Claims, Emp 3-1-47 
STANLEY MICHALEC, Serv. Truck Chauff 

West Shops, Emp 2-13-46 
JOSEPH MIKIETA. Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 12-10-48 
KENNETH MIKOTA, Superintendent, 

Contract Constr , Emp. 11-22-48 
PAUL MINOGUE, Budget Admin , 

Equip Engr. & Mtce., Emp 9-17-40 
WILLIAM MONROE, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp 5-10-51 
CLEO NEWSOME. Ticket Agent, 

South Section, Emp. 12-10-48 
WILLIAM NICHOLS, Prod Contr. Coord., 

South Shops, Emp 3-13-52 
STANLEY NIEMAN, Bus & Truck Mech.. 

South Shops, Emp. 3-12-4V 



DANIEL NONCEK, Instructor, 

North Park, Emp 2-2-48 
GEORGE F OCHOTNECKI, Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 5-29-46 
ALBERT OCHWAT, Supervisor. 

District D, Emp 11-12-48 
WALTER ONYSIO, Shopman I, 

Rail Shops, Emp 6-28-50 
PETER O'SULLIVAN, Supervisor, 

District D, Emp 4-26-50 
AMBROSE PANICO, Clerk, 

North Avenue, Emp 7-22-63 
ALEXANDER PAVESIC, Lineman, 

West Shops, Emp 8-22-42 
WALLACE PETERSEN, Operator, 

Beverly, Emp 8 15-47 
McCLINTON PORTER Jr., Superintendent, 

77th Street, Emp 4-11-50 
THOMAS RAWLINGS, Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 7-1-48 
JOHN RUSS, Shopman I, 

Rail Shops. Emp 2-2-49 
DONALD RYAN, B Electrician. 

West Shops. Emp. 5-9-50 
PETER SABADOSA, Car Repairman A, 

54th Street, Emp 3-3-50 
DAWSON SAMPLES, Bus & Truck Mech., 

South Shops, Emp 10-7-52 
EDWARD SCOTT, Rail Foreman, 

Madison & Wabash, Emp 1-24-57 
PHILIP SEIBEL, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 9-9 46 
MYRON SEVERSON, Shopman I, 

Rail Shops, Emp 10 2 57 
JAMES SIMMONS, Yard Foreman, 

61st Street, Emp 2 26-51 
ROBERT SOSNOWSKI, Operator, 

Archer. Emp 5 28-46 
WILLIAM SPEER, Operator. 

Limits. Emp 5-7-48 
SAM SPIZZIRRI. Carpenter, 

West Shops, Emp 10-28-47 
RICHARD STYBURSKI, Machinist, 

Rail Shops, Emp 9-4-70 
FRANCIS SWIONTEK, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 4-30-46 



HANS TARCIKOWSKI, Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp 7 18-60 
ROBERT TOFT, Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp 3-17-47 
ERNEST TUCKER, Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 7-16-56 
ANTHONY UKOCKIS, Operator, 

Archer, Emp 9-24-47 
RONALD UTLEY, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 7-15-47 
ROBERT VANDERMEIR, Bus Repairer, 

North Park, Emp 1-28-49 
SAMUEL VAUGHAN, Claims Rep., 

Law/Claims, Emp 6-25-52 
THOMAS VUJNOVICH, Machinist, 

Rail Shops, Emp 10-16-46 
CHARLES WALKER, Operator, 

77th Street, Emp 6-26-51 
JEROME WALKER, Motorman, 

95th Dan Ryan. Emp 3-19-51 
WALTER WEBER, Bus & Truck Mech , 

South Shops, Emp 10 23 67 
GEORGE WELLING, Operator, 

Archer, Emp 5-15-46 
JOHN WILLIAMS, Electrolysis Tstr II, 

West Shops, Emp 8-31-50 
WILLIAM WITKUS, Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 9-11-45 
MARGARET ZAJAC, Bindery Worker, 

South Shops, Emp 1-10-77 
RICHARD ZAJAC, Sheet Metal Worker, 

South Shops. Emp 10 15 41 
THADDEUS ZDEB. Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp 311 4b 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 



MAYNARD BELL. Operator. 

52nd Street. Emp 2-27-69 
LAWRENCE DUNGCA, Operator, 

North Park. Emp 2-8-71 
CHARLES JONES, Bus Repairer, 

77th Street, Emp 8-29-69 



Service anniversaries 
in February 

40 years 

John Boland John Duffy 

Financial Services Central Counting 



30 years 




WiUie Carter, 77th Street 

Dorothy Doljanin, Stores West 

John Keane, South Shops 

Lawrence Page, 52nd Street 

Afidale Prince, South Section 

Clarence Riley, Equip, Engr & Maint. 

Ronald Shaw, Beverly 

Joseph Sparks, Fac Engr & Maint 

Edward Strugalla, Lawndale 

John Sullivan, Equip Engr & Maint. 

John Vogt, Beverly 



25 years 



John Pope 

Treasury 

35 years 

Lovance Ashley, Law 

John Capaccio, Foster 

Dominic Casalino, Rail System 

Chester Jones, 52nd Street 

Eugene Kennard, 77th Street 

Joseph Kovatz, 69th Street 

Antonio Tennelle, Distnct A 

Elvin White, Near South 

Teddy Wieczorek, Fac Engr & Maint 

Hezekiah Williams, District A 

Roy Williams, Pub Aff /Cons Srvcs 



Alfred Bohanon, Archer 
John Dopak, South Shops 
David Eggersdorf, Transportation 
George Griffin, Schedules 
Henry Hopkins, 69th Street 
John Kenna, District A 
Bernard Mazalewski, Forest Glen 
George O'Neill, Fac, Engr. & Maint. 
Mitchell Szalwa, Forest Glen 



GUISEPPE FASO, Rail Janitor, 

Madison & Wabash. Emp 1-9-67 
GEORGE FRAILLY. Craneman A. 

West Shops. Emp 3-27-41 
DOUGLASS GUEST. Money Handler, 

Central Counting. Emp. 12-10-48 
ARTHUR HUBACZ. Ace Anaylsis 
Clk Inspctr . 

Safety. Emp 11-4-42 
JOSPEH LASINSKI, Instructor, 

77th Street, Emp 6-18-48 
GEORGE MALARZ, Operator, 

Archer, Emp 3-24-60 
EUGENE MARCANTONIO, Conductor, 

West Section, Emp 1-19-49 
ZYGMUNT PRZYBYSZEWSKI, Trackman II, 

West Shops, Emp 12-20-66 
LUIS REYES. Car Repairman A, 

Harlem, Emp. 8-28-51 
NELSON SWOPES. Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 5-12-52 
WILLIAM TEUFEL. Serv. Trk. Chauf.,. 

West Shops. Emp. 1-16-51 
ELIAS WILLIAMS. Operator, 

Archer, Emp 9 27 51 



NEW PENSIONERS disability retirements 



JOSEPH CABRNOCH, Motorman, 

Douglas, Emp 6-3-63 
MORRIS COHEN, Ticket Agent, 

North Section. Emp. 4-16-66 
WILLIAM ELDRIDGE. Bus & Truck Mech 

South Shops. Emp 1-13-50 



ISMAEL NIEVES, Rail Janitor. 

Madison & Wabash, Emp 9-7-67 
ALVIN POTTS Jr , Operator. 

52nd Street. Emp 9-15-66 
•DONALD TOPOLINSKl, Signal 

Maint. .'Retroactive to 10-1-82 

West Shops. Emp 7-13-61 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



21 



More than 32 years of service is 
average for new CTA retirees 





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One hundred twenty-three CTA 
employees with an average of 32V2 
years service began collecting pen- 
sions in the new year as their re- 
tirements became effective January 1. 

Topping the list with most years of 
service was Maurice J. Buckley, a 
Law/Claims department claims repre- 
sentative who ended his CTA career 
after 44 years. Joining pensioners 
after nearly 42 years were Stanley C. 
Christ, rail superintendent at Forest 
Park, and Sigmund Dobosiewicz, a 
unit supervisor in Facilities Engineer- 
ing/Maintenance, West Shops. 

Herbert Lowenstein, area superin- 
tendent. Rail Service, also closed his 
career in rapid transit after 37 years. 
Lowenstein left the Air Force after the 
war to join the Chicago Rapid Transit 
Company as an extra guard on No- 
vember 1, 1945. 

He was instrumental in establishing 
additional instruction programs for rail 
supervisors. Lowenstein had served as 
a switchman and yard foreman before 
becoming a supervisor in 1953. In 
1964 he was named district supervi- 
sor, and in 1969, district superintend- 
ent. He was appointed area superin- 
tendent nine years later after having 
worked on every generation of rapid 
transit car from open-platform wood- 
en models to air-conditioned stainless 
steel. 



1 Retiring after 37 years of rail service, 

(Herbert Lowenstein and liis wife, Gertrude, 
were honored at a reception in the Trans 
portation Department office December 16. 



Paul Kadowaki (left), superintendent. Bus 
Training and Instruction, presents retire- 
ment package to Joseph Lasinski, bus 
instructor, during a retirement celebration 
for him at the 77th Street garage where he 
was assigned. Lasinski who retired after 
35 years, had the longest service record 
among instructors. William Thompson, 
assistant superintendent, Training and In- 
struction/South, also joined in the retire- 
ment celebration. 



Nikolas Karlos (left), and Edward Scott 
were honored at a December 30 retirement 
reception in the Howard terminal train 
room. Karlos became a pensioner after 14 
years with CTA as a janitor. Scott, a janitor 
foreman, retired after 25 years. 



22 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Ed Henry cuts the cake prepared for his 
retirement reception. His wife, Loretta 
shares the moment along with their 
daughter, Elaine (right). The reception was 
held in the CTA board room at the tVler- 
chandise Mart. 

In instruction, Joseph Lasinski, CTA 
station instructor with the longest con- 
tinuous service record, also retired 
effective February 1, after 35 years. 
Assigned to the 77th Street station. 
Lasinski joined CTA June 19, 1948 
as a motorman at Lawndale. He 
switched to buses and moved to Blue 
Island in 1950, but later returned to 
Lawndale. 

He was assigned to Archer garage in 
1953, and in 1960 was appointed 
supervisor of "B" district. Lasinski was 
named instructor in 1965. In that ca- 
pacity, his assignments included serv- 
ice at Kedzie, 77th Street. Archer, and 
reassignment to 77th Street where he 
closed his career. He plans to move to 
Mesa, Arizona in April. 

In the Safety department, Edward 
Henry, safety performance analysis 
supervisor was among those retiring 
effective January 1. Henry begins his 
retirement as CTA's accident rate 
drops to an all-time low of 5.5 per 
100,000 miles of operation, " — a 76 
per cent improvement over 35 years." 
he said. Henry noted that when he 
joined the CTA in 1948. the accident 
rate was 18.5 per 100.000 miles of 
operation. 



Pioneers plan '83 events 




Officials of the CTA Pioneers Retirement Club make plans for 1983 events. 
They are (from left) Warren Scholl. secretary: Melvin Horning, 1st vice president; 
Maynard "Pinky" Moran. president; George Nash, entertainment chairman; Carl 
Nelson. 2nd vice president; Walter Steinbeis. treasurer. 

The CTA Pioneers Retirement club has scheduled four Ladies Days meetings 
for the new year. The dates are February 8 — Valentine party; May 10 — Mother's 
day; September 13 — back to school, and December 13— Christmas party. 

Pinky Moran said all CTA retirees and friends are invited to attend the Pioneers' 
monthly luncheon meetings that are held on the second Tuesday of each month 
starting at 12:30 p.m. in the Golden Flame restaurant. Nagle and Higgins ave- 
nues. For more information, telephone Moran at 763-6379, 




As Salvatore J. Graziano of North Avenue garage prepared to close out his career as a bus 
operator after 30 years of service, grandsons Kevin Traxler (left), and Stephen Jadown 
boarded his Grand and Nordica bus to see what riding with granddad would be like. Other 
members of the Graziano family who stopped by North Avenue garage as the veteran bus 
operator boarded for his final run were his wife, Mrs. Rose Graziano; daughters Judy 
Jadown, Rosanne Graziano, and Diane Traxler, executive secretary, Labor Relations. 
Grazlano's retirement was effective January 1. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 1 & 2 



23 



eta EMPLOYEE COUNSELING PROGRAM 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 

"Goal" 
Keep people working 



• ALCOHOLISM 

• DRUGS 

• FINANCIAL 



'222-6114 
222-6115^ 



• LEGAL 

• MARITAL 

• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant otfiers 



CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 




svs 
o&ss 

■«^ -^ '■' -' 



"jV Full report next issue "5!^ 



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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Number 1 and 2 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Sen/ices Division. Michael 
N Horowitz. Group Manager 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment. Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jacit Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Artist: Alexandra Eiva 
Contributing Writers: Jeff Stern. 
Don Yabush, Ted Radakovic 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others. J5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734. Mer- 
chandise Marl Plaza. P.O. Box 3555. Chicago. Il- 
linois 60654. 



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7983 Volume 36-Number 3 

Transit News 



O'Hare Extension 
opens to River Rq 





Enjoying their ride hosted by Solomon Brown, 
conductor, Congress, are (from left) CTA Chair- 
man Michael Cardilli, Commissioner of Public 
Works Jerome Butler, and CTA Executive Director 
Bernard Ford. 

At Harlem station Ford and Cardilli discuss 
feeder bus service with northwest side resident 
Ann Gasper. 

CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli welcomes Tex and 
Debbie Bullock of Des Plaines who enjoyed the 
free rides with their sons Jason and Joshua. 



O'Hare Extension 



On the front cover, Helen Kasper and Rev. 
Joseph F. Schmeler, part-time chaplain at 
O'Hare International Airport, tell Cardilli 
that they will enjoy Greyhound bus service 
and faster commuting to O'Hare and down- 
town Chicago from the Cumberland station. 



Riders from the northwest side of 
Chicago and nearby suburbs enthusi- 
astically welcomed rapid transit service 
to the new O'Hare Extension during 
CTA's free ride introductory celebra- 
tion on Saturday, Feb. 26. From 10 
am, until 3 p.m.. four-car 2600-series 
rapid transit trains provided free shut- 
tle service between the Harlem Ave- 
nue, Cumberland Avenue, and River 
Road stations. 

CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli, 
CTA Executive Director Bernard Ford, 
and City of Chicago Commissioner of 
Public Works Jerome Butler greeted 
riders and inspected the new facilities. 
Employees from Operations Planning 



and Public Affairs/Consumer Services 
were on hand to answer riders' ques- 
tions and distribute brochures describ- 
ing the new rapid transit service. CTA 
and RTA feeder bus services, and Park 
'n' Ride and Kiss 'n' Ride facilities. 

Most riders cited shorter commut- 
ing times to Downtown Chicago and 
O'Hare International Airport as the 
greatest advantages of the O'Hare 
Extension, while others offered sug- 
gestions for improving the newly insti- 
tuted feeder bus services. 

The first revenue service 'A' train left 
River Road station at 3:31 a.m., Sun- 
day, Feb. 27, for its trip to the Dear- 
born Street Subway downtown and 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




At Harlem station Cardilli compliments the work of (from left) "Rudy" Roundez, bus service 
supervisor, Thomas Cameron, rail janitor foreman, and Robert Krejca, rail janitor. 




Bill Nigut, WLS-TV (channel 7), interviews Michael Horowitz, group manager. Public Affairs/ 
Consumer Services, at River Road station. 



the Desplaines terminal at the end of 
the Congress line in west suburban 
Forest Park. Since that time, ridership 
figures have proven the value of the 
O'Hare Extension. 

Daily average ridership figures for 
weekdays during the first week of serv- 
ice indicate that 3900 riders board at 
Harlem. 4500 at Cumberland, and 
4100 at River Road. As expected, 
4300 fewer riders now board at Jeffer- 
son Park because they find the new 
stations to be more convenient. Over- 
all the O'Hare Extension has brought 
8200 new weekday riders to the line. 
Ridership has also increased by 5700 
riders on Saturdays and 3800 riders 



on Sundays. 

Later this summer, rapid transit 
service will be extended for the re- 
maining 2.5 miles to the O'Hare Sub- 
way Terminal under the main parking 
garage at O'Hare international Airport 
providing a direct rapid transit connec- 
tion between the airport and down- 
town Chicago. 

The 7.9 mile O'Hare Extension is 
being built by the City of Chicago, 
Department of Public Works, at a cost 
of $196 million, with funding provided 
by the U.S. Urban Mass Transpor- 
tation Administration and the Illinois 
Department of Transportation. 



From the Chairman 



Milestones 



It has been more than a decade 
since CTA opened the Kennedy and 
Dan Ryan rapid transit services, and 1 
consider it a great privilege to be CTA 
Chairman at a time when we can once 
again offer expanded service to the 
people of Chicago by opening the 
O'Hare Extension. We are already ex- 
periencing increased ridership on the 
line, and we are looking forward to the 
added dimension of service that will 
arrive later this year when we provide 
direct rapid transit service to O'Hare 
International Airport. 

1 congratulate all CTA employees 
from all departments who contributed 
to the design, planning, preparation, 
operation, and promotion of the O'Hare 
Extension. It was a job well done. I 
also compliment the City of Chicago. 
Department of Public Works, for the 
functional and aesthetic excellence 
that they built into this new addition to 
our transit system. 

The free-ride day at Harlem. Cum- 
berland, and River Road stations was 
a tremendous success. 1 thoroughly 
enjoyed meeting many current CTA 
riders and new CTA riders who en- 
thusiastically welcomed our new serv- 
ice and plan to use it regularly. Most 
importantly. 1 was proud to meet many 
of our employees who will be working 
in the O'Hare Extension area and 
observe their professionalism and 
dedication. The pressures that were 
exerted on all of us for an effective 
opening were great, and all of us at 
CTA reacted in the most professional 
manner. Again. 1 thank and congratu- 
late all of you. 

All CTA employees, especially those 
who work in safety, transportation, 
and maintenance, can take pride in 
the hard work and attention to duty 
that enabled CTA to reach another 
milestone of professionalism. January 
of 1983 was the safest operating month 
in CTA's entire history. Preliminary 
figures for February also indicate that 
this high level of safety consciousness 
is continuing, and I commend all of 
you for your efforts. Safety is one of 
our most important goals, because it 
inspires confidence in CTA service 
among our riders. 



^^2«>^5<i 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 3 



CTA reports record low accident rate in January 



January can be a hazardous time for 
getting around Chicago, but January, 
1983, turned out to be the best month 
ever for CTA buses and trains. CTA 
vehicles encountered the fewest ac- 
cidents for any month on record since 
CTA began operations in 1947. 

CTA employees set an all-time low 
monthly traffic and passenger accident 
rate this January, for an average of 
3.98 per 100.000 miles of operation. 
This was a significant improvement 
even over the fair weather month of 
September, 1982, which had been the 



previously best month, with a rate of 
4.8 accidents per 100,000 miles. 

Safety Department Manager Tom 
Boyle said that although the weather 
in January was mild compared to the 
same month in years past, the safety 
record achieved was nonetheless im- 
pressive because of the broad range of 
employees who contributed to it. 

"This outstanding performance 
would not have been possible without 
the combined efforts of Transportation 
operating personnel, supervisors and 
instructors. Maintenance and Safety 



personnel, and others." he said. 
"Everyone involved can take credit, 
since none could have done it by 
themselves." 

Boyle said CTA buses carried riders 
over almost 6.5 million miles of streets 
in January, 1983, while trains oper- 
ated a little less than 4 million miles 
during the same period. He noted that 
the low accident rate was "particularly 
gratifying during the present economic 
conditions" because of the resulting 
reduction in accident claims and equip- 
ment repair costs. 




Roadeo contestants driving through the 
off-set street maneuver at Soldier Field 
during the 1981 finals. 



Bill Thompson, 1983 CTA Bus 
Roadeo Chairman and superintend- 
ent. Bus Instruction, reports that this 
year's Bus Roadeo program is well 
underway. 

Applications for the competition 
were received by garage superintend- 
ents from March 1 through March 15, 
and the written test covering CTA op- 
erating procedures, defensive driving 
principles, and Rules of the Road will 
be administered to qualified applicants 
at Limits Training Center, April 4-16. 

Garage level preliminary driving 
competitions will be held at two CTA 
locations on the weekends of June 4th 
and 5th, and June 11th and 12th. 
These competitions will determine the 



top 20 bus operators or "Winning Cir- 
cle 20," who will compete in the CTA 
Bus Roadeo Finals to be held later this 
summer in the Soldier Field south 
parking lot. 

The winner of the CTA Bus Roadeo 
Finals will receive an all-expense paid 
trip for two to Denver, Colo., where 
he or she will compete as CTA's rep- 
resentative in the American Public 
Transit Association (APTA) Inter- 
national Bus Roadeo. Other prizes in- 
cluding trophies and savings bonds 
will be awarded in the same manner as 
last year. 

The two co-chairmen of the 1981 
and 1982 CTA Bus Roadeo commit- 
tees, Elonzo Hill, director, Training 



and Instruction, and Paul Kadowaki, 
area superintendent. Instruction, along 
with Robert Desvignes. director, Ad- 
ministration and Performance Con- 
trol, now form the CTA Bus Roadeo 
Advisory Committee. Hill is also 
CTA's representative on the APTA In- 
ternational Bus Roadeo Committee. 

CTA Scoring for APTA 

At the winter meeting of the APTA 
International Bus Roadeo Commit- 
tee in Denver, Feb. 3-5, Elonzo Hill 
presented samples of the 1982 CTA 
Bus Roadeo score sheets. The well- 
planned, thorough score sheets, in- 
cluding scoring for each roadeo man- 
euver, inspection, quiz, written test. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



'Card Sharks' put bite on 
phony monthly passes 




Gordon Butler 



John Paczkowski 



Gordon Butler and John Paczkowski are among the 
leaders in a growing number of employees who can be 
proud to be called "card sharks." These employees can spot 
a phony monthly riding card almost in an instant, and they 
have also been successful in confiscating the illegal cards. 

Butler is a South District ticket agent on the extra board. 
Paczkowski is an operator at Archer garage. 

Since January 1, Paczkowski has signed complaints 
against more than 15 persons. Since the monthly pass pro- 
gram began in 1978. Paczkowski has signed complaints and 
testified in court more than 125 times against persons 
arrested on a charge of theft of services. 

Butler said that he has testified in court against persons 
with phony passes "more times than I can remember. 

"Most of the persons arrested are held in police station 
lockups overnight and taken to court the next day. Many of 
them are sentenced to court probation, but spending the 
night behind bars usually convinces them to buy only legal 
monthly passes from CTA authorized outlets." 

Through their diligence and observation, "card sharks" 
like Butler and Paczkowski and other CTA employees who 
identify and confiscate phony passes help insure that CTA 
receives all the income that it rightfully deserves for services 
provided to our riders. 



and cumulative scores, were accepted 
by APTA and will be adapted for use 
as the official 1983 APTA International 
Bus Roadeo score sheets. 

The CTA score sheets were de- 
signed by Hill, Kadowaki, Kelsey 
King, transportation planning analyst, 
and the Forms Design unit of CTA's 
Management Services department. 

Volunteer judges needed 

Management, professional, and 
other non-operating employees may 
participate in the CTA Bus Roadeo as 
volunteer judges for the garage level 
driving competitions on June 4, 5, 11, 
and 12. Judging is a great chance to 
watch the intense Bus Roadeo compe- 
tition up close and meet other employ- 
ees from throughout CTA. Anyone 
wishing to volunteer as a Roadeo 
judge should call Bill Mooney at ext. 
4150 in the Merchandise Mart or Bill 
Thompson at ext. 276 or 277, 77th 
Street garage 

Employees who cannot participate 
as judges, but would like to stop by 
and watch the garage level competi- 
tions, are also welcome. 




Louis Bleniek, instructor at Forest Glen Garage, logs in starting order numbers drawn by 
contestants for the first CTA Bus Roadeo held in 1981. 



7983 Vo/. 36- No. 3 



■■■■EJaiBiiBi 

Datacenter *monster' 
finds new home 

How do you treat a "monster" computer processor stuffed 
with 16 million bites of information, that has 16 channels of 
communications to 70 on-line computer-related devices and 
up to 250 computer terminals? 

John Hogan, manager of the CTA's Datacenter, smiled at 
that question. 

"If you're smart, you'll treat the computer processor like 
you would a wealthy old aunt— very gently," Hogan said. 

His analogy of CTA's IBM 3033 computer processor that 
he affectionately calls the "monster" and the wealthy old 
aunt is pretty accurate. To keep its "monster" happily hum- 
ming, the Datacenter uses two transformers. These provide 
the computer processor with its steady "diet" of high-voltage 
electric power and smooth out any irregularities in current 
from the Commonwealth Edison Company. 

Besides a steady diet of energy, the "monster" also craves 
a steady temperature of 72 degrees, with variations of no 
more than two degrees below or above 72. Humidity must 
stay at 42 per cent, with variations of no more than four per 
cent below or above 42. 

So what happens to the "monster" if there is a critical 
change in electrical power, temperature, and humidity? 
Hogan came up with another analogy to explain his highly 
complex Datacenter operations. 

"Rapid transit trains have automatic train control devices 
that govern the speed and distance of trains. If a train's 
motorman should disregard the ATC's pre-set controls on 





New location provides adequate space for tape library and storage 
facilities. 



Leo White (left), director of operations, Datacenter, and John 
Hogan, manager, Datacenter, inspect one of many new compo- 
nents at the Datacenter's new 440 N. Wells St. location. 

his train, the ATC takes control of the train and brings it to a 
stop to prevent a potentially dangerous situation." he said. 

"The ' monster ' will shut itself down if current, tempera- 
ture, or humidity levels are violated. This shut-down pro- 
tects its micro-bites of information as well as its circuitry to its 
interconnected devices and terminals from a potentially 
damaging situation." 

Hogan's use of the term "monster" refers not to the com- 
puter processor's size but to its ability to act as a brain for 
the CTA's far-flung computer operations serving nearly all 
departments, rail yards, bus garages, payroll, etc. Computer 
experts, such as Leo White, director of the Datacenter. view 
the "monster" as a marvel of miniaturization and a wonder- 
ous device that makes their temperatures rise (not more 
than two degrees, please). 

But, for the layman, looking at the IBM 3033 is about as 
exciting as watching paint dry. Its calm exterior gives no in- 
dication of the frenzy of electronic activity going on inside. 
Hogan and White and their staff members just went through 
a delicate balance of necessities. 

Since 1973, the Datacenter had been located in 10,000 
square feet of office space on the 15th floor of the CNA 
Building at 55 E. Jackson Blvd. As CTA increased its use of 
computers for monitoring everything from the time spent by 
a mechanic changing a bus engine's oil to making up its 
multi-million dollar annual budget, the Datacenter outgrew 
its space. Fortunately, 15,000 square feet of space became 
available in a rehabbed building at 440 N. Wells St., just 
north of the Merchandise Mart, and a long-term lease was 
successfully negotiated by the CTA. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



iDBlS ■■■■■■■ 

"Our Datacenter operates 24 hours a day," White said. 
"Because most of our equipment on Jackson was cumber- 
some and outmoded, we decided to bring in new, state of 
the art computers and equipment and install them in the 
Wells street facility and have it ready when we moved." 

CTA sold most of the older equipment at the Jackson of- 
fice and about 15 per cent of the remaining equipment and 
materials were moved in 37 truckloads on February 11 and 
February 15. 

"Besides the two days it took to move the computer com- 
ponents, equipment and files, our movers spent three days 
packing and unpacking the truckloads of materials," said 
Tom Coyne, special projects coordinator. Management 
Services department. "This was the largest movement of 
equipment in the recently completed remodeling and relo- 
cation program we conducted for the CTA's headquarters 
facilities." 

Besides material and equipment, the move involved the 
100 employees of the Datacenter, some of whom work on 





Telephone feed unit provides data exchange between central com- 
puter facilities and remote locations throughout CTA system. 



..dala 



Arlene Jenny, superintendent, operations and control; Reginald 
Smith, senior data communications specialist; and Robert Bratek, 
lead systems programmer, discuss data processing operations 
with a vendor's representative in the data processing control 
center. 
rotating shifts. 

Looking back on the move from Jackson to Wells, Hogan 
said: "This move was a tremendous undertaking involving 
the close cooperation of many people throughout CTA. This 
close working relationship within CTA allowed this move to 
be made in a very short period of time with only a moderate 
disruption of computer service." 

Larry Pianto, group manager. Administration, praised the 
work of Hogan and White for their efforts to keep the vital 
computer services operating during the relocation of the 
Datacenter. 

The "monster" now has a new home, where it will con- 
tinue to serve all of CTA's data processing needs. 




Miles of cable were required to complete the installation of data 
processing equipment at the new location. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 3 





Controller 
takes pride in 
dual careers 

The quiet reserve and matter-of-fact 
approach to his job is an indication of 
the depth of rail/bus controller Derrick 
Robinson's sense of pride in his trans- 
portation career, and his patriotism as 
an American. 

Robinson, a 14-year CTA veteran, 
is a U.S. Army reservist assigned to 
the 12th Special Forces Group in Ar- 
lington Heights. The Special Forces, 
better known to most by their familiar 
headdress, the "Green Beret," are 
among the most respected soldiers in 
the U.S. Army. They are highly skilled, 
and they take their business seriously. 

On Sunday, February 13, this refined 
military unit demonstrated its skills 
over the west-northwest suburban com- 
munity of Streamwood. Robinson and 
some 45 other reservists, representing 
a variety of civilian occupations, leaped 
from two Army UH-1 Huey helicop- 
ters as the aircraft leveled off at 1,500 
feet over Streamwood Park District 
property. The unit performed as a 
team with each individual demonstrat- 
ing concern for the welfare of his com- 
rades during the mission. 

"Full time soldiers have nothing on 
us as far as preparedness. We train as 
well as anybody, and we don't have as 
much time, so really we are in many 
ways better prepared than some active 
duty units," said Robinson. "No one 
can ever take away our berets or our 
wings." 

As a rail/bus controller, also serving 
in the capacity of acting superintend- 
ent of Control, Robinson does what 
must be done to keep the system mov- 
ing and provide CTA patrons with con- 
venient, on-time service. Likewise, as 
a member of the 12th Special Forces, 
he does what is necessary to maintain 
a readiness posture for deterring any 
potentially aggressive force. 

"I have acquired 11 years of military 
service, and 1 continue to be a profes- 
sional soldier without any regrets. It's 
like the transportation business— once 
it gets into your blood, it's there for 
good. " he said. 

His military career has run the 
gamut of experiences from instructing 
soldiers in the use of small arms and 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



"It's like the transportation 
business — once it gets into 
your blood, it's there 
for good." 




{ 



other weapons, and the employment 
of maneuvers and tactics, to participat- 
ing in maneuvers and airborne opera- 
tions which require exiting from such 
high performance aircraft as the Air 
Force's C-130 and C-123 Hercules, 
the C-141 Starlifter jet, and the Army's 
Hercules Prop and UH-1 Huey 
helicopters. 

A Viet Nam service veteran. Ser- 
geant Robinson earned 16 field deco- 
rations for gallantry in action, includ- 
ing the coveted Silver Star, one of the 
nation's highest honors for combat 
service beyond the call of duty. 

His other decorations include the 
Air Medal, the Army Commendation 
Medal, Purple Heart, Combat Badge, 
and the Unit and Presidential Cita- 
tions. Sergeant Robinson is credited 
with more than 100 air missions span- 
ning both combat and peacetime 
service. 




He was ordered to Viet Nam in 
1968. only a year after being inducted 
into the Army and completing his basic 
training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. 
He was assigned to a reconnaissance 
platoon with the Fourth Infantry Divi- 
sion in the Central Highlands at Plieku, 
where he assumed duties as a section 
leader and was later named platoon 
sergeant 

As a member of the 12th Special 
Forces Group he serves with the only 
airborne unit in the Chicagoland area. 
The Green Berets are frequently called 



upon for appearances at festive oc- 
casions such as Armed Forces Day 
observances and civilian related ac- 
tivities. Among public demonstra- 
tions conducted by the unit last year 
was rappelling from atop Chicago's 
City Hall. 

Robinson joined CTA in 1969 as a 
bus operator and was later named to a 
position as surface supervisor. Since 
joining the Control Center as a rail- 
bus controller six years ago, he has 
proven to be as tireless a transporta- 
tion teamworker as he is a teamworker 
with his military comrades. "He is a 
hard worker and is always available," 
said Superintendent of Control Jerry 
Johnson. 

Robinson's pride in his two careers 
is exceeded only by the pride which 
beams when he speaks of his family. 
He and his wife, Marjorie. are the 
parents of a daughter, Rae. 14, and 
two sons. Derrick II, 12. and Phillip. 7. 





1983 Vol. 36-No. 3 



Commendation Corner 



Larry Payton (52nd Street 
garage) was praised for his 
skill as operator of a No. 6 
Jeffery Express bus that 
Ruth Harris was taking to her 
office on South Dearborn 
Street. "At about 41st Street, 
there was a loud noise and 
the bus began to lurch and 
list to one side. The driver 
kept the bus under control 
and slowed down only when 
it was safe to do so. All the 
seats were filled and the 
aisle was filled with stand- 
ees, yet not one person fell 
into the aisle or out of a seat. 
When we alighted, we discov- 
ered that the two left rear tires 
had blown out. Mr. Payton 
has my grateful thanks." 




Felix Mafias (Archer garage) 
has the approval of Mickey 
DiMaso, of West 47th Street, 
who is a regular rider on his 
No. 162 Pulaski/Stevenson 
Express bus. "This gentle- 
man brightens up my day 
with a courteous smile and a 
friendly 'Hello' every morning. 
I am a firm believer in giving 
compliments when they are 
deserved, and he truly de- 
serves one. I commend this 
gentleman on his care for 
people. He makes me and 
other riders feel not just like 
any other passenger, but like 
an individual. He really takes 
his job to heart. I commend 
him on his performance. He 
is a great human being." 



Tyree Cobb Jr. (Limits garage) was thanked for his 
vigilance as operator of a No. 8 Halsted bus by Mrs. Ralph 
Paidock, of Union Avenue. "All of a sudden he announced, 
'Let me have your undivided attention! Watch your purses, 
wallets and valuables! Hold on tight. I have been hoping this 
announcement would come over the speaker system about 
every half hour or so. At least this wonderful driver an- 
nounced it. If I— an old lady— can spot pickpockets, I am 
sure the drivers can, too. And I wish they would alert the 
people on the bus just as this driver did. Thank you for this 
wonderful, considerate driver." 

Melvin Payne (77th Street garage) is admired by Mrs. 
Luesther Chapman, of East 82nd Street, for his courtesy as 
operator of a No. 4 Cottage Grove bus. "He is my Sunday 
blessing. His smile is infectious, and if a frown is on your 
face, it would disappear with the happiness you receive 
from him. He is an example of what a man should be, and is 
an asset to your establishment. He has respect for the elders, 
a spoken word upon entering the bus, and a 'Have a good 
day' when departing. He is a public servant doing human 
service. I hope he never changes." 

Seymour Hoffman (North Park garage) was the operator 
of a No. 97 Skokie bus that David Zander, of Minneapolis, 
rode on a recent visit to Chicago. "When 1 boarded the bus, 
I didn't know the fare, where to transfer to the 'L,' what train 
to take, what stop to get off at, etc. Your driver answered all 
my questions courteously and accurately. I had no problem 
getting to where 1 wanted to go. returning, or going back 
over the next few days. Furthermore, he was courteous to 
all passengers, waited for several people running for the 
bus, and drove smoothly, and not too fast. He is a credit to 
your organization." 



Robert Surita (77th Street garage) is appreciated by Mrs. 
Eunice Wigfall, of Dobson Avenue, for his performance as 
operator of a No. 79 79th bus. "He is one of the most pleas- 
ant and courteous men on the line. He calls the stops and 
goes all out to make your trip as comfortable as he can. It 
would be wonderful if you had more operators like him. It is 
indeed a pleasure boarding his bus. He is certainly worthy of 
all praises. I told him how pleased I was, but 1 wanted to let 
CTA Personnel know this as well. There are so many nega- 
tive things happening that when something positive hap- 
pens you must report it also." 

Alex Carter Jr. (77th Street garage) was complimented 
by CO. Jones, of Lafayette Avenue, for his courtesy and 
dependability as operator of a No. 95W 95th bus. "He has 
been arriving at the same time each morning at my stop. He 
is an employee whom 1 consider exceptional. Other passen- 
gers have commented that it is wonderful to begin the day 
without having one's blood pressure elevated. I do not own 
an automobile, so the CTA is an integral part of my daily 
existence. Dependable public transportation, such as that 
provided by No. 2819, is vital, since I must depart for work 
at 4:55 a.m. daily." 

Angel Beenn (Archer garage) was commended by Elena 
Spukas, of Glen Ellyn, "for the courteous, polite and con- 
siderate manner in which he does his job" as operator of a 
No. 129 North Western/Franklin bus. "We, as the public, 
often take it for granted that you are here to serve, to take 
the brunt of our everyday mishaps and attitudes. It is a 
pleasure to board a bus and be greeted by a driver who 
makes us realize we are particular persons he is happy to 
share a small amount of time with, and we can relax know- 
ing we are under the care of someone concerned for our 
welfare." 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Honor seven on "A Day in CTA" 




Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick 
(left), welcomes "A Day in CTA" honorees 
to the rail/bus control center for a tour. 
Tfie honorees are Bus Operator Larnzell 
Harper (second from left), alternate team 
leader. Driver Safety program. Limits 
garage; Ticket Agent Brenda J. Dunmore, 
and Bus Operator Giles Liddell, Team 
Leader, Driver Safety progam, Limits. 



Fortunately, Charles Pennington, a 
regular CTA rider, was within sight of 
CTA ticket agent Brenda J. Dunmore 
when he collapsed into a diabetic 
coma near Clybourne and North 
avenue. 

Ms. Dunmore went to Pennington's 
aid by recovering $600 in cash from 
him for safekeeping until the stricken 
rider was well enough to conduct 
his own personal affairs again. Ms. 
Dunmore was commended for her 
alert response to the man's needs by 
policemen who were summoned to 
help, and received special CTA recog- 
nition as "A Day in CTA" honoree. 

Other "Day in CTA" honorees are 
Giles Liddell, and Larnzell Harper, 
Limits garage's Driver Safety program 
leader and alternate leader of Team 
Two. Last September Liddell and 
Harper managed their team to a 
record of zero accidents for a 30-day 
period. 

To improve team communication, 
Team Leader Liddell divided opera- 
tors of Team Two into groups of nine 
and appointed individual group lead- 
ers. The idea worked, and Limits had 
its best safety record ever. 

Car Repairer Richard Plomin, 
Harlem Shop, received "A Day in 
CTA" honors for detecting a condition 
during an inspection of a rail car which 




Equipment Engineering and Maintenance department employees receiving special recogni- 
tion as "A Day In CTA" honorees showf off their certificates during a tour of the control 
center. They are (from left). Bus Repairer Robert Bosco, Bus Servicer Charles Williams, and 
Car Repairers, Earl Johnson, and Richard Plomin. 



could have caused a derailment if it 
had not been corrected. 

At DesPlaines Shop, Car Repairer 
Earl Johnson received special recogni- 
tion on "A Day in CTA" for extin- 
guishing a fire aboard a train in the 
DesPlaines yard. Johnson, dressed in 
street clothing, was about to join his 
family waiting for him nearby when 
the fire occurred. 



Two other Equipment Engineering/ 
Maintenance department employees 
received "A Day in CTA recognition 
for having five-year perfect attendance 
records. They are Charles Williams, 
bus servicer, 69th Street garage, a 
CTA employee for 25 years, and 
Robert Bosco, bus repairer, 69th 
Street garage, an employee for 19 
years. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 3 



Public Safety 

Public Safety Awards for the fourth 
quarter of 1982 were presented to 
Beverly garage and Douglas terminal. 
It was the second straight PSA for 
Beverly, and the 19th time the gar- 
age's employees have won the award 
since its inception in 1961. 

The south side garage won the 
award with a traffic rate of 3.47 ac- 
cidents per 100,000 miles during the 
quarter, a 30 per cent better rate than 
the entire bus system rate of 4.97. 

Beverly experienced a passenger 
rate of 0.51. In other words, the gar- 
age was involved in only one accident 
for every 200,000 miles of operation. 
This rate was 64 per cent better than 
the system rate of 1.40 (per 100,000 
miles). Beverly had 56 accident-free 
days during the fourth quarter. 

During the fourth quarter of 1982, 
Douglas terminal was involved in three 
accidents, giving it the PSA. This was 
the ninth time Douglas won the 
award. They last won the award for 
the first quarter of 1982. 

Douglas won with a combined traffic 
and passenger frequency rate of 0.380 
(per 100,000 car miles). This rate was 
11 per cent lower than the rail system 
rate. In other words, Douglas had one 
accident for every 300,000 miles of 
operation during the fourth quarter. It 
also had 89 accident-free days during 
that period. 




At Douglas Terminal, Outstanding Rail Employee Ellglo Danda receives congratulations 
from CTA Executive Director Bernard J. Ford (left) and Transportation Manager Harry 
Reddrick. Maury Adams (not shown) also received an Outstanding Employee Award. 




Transportation employees celebrating Quarterly Safety Awards at Beverly Garage are, from 
left, Paul Kadowaki, area superintendent, Instruction; Flarzell Moore, assistant superin- 
tendent, Beverly; Outstanding Employee Award recipients Gus Wrigtit and James l^iller, 
bus operators; Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick; and Superintendent, Beverly, Burnett 
Henderson. Representing the Safety department (background) were Rich Pyllewicz, sys- 
tems safety monitor-inspector, and Tom Boyle, manager, Safety. 



Thanks— for a 
job well done 

Employees who tiave received commendations 
since thie last listing 

Julio Adorno, North Park 
Maria Agnew, North Park 
Daniel Allen, 69th Street 
Amparo Alvarez, Forest Glen 
Katie Avery, North Avenue 



Even Barber, North Avenue 
Vera Beckley, 52nd Street 
Carmen Betances, North Park 
Vicki Bledsoe, Howard/Kimball 
Samuel Boyd, Beverly 
Robert Brown, North Park 
Matthew Brownlee, District B 
Adolph Buss, West Section 



Jean Cage, North Park 
Eddie Carey, North Avenue 
Earl Carson, North Park 
Eloise Carter, 77th Street 
Wafer Carter, 69th Street 
Jessie Cavanero, North Park 
Arthur Chavez, Ashland Terminal 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Roosevelt Conklin, Archer 
Richard Corbett, Howard/Kimball 

Travis Dixon, 77th Street 
Josef Dornseifer, Limits 
R^cardo Douglas, Limits 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Wilfred Dupree, North Park 

Helen Edwards, North Section 
Casper Elder Jr., Ashland Terminal 
Virginia Enriquez, Archer 

Michael Fleming, Howard/Kimball 



James Gaines, 52nd Street 
Odell Granger, Forest Glen 
Columbus Gray Jr., 69th Street 

Willie Hanson, Beverly 
Clois Harper, 69th Street 
Cornelius Haywood, Limits 
Ray Helm, Beverly 
Gregory Hoard, Forest Glen 

Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Jerry Jenkins, North Park 
Daniel Joseph, North Park 

Robert Kremer. North Park 

Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Jesus Limas, North Park 
Tilmon Lloyd Jr., Lawndale 
Robert Long, 69th Street 
Raul Lopez, North Park 
Ruben Lopez, North Park 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



RTA affiliated personnel participate in CTA training 




RTA instructor trainees hold graduation certificates in Board Room ceremony attended by (back row, left to right): Paul Oppenheim, RTA; Ed 
Mitchell, director. Training and Utility; instructors Nathaniel Payne and George Zajaczkowski; Robert McCreary, president. Commuter Bus 
Systems; and Harry Reddrick, manager. Transportation. 



A graduation ceremony was held in 
the CTA Board Room December 10 
for nine RTA-affiliated bus people who 
participated in a 13-session instructor 
training program. 

The program was carried out under 
the supervision of Elonzo Hill, superin- 
tendent, Training Center, by instructors 
Nathaniel Payne, George Zajaczkowski, 
and John McClain. Besides standard 
CTA instructor training, participants 
were taught driving techniques as well 
as follow-up and retraining procedures. 

The training was requested by Paul 
Oppenheim, Department Manager, 



RTA Bus Operations, in an effort to 
establish standards of training for vari- 
ous RTA carriers. Before RTA was 
established, Oppenheim said, "Most 
suburban bus companies were just 
struggling along living out of the fare 
box. They didn't have anything left for 
extras, such as formal training. 

"With the advent of RTA," he 
added, "there were more resources, 
and we saw the need to begin to revive 
some of the lost services. With the 
type of help we're getting from CTA, 
we're now able to develop our own 



training programs. 

Among the instructor trainees were 
James and Jeanne Robaus, who to- 
gether own and operate the Westway 
Coach Co.. of Villa Park, and Steve 
Heins, of Commuter Bus Systems, of 
Lombard, both RTA contract carriers. 

Other participants were Terry Tarr. 
of Highland Park; Daniel Koncelski. of 
Suburban Transit System, Inc.; Peter 
Kommer, of West Towns; Brian Langer, 
of Aurora Transit; Albert Atkins, of 
Waukegan, and Patricia Judice. of the 
RTA Paratransit Department. 



Roy Madison, Beverly 
Randolph Malloy, 77th Street 
Tyrone Malloy, North Avenue 
Cornelius Marshall, North Park 
Marvin Marshall, 69th Street 
Lester McCarty, 77th Street 
Eddie McMillan, Archer 
Joseph McMillan, 52nd Street 
Kevin Mitchell, Forest Park 
Hermilo Montes, Limits 
Louis Montgomery, North Avenue 
Fructuoso Moreno, Limits 
James Moses Jr., North Avenue 

Willie Nash, 69th Street 

Frederick Owens, 52nd Street 

John Paczkowski, Archer 
Amos Pearson, Limits 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Henry Person, North Avenue 
Charles Peterson, 77th Street 



Davis Price, Howard/Kimball 
Jackie Pritt, Rail District North 
James Pruitt, 77th Street 

Billy Ragsdale, 52nd Street 
Jerry Reed, North Avenue 
Ivan Rodez, North Park 
Frank Rodgers, North Park 
Jose Rodriguez, North Avenue 
Ramon Rodriguez, North Park 

Paul Sampson, Archer 
Francis Schaefer, Archer 
Nora Scott, North Avenue 
James Skinner, North Avenue 
Michael Smith, Archer 
Edwin Sosa, North Park 
Robert Spann, North Park 
Robert Surita, 77th Street 

Blanca Torres, Forest Glen 
Mamie Twine, North Section 



Robert Vazquez, North Park 

Dean Walcott, North Park 
Mary Wallace, North Park 
Levi Wardell, Howard/ Kimball 
eleven Wardlow, Limits 
Willie Wardlow, Forest Glen 
Early Watson Jr., Archer 
Eddie White, 77th Street 
Nelson White Jr., North Park 
James Wilson, Washington Garage 
Leroy Wilson Jr., 52nd Street 
Byron Winburn, Rail Instruction 
John Winkler, North Park 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 
James Young, North Avenue 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 
Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



7983 \/Ql. 36-No. 3 



^ 



Register now for 
1983 CTA Softball 




Forest Glen 'Blazers': 1982 CTA Softball Champions 

Registration for the 1983 CTA Softball League is open for 
all teams, announced Joe Gale, sports coordinator for the 
sports recreation program of the A.T.U. Divisions 241 and 
308. Deadline for entering a team in the competition is 
May 1, Gale said. 

Each team can register by filing an entry blank and a $100 
fee with Gale at the Forest Glen garage via CTA mail. Each 
entry must have a team name: work location; name of team 
coach, his address and telephone number, team manager, 
his address and telephone number. The $100 fee helps pay 
the league's expenses, trophies, and awards. 

Gale said the CTA Softball season starts Sunday, May 15, 
and games will be played in Washington Park, 5500 S. 
King Dr. 



Forest Glen 'Blazers': 1982 Champs 

Winners of the 1982 season. Gale reported with modesty, 
were the Forest Glen Blazers; Gale is player-coach of the 
Blazers. 

"The Blazers were the doormats (last placers) for the soft- 
ball league for 12 years. In 1978, the team caught fire and 
won its first league championship. The team has been hot 
ever since." 

Players on the Blazers are Roosevelt Wright, assistant 
coach; Willie Smith and Danell Smith, co-captains; Melvin 
Sanders; Everett Brown; George McCarthy; Gregory 
Hoard; Fred Harris; William Mandeldove; Harold Pierce; 
John Pieikielko; Clarence Golden; Sam Miller; Robert 
Christner, and Lawrence Turner. 



1983 CTA Softball 
A.T.U. Div. 241-308 
Sports Recreation Program 



TEAM NAME: 



ENTRY 
BLANK 



WORK LOCATION: 

TEAM COACH: 

ADDRESS: 



PHONE: 



TEAM MANAGER: 
ADDRESS: 



PHONE: 



Return to Joe Gale, Sports Coordinator. Forest Glen Garage, 
via compani; mail. 



Your Health 




About bums 



by Linda C. Lapid, RN 
CTA Medical Dept. 

Burns are wounds produced by 
various kinds of thermal, electrical, 
radioactive, or chemical agents. These 
agents kill cells by changing the protein 
substance of the cell. 

Burns may be sustained in different 
intensities, namely first, second, and 
third degree. 

First degree burn: The skin is red- 
dened but intact. It is painful with 
minimal or no edema (excessive ac- 



cumulation of fluid in the tissue). 
Complete recovery usually within a 
week. 

Second degree burn: The skin is 
blistered with redness, edema, and is 
very painful. Infection may occur. 
Recovery usually in two to three 
weeks with scarring. 

Third degree burn: Skin is dry. pale 
white or charred. There may be areas 
with fat exposed and severe edema, 
but pain is minimal. The nerves 
underneath the skin are severely 
damaged, thus decreasing the 
person's ability to feel pain. Skin 
grafting is necessary. There is scarring, 
loss of contour and function of the af- 
fected area, a high probability of infec- 
tion, and long-term recovery. 

Once a burn has been sustained, the 
application of cold is the best first aid 



measure. Running cold tap water, 
soaking burned area in ice water, or 
applying cold towels will give im- 
mediate relief from pain and restrict 
further tissue damage. 

The burn should be covered as 
quickly as possible to minimize 
bacterial contamination and to 
decrease pain by preventing air from 
coming in contact with the injured sur- 
face. Sterile dressings are best, but any 
clean dry cloth may be used in an 
emergency. 

Ointments and salves should not be 
used. Instead, a physician should be 
consulted immediately. 

Approximately 8,000 people in the 
United States die of burns each year. 
In addition, hundreds of thousands 
experience pain, disability, and 
disfigurement as a result of burns. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in March 

40 Years! 



Thomas Roan 

Forest Glen 



35 \fearsl 



Vernon Burgess, Rail Service 
Robert Green, 69th Street 
Mariano Imbraguglio, Power & Wiring 
Jimmie Moore, 52nd Street 
Nicholas Suero, Desplaines Terminal 
Michael Vasquez, North Terminals 
Fred Wilson, Utility 

30 \fearsi 

Walter Chapman, Rail System 
Frank Coleman, South Shops 
Timothy Hall, Near South 
Samuel Hart, Archer 
Thomas Jackson, 77th Street 
Charles Johnson, 52ncl Street 
Joseph Johnson, Beverly 
Willie Oakley, Rail System 
Will Taylor, 69th Street 
Willie Thomas, Archer 

25 \fearsl 

Fred Badke, Archer 
Thomas Devaney, West Section 
Charles Fronczak, Forest Glen 
Herbert Hodge, Archer 
Gerald Hogan, Bus Service 
Walter Keller, North Park 
Thomas Kirby, Shop Service 
Donald Mayer, Archer 
Billy McKnight, Bus Instruction 
Joseph Philip Sr., District A 
Evan Rhoda, District B 
Roscoe Spooner, South Section 
James Thaxton, Bus Instruction 



South Shore student 
earns academic honors 




NEW PENSIONERS 



CARL BRADLEY. Towerman, 

South Section. Emp. 5-21 51 
ROBERT BUSAM. Box Puller. 

Forest Glen, Emp, 5-23-46 
ZDZISLAW HURMAN. Bus Repairer. 

North Avenue. Emp, 1-11-67 
THURMON JOLLY. Janitor. 

69th Street. Emp, 8-28-58 
LEONARD KUKOWINSKI. Chief Clerk, 

Congress/Douglas, Emp, 2-28-47 
JIMMIE MOORE. Bus Operator, 

52nd Street. Emp, 3-23-48 
•ROGER MULVIHILL. Bus & Truck Mech,. 

South Shops. Emp, 7-23-47 
RONALD SHAW. Bus Operator, 

Beverly. Emp, 2-12-53 
EUGENE SIMPSON. Shopman I, 

Skokie Shop, Emp, 8-22-47 
VICTOR SZYMKEWICZ. Sr, Trav, Info, Rep, 

Pub Aff,/Con5, Servs.. Emp, 7-2-52 
EDWARD STRUGALLA. Bus Operator. 

Lawndale. Emp, 2-23-53 
EDWARD TONER Jr.. Prod, Planner, 

West Shops. Emp 9-29-75 
HOWARD WARD. Bus & Truck Mech.. 

South Shops. Emp, 4-1-47 



DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 

ROBERT ADAMS. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 6-10-68 
ANNA BOOTHROYD, Bilingual Trav, Rep,, 

Pub Aff,/Con5, Servs,. Emp, 7-31-65 
JUAN HERNANDEZ. Bus Operator, 

North Avenue. Emp, 5-22-69 
CLARENCE HURD. Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp, 4-18-72 
ANTHONY KRAUS. Serv, Truck Chauff,. 

West Shops. Emp, 12-22-48 
BILLY McCLAURIN. Bus Servicer. 

52nd Street. Emp. 8-1-69 



■Retroactive to 2-1-83 



Ilsr IwIEIs/EOR.I-A.1^ 



JOHN ALLEN. 78. Treasury, 

Emp 6-17-18. Died 1-1-83 
JOSEPH BASICH. 87, Way & Structs,. 

Emp, 7-16-21. Died 1-25-83 
FRANK CALPIN. 69, South Section, 

Emp, 9-4-45. Died 1-30-83 
JOSEPH FERRUZZA. 89, Way & Structs., 

Emp, 9 25-29. Died 1-21-83 
EARL FRAME. 90. West Section, 

Emp, 1-19-16. Died 11-30-82 
MARTIN GAZA. 81. South Shops, 

Emp, 5-12-41. Died 1-14-83 
JOHN GRANT. 77. Limits. 

Emp, 9-6-22. Died 1-5-83 
HARAIO GRIFFITHS. 91. Devon. 

Emp, 1-18-24, Died 1-5-83 
STANLEY GUSTAFSON. 69. North Park, 

Emp, 2-12-42. Died 1-31-83 
EDWARD HOWES. 84. West Section. 

Emp 7 8-18. Died 1-4-83 
IGNATIUS KUTA. 89. West Section, 

Emp. 8-21-58, Died 1-2-83 
WILLIAM LITTLE. 68. Veh, Maint,. 

Emp, 12-11-50, Died 1-30-83 
JOHN McLaughlin. 83. West Section. 

Emp, 7-16-56. Died 1-6-83 
MARY MOLINARI. 90. West Section. 

Emp, 7-3-39. Died 1-27-83 
EDWARD MULVANEY, 57. 69th Street, 

Emp, 5-11-61. Died 1-1-83 
ALBERT NEGELE. 79. North Park. 

Emp, 11-21-42. Died 1-14-83 
PHILLIP NEUGEBAUER. 83. North Avenue. 

Emp, 3-31 23. Died 1-3-83 
ROBERT OWENS. 57, Oper's Planning. 

Emp, 6-8-53. Died 1-2-83 
WILLIAM RUSSELL. 84. Desplaines. 

Emp. 9-23-20, Died 1-26-83 
ANNA SCHOLZ. 93, North Section, 

Emp, 1-21-47, Died 1-29-83 
FRANCESCO SCOZZARI. 88, Way & Structs, 

Emp, 5-23-23, Died 1-29-83 
JOHN SHONDER, 79, West Section, 

Emp, 1-4-26, Died 1-1-83 
ANTHONY SULLIVAN, 78, 69th Street, 

Emp, 4-2-29, Died 1-31-83 
JAMES WALSH, 71, Forest Glen, 

Emp, 1-11-52, Died 1-7-83 
JOHN WILLIAMS, Claims, 

Emp, 4-4-28. Died 1-17-83 
LAWRENCE WOLAVER, 82. Limits. 

Emp, 11-12-40. Died 1-24-83 
OPAL WOZNIAK. 64. West Section, 

Emp, 7-1-61, Died 1-19-83 
V, A, ZALATORIS, 72. Archer. 

Emp, 4-27-47. Died 1-22-83 



Daphne A, Ballard, 17, a senior at South 
Shore High School, has been named to Who's 
Who Among American High School Students, 
She is the daughter of bus operator Jack 
Ballard, and his wife, Mrs, Dorothy Ballard, a 
combination clerk at Harlem Shop, 

Miss Ballard who ranks 28 in a class of 204 
students, scored 23 on the American College 
Testing (ACT) and has been offered a full 
academic scholarship at Southern University in 
Baton Rouge, La,, Jackson State University. 
Jackson. Miss,, and Lane College in Tennessee, 

She is a participant in the Principal's Scholar- 
ship Program, a special honors college prepara- 
tory program for advance placement. The 



South Shore senior is a nationally commended 
student for national placement in the upper 10 
percent on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (PSAT). and has been nominated for induc- 
tion in the National Honor Society in May 

In 1982. Miss Ballard was selected by the 
Rotary Club of Chicago to attend the World 
Affairs Conference Seminar, an internation- 
al meeting of high school students which 
convened at the University of Wisconsin in 
Whitewater, 

Besides her academic exellence. Miss Ballard 
is a member of the South Shore High School 
girl's basket ball and Softball teams as well as the 
drama club. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 3 



WANTED 

for the June issue of TRANSIT NEWS: 

Pictures of high school or college 

students graduating in 1983 who are sons 
or daughters of CTA employees. 

All pictures must be taken by a profes- 
sional photographer and MUST be wallet 
size. On the back of the picture, please pro- 
vide the student's full name and school as 
well as the employee's name and work loca- 
tion. Pictures will not be returned. 

Please submit pictures to: CTA TRANS- 
IT NEWS, Merchandise Mart, Room 
734, Chicago, IL 60654. 
Deadline for Pictures -May 14, 1983 




SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box 



City, Slate, and Zip Code 



Mall to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merctiandlse Man, Chicago. IL 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Numbers 

Published lor employees and retirees ol CTA by the 
Public Alfairs/Consumer Services Division. Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Attairs Depart- 
ment. Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 
Contributing Whters: Ted Radakovic, 
Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department, 

DislriDuted free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees- Annual subscription price to 
others. $5 CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734. Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza. PO Box 3555. Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654 ' 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 

Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library- 
Evans ton, IL 60201 



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PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 




4P ir^u..A I f^^t^\'f^fZ3f(y4U>t 

1983 Volume 36-Nunnber 4 

Transit News 



Row of CTA buses in Blitz's remanufacturing shop on the West Side. Old, damaged bulkheads and rear assemblies are being removed follow- 
ing dismounting of engines and transmissions. . „_ •, . ' • 



Blitzed buses live longer i 

M 



lore than 700 of CTA's General 
Motors "New Look" buses, once 
doomed to the junkyard because of 
premature aging of their rear bulk- 
heads and engine supports, are being 
given another five years of service life 
during their visit to a bus "health spa." 

The premature aging of the 1,500- 
pound thick steel plate bulkheads, 
struts, brackets, and engine assembly 
supports was caused by the potholed 
streets, the additional load of air-con- 
ditioning equipment, standing passen- 
ger loads, and the basic design of the 
bus structure . 

These 745 buses, built by G.M. 
(CMC type 5307A) in 1974-75-76, 
should have had a life expectancy of 
about 15 years. The premature aging 
symptoms were caused by three suc- 
cessive savage winters (1977-78-79) 



with mounting snowfalls, plunging sub- 
zero temperatures, and heavy use by 
CTA's regular bus riders who were 
joined by what CTA calls its "snow 
birds," motorists who flock to the 
buses in cold weather. 

During these three disastrous win- 
ters, hundreds of CTA buses devel- 
oped distortions in their rear bulk- 
heads and supports, and rivet holes 
became enlarged due to shock and vi- 
bration. Rusting and corrosion added 
to the vehicles' ills. 

George Millonas, manager of CTA's 
Equipment Engineering and Mainte- 
nance department, summed up the 
buses' problems this way: 

"Without remedial action, cracks 
that first appeared in the rear under- 
carriage started spreading. We made 
attempts to patch the cracks, but it 
soon became apparent that patching 



would not work. 

"Specifications were prepared by 
our department's staff, and bids were 
solicited for rebuilding these buses' 
rear bulkheads and supports. The suc- 
cessful bidder was the Blitz Corpora- 
tion of 4525 W. 26th St." 

If any bus maintenance operation 
could be termed a bus "health spa," 
then the one million square foot facility 
operated by Blitz is it. 

Blitz is headed by Carmont Blitz and 
his brother, Bill. The firm has been 
serving the bus and trucking industry 
for some 50 years. Its reputation for 
excellence in the transit industry is 
such that buses needing extensive 
maintenance have been brought to 
Blitz from New Orleans, Houston, 
Detroit, Washington, D.C., Philadel- 
phia, and even trucked in from Fair- 
banks, Alaska. , . ■ oi 
(continued on page Z] 



Blitzed buses I 

(continued from page 1) 

Blitz was the only bidder for the 
CTA specified work— partial-remanu- 
facturing of the rear bulkhead assem- 
blies that measure 10 feet long by 2y2 
feet high and 8 feet wide. Blitz removed 
the buses' rear sidewalls, engines, air 
conditioners, fittings, and the damaged 
rear bulkheads, and implanted the 
new, stronger bulkheads, and reas- 
sembled the components. 

The first contract of $7 million for 
partial-remanufacturing of 495 CTA 
buses is expected to extend their use- 
fulness up to another five years. The 
cost of the work on these buses is 
slightly more than 10 per cent of their 
replacement cost in today's new bus 
market. At about $126,00.0 each, the 
purchase of 495 new buses would 
have come to about $62.4 million. 

Here is the vital factor in the CTA's 
decision to save the doomed buses; 
These "New Look" buses were less 
than 12 years old and did not qualify 
for federal funding for their replace- 
ment. The financially-strapped CTA 
could not afford the $62.4 million, but 
the agency could afford raising the $7 
million to assure its riders continued 
dependable service. 

Blitz recently was the successful bid- 
der for $5 million CTA contract for 
partial-remanufacturing of another 250 
"New Look" buses. This second con- 
tract went into effect January 5, 1983. 

An interesting side note is that the 
Blitz Corporation has acquired the 
metal stamping dies for the "New 
Look" buses from General Motors, so 
that Blitz is able to create exact re-- 
placements in their plant. 

Millonas said that, in addition to the 
work done by Blitz, CTA has awarded 
contracts for rebuilding or replacement 
of bus engines and for rebuilding trans- 
missions damaged by wear caused by 
the defective bulkheads, 

G.M.'s "New Look" buses make up 
70 per cent of CTA's fleet of 2,275 
buses, but not all of CTA's "New 
Look" buses suffered rear assembly 
and bulkhead damage 

With the treatment received at Blitz's 
bus "health spa," these CTA "New 
Look" buses will continue to serve rid- 
ers and look good for years to come. 




Old rear structural assembly shows its premature agirjg because of three severe 
winters, overloading of riders, potholes in streets, and salt corrosion. 

Remanufactured rear structure assembly, completed by Blitz, is ready for remounting 
of bus's engine and transmission. New, high-strength metals and advance fabricating 
machines at Blitz provide stronger unit than original one. 

Multiple-headed acetylene cutting torch machine used to mass-produce heavy 
brackets from one-fourthinch thick steel plate for bus rear structural assembly. 

Computer-guided numerical control cutting machine follows computer programmed 
pattern for punching holes in one-eight-inch thick steel plate to form bus bulkhead. 

Blitz mechanic completes reinstallation of rear wheel-axle assembly following 
installation of new rear bulkhead structure. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




From the Chairman 



Innovation 

Efficient financial management can 
only be achieved through hard choices 
and creative innovation. This issue of 
Transit News reports recent innovations 
which are helping CTA save money in 
these difficult economic times. 

The transit operating environment in 
Chicago has proven to be a great strain 
on our bus fleet, and a significant number 
of buses have developed major mechani- 
cal problems which could not be correct- 
ed by normal preventive maintenance. 
Yet CTA could not afford to purchase 
new buses from operating funds, and the 
buses were not old enough to qualify 
for replacement through federal capital 
funding. 

CTA solved this dilemma by letting 
contracts to a private corporation, which 
is rebuilding damaged components of the 
buses at a fraction of the cost of vehicle 
replacement. This will extend the operat- 
ing life of the buses by approximately five 
years, at which time they will be replaced 
through capital programs. This form of 
rehabilitation also reflects the need for 
better care and maintenance of our equip- 
ment in-house, which will, in turn, insure 
us against the loss of jobs by attrition 
throughout the Authority. I suggest we all 
try harder to protect that which is ours. 

Recent innovations in the rail shops at 
Skokie have provided more efficient 
ways to diagnose mechanical problems in 
major rail car components. Major prob- 
lems can now be diagnosed in four hours 
or less, rather than the two to three days 
previously required, and rail cars can be 
more quickly repaired and returned to 
service. 

These are just two examples of the 
types of creative innovation and hardline 
decision-making that must be exerted by 
all of us if we expect to meet today's fiscal 
challenges. My fellow Board members 
and I greatly appreciate all of your efforts 
to cut costs and use our operating funds 
more efficiently. 

Most importantly, creative manage- 
ment and efficiency demonstrate to our 
legislators that we are providing the best 
possible service for our riders at the low- 
est possible cost. This should encourage 
them to enact and support legislation 
which will provide increased funding so 
badly needed by transit systems. 



b^2..>^^<i 



jCJc^,- 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 4 




Robert Desvignes / 




Transportation department 
realigns organization 



Transportation Manager Harry 
Reddrick said some recent personnel 
changes and the establishment of five 
sections within the department which 
he has implemented were necessary 
to improve organizational alignment. 

Reddrick said Michael LaVelle re- 
mains in his key position as director 
of Service, while veteran Superin- 
tendent of Rail Instruction and Train- 
ing Robert Janz has been named to 
the post of area superintendent/rail 
service. Reddrick's appointment of 
Janz fills the vacancy created last 
year with the retirement of Herbert 
Lowenstein. 

Another key personnel change in 
the Service Section is the appoint- 
ment of former Assistant Superin- 
tendent, Service, Bruce Anderson to 



superintendent of the new West Rail 
District. The new district augments 
service on the West-Northwest route 
which includes the O'Hare Extension. 

Reddrick said also that Area Super- 
intendent Lester Racker will remain 
in his post as head of Communica- 
tions and Power Control, reporting 
to the Transportation manager. 

New appointments in the Trans- 
portation Personnel Section are Alex 
Johnson, director; David Martin, 
area superintendent. Central; Thomas 
Reilly, superintendent. Far South; 
Clark Carter, superintendent, 69th 
Street garage, and Edward Schwamb, 
superintendent. Limits garage. 

Assignments were also shifted in 
the Training and Instruction Section 
with Elonzo (Lonnie) Hill being 



named director, while Norman 
Herron was elevated to the post left 
vacant by Hill as superintendent of 
the Training Center. Other Training 
and Instruction Section appointments 
went to Paul Kadowaki, area superin- 
tendent, rail/bus instruction; William 
Thompson, superintendent, bus in- 
struction, and Arthur Hubbard, super- 
intendent, rail instruction and 
training. 

Reddrick said additional functions 
assumed by Training and Instruction 
will be supervised by Ronald Baker, 
superintendent, training programs. 
Appointed to head the new Adminis- 
tration and Performance Control 
Section is Director Robert Desvignes, 
while Edward Mitchell is named spe- 
cial assistant to the Transportation 
manager. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




7983 Vol. 36-No. 4 



Commendation Corner 



James Smith (North Ave- 
nue garage) was praised by 
Theresa Schiavone, of West 
Superior Street, for his alert- 
ness as operator of a No. 66 
Chicago bus. "I was coming 
home from worl< after a long, 
tiring day. I got on the bus 
with a broken ankle, con- 
cerned more about my foot 
than my purse. I did not 
notice a pickpocket trying to 
get into my purse. But the 
bus driver spotted him and 
ordered him off the bus. He 
refused to get off and called 
the driver a horrible name, but 
the driver insisted on his get- 
ting off, and he did. Through 
the great concern of the 
driver, I was spared the loss 
of my wallet." 




Blanca Torres (Forest Glen 
garage) was commended by 
Carol Gaedging, of Kimball 
Avenue, for the way she han- 
dles her job as operator of a 
No. 78 Montrose bus. "I want 
you to know that this lovely 
lady is always very courteous 
to everyone. I have ridden 
with her many times, and she 
is also a very good driver. I 
also admire her for the way 
she handles situations like 
when passengers don't want 
to pay the fare, or when they 
are making noise or bothering 
other passengers. She's got 
lots of sense and understand- 
ing in dealing with all kinds of 
people. " 



Billy Ragsdale (52nd Street garage) was the operator of 
a No. 1 Indiana/Hyde Park bus that Charles Langdon, of 
Van Wert, Ohio, rode with a group one Sunday from the 
Museum of Science and Industry to Union Station. "We had 
a great time enjoying all the sights. As a curious visitor, i 
struck up a conversation with the driver. He was very kind 
and courteous to all passengers, was concerned with the 
older folks, and just a real treat to have as a driver. I would 
just like to say that Chicago really does have some nice peo- 
ple. Not only does he make Chicago more enjoyable to visit, 
but he makes riding your bus a real pleasure." 



Eugene Church (North Avenue garage) was compli- 
mented by Mrs. Fred Leverenz, of North Kedvale Avenue, 
for his handling of a No. 73 Armitage bus. "1 ride CTA buses 
*o different destinations every week. 1 find most drivers to be 
courteous and considerate. There is one driver 1 wish to 
compliment. 1 transferred to his bus and sat at the front. His 
manner and driving skill, and the ease with which he ap- 
proached the curb to let off and pick up passengers made it 
an especially enjoyable ride. 1 also was impressed by the 
'respect' he seemed to have for his bus. It was as though he 
was driving his very own vehicle." 



John Herron (North Avenue garage) was the operator of 
a No. 86 North/Narragansett bus that Mrs. Hugh Feely, of 
North Normandy Avenue, rode with her husband. "The bus 
was packed with students, and we had to stand right by the 
driver. We were not long on the bus when he alerted me 
quietly to watch my pocketbook. Then he announced to the 
passengers (there were quite a few elderly people on the 
bus) to watch out for pickpockets. He took some abuse from 
a couple of the students, but he remained very cool. He is a 
gentlemen, a credit to the CTA, and had his passengers' in- 
terest before his own." 



Jacqueline Cousin (Archer garage) was called "a won- 
derful driver" by Jean Hussey, of South Wood Street, who 
was a rider on her 51st Street bus. "1 noticed the bus driver 
was very courteous to all the passengers. She would call the 
streets, and as the passengers got up to get off, she would 
say, 'Hold on. Be careful, and watch your step.' I would say 
she was concerned about the safety of the passengers on her 
bus. Having a driver like this makes one's trip more en- 
joyable. What we need is more bus drivers like her. I know 
CTA would like to hear about her." 



Robert Kremer (North Park garage) is regarded as a "fine 
person" by Mrs. H. O'Day, of Bryn Mawr Avenue, for the 
courteous manner in which he operates his No. 11 Lincoln 
bus. "I have been on his bus more than once, and 1 find him 
to be very nice, pleasant and courteous. He calls out all the 
streets and stops, and he even thanked the other driver he 
relieved. He is neat and clean, even to his shined shoes. It is 
really wonderful to see all this. I had to write in and compli- 
ment you people on having this fine driver." 



Ramona Bolden (77th Street garage) was the "very nice 
lady" that Mellowneice Springfield, of West 75th Place, 
"had the pleasure of riding with" on a 79th Street bus. 
"There was a lady on the bus who wanted to know about 
the time on her transfer. She went out of her way to patient- 
ly answer her questions efficiently and courteously. She 
takes pride in her job, and that's the kind of people there are 
too few of in this world. I also would like to thank her very 
much for being extremely nice and waiting for me and my 
two children. In my opinion, she is outstanding." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CERA's 45th anniversary offers an exciting weekend 



Central Electric Railfans' Associa- 
tion (CERA) is 45 years old and plans 
are set to kick up its wheels in a jubi- 
lant birthday test. 

CERA invites you to join in the cele- 
bration of its 45th anniversary the 
weekend of May 27-30. Its festive 
agenda offers participants a chance to 
relive, via the silver screen, a period of 
two decades ago when commuters 
traveled on the North Shore Line be- 
tween Milwaukee and Chicago. 

The program will be presented Fri- 
day, May 27 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Walnut Room of the Bismarck Hotel 
by CTA's Walter Keevil of Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance. Admis- 
sion is free. 

The CERA celebration slips in and 
out of the past and finally into the 
future giving railfans a grand synopsis 
of Chicagoland transportation history. 

A Saturday tour will leave the Ran- 
dolph Street station at 9:58 a.m. for a 
fantrip on the South Shore Line— 
CERA's first ride on the South Shore's 
new cars. The trip between Chicago 
and the shops at Michigan City, Ind. 



will give riders a sample of the daily 
pattern of interurban travel 1983 style. 

There will be opportunity for photos 
at New Carlisle and at South Bend. 
Return to downtown Chicago will be 
about 4 p.m. in time for the banquet at 
the Bismarck. 

A home style country fried chicken 
lunch awaits those on this journey at 
Home Cafe in New Carlisle. The cost, 
including lunch, is $25 per person. 

The evening's activities begin at 
5:30 p.m. in the Pavilion Room of the 
Bismarck. Accompanying the banquet 
will be a program of movies featuring 
electric railways on the streets of Chi- 
cago. You'll enjoy this treat presented 
by Walter Keevil. Cost for this trip 
down memory lane and the feast is 
$25 per person. 

Sunday's program brings the past 
into the present beginning at 9 a.m. 
as railfans leave from the Randolph 
Street side of the Bismarck via over- 
the-road motor coaches to the Fox 
River Line. Here you'll enjoy the 
three-car train from "The Great Third 
Rail," the Chicago Aurora and Elgin 



Railway, which includes America's 
oldest existing interurban car. Box 
lunches will be served. 

The trip continues to the Illinois 
Railway Museum at Union, Illinois, 
where you will see cars of the Illinois 
Terminal, Indiana Railroad, the Mil- 
waukee Electric, the Red Arrow, and 
dozens of others. Chartered motor 
coaches will return to downtown 
Chicago beginning at 5 p.m. Cost for 
the day's activities is $25, which in- 
cludes lunch. 

Monday, May 30, Memorial Day, 
begins for the CERA anniversary at 
7:55 a.m. with a ride into the future as 
you join others in wrapping up this 
festive weekend with a ride along the 
rapid transit O'Hare extension. 

The trip covers most of the CTA 
rapid transit system. For those who 
have not had an opportunity to visit 
the Jackson Park branch reopened to 
University station in December, this 
will be the occasion to do so. Gener- 
ous photo stops have been arranged. 
The cost for the day's activity is $20. 



Thanks— for a 
job well done 

Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 

Even Barber, North Avenue 
Dwayne Borom, Limits 
Charlotte Brent, West Section 

Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Edith Carr, Forest Glen 
Ethel Carter, 77th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 

Nathaniel Dickson, Limits 
Linda Downing, Limits 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Odell Duffin, 77th Street 

James Estes, Forest Glen 

Edward Farmer, 77th Street 
Emiliano Feliciano, Limits 
James Franklin, Archer 
Curt Fuzzell, Limits 

Larry Goffer, Limits 

James Green, Jefferson Park 



Otis Hampton, Limits 
Mary Harper, North Section 
Peyton Hightower, 77th Street 
John Hopkins, 77th Street 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 
Stella Hunt, Forest Park 

Ferry Jackson Jr., 69th Street 
Zeke Jagst, North Park 

Martin Kane, Howard/Kimball 
Evelyn Knightshead, 69th Street 
James Kolstad, Beverly 

Lee Lampley, 77th Street 
John Lemond, North Park 
Raul Lopez, North Park 

Collis Majddox, Archer 

Jack Martin, Archer 

William McCoy, North Avenue 

Sherman McKinney, 52nd Street 

Lura Minter, North Avenue 

Lem Newell, Limits 

Amos Pearson, Limits 
Robert Pritchard, Forest Glen 

Juan Quinones, North Avenue 



Billy Ragsdale, 52nd Street 
John Reynolds, 52nd Street 
Garland Rhines, North Park 
Annie Rice, Limits 
Rafael Rivera, North Park 
Jose Rodriguez, North Avenue 
David Rosenthal, North Park 

Pablo Silva, Limits 
Jackie Smith, Archer 
Ronald Stefinsky, Archer 
Derrick Stephens, 77th Street 
Charles Swain, North Park 

Thomas Teuscher, Howard/Kimball 
Sam Thomas, Washington Garage 

Gladys Vera, North Avenue 
Robert Vining Jr., Archer 

Georgia Washington, 69th Street 
Willie Whisenton, Limits 
Wendy Whiteley, Archer 
Jerry Williams, Douglas/Congress 
Mary Williams, 69th Street 
Wayne Williams, District A 
Billy Willis, North Avenue 
William Wolf, Forest Glen 

Jacques Yezeguielian, North Avenue 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



7983 Vol. 36- No. 4 



More innovations 
developed at Skokie 





CTA's Skokie Shop is the place where many maintenance 
innovations for rapid transit cars have been created and later 
adapted throughout the public transit industry. 

Two more maintenance firsts have just been announced 
by George Haenisch, superintendent, Rail Vehicle Shops, 
and they too were created by personnel assigned to Skokie 
Shop. 

Haenisch explained the first of the two cost-saving inno- 
vations this way: 

"In late 1980, motor alternators on the Boeing (2400 
series) rapid transit cars began developing bearing problems. 
The 15 motor alternator units we had for spare parts were in 
use and those on hand were the defective units they 
replaced. 

"Skokie Shop had the capabilities to repair these defective 
units, but no method of testing them to be sure everything 
on these complex devices was in working order." 

A diagnostic testing station was devised to hook up re- 
paired motor alternators to a display panel so that all the 
MAs' circuits and mechanical parts could be tested and cali- 
brated at one time. 

Before the creation of the MA diagnostic testing station, 
the repaired units were tested through the use of a two-car 
Boeing train and track space at the Skokie Shop. i 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS- 




George Haenisch (left), superintendent, Rail Vehicle Maintenance, and 
Frank Vukovics, acting unit supervisor, examine gauges of air condi- 
tioning testing station in Skokie Stiop. 

Kerry Howe, Skokie Stiop electrician, flips a toggle switcti on air con- 
ditioning unit testing station tie fielped invent to ctteck results of 
repair work before units are reinstalled in 'L' cars. By 1986, two-tf)irds 
of CTA's 1,100 'L' cars are expected to have air conditioning with non- 
opening panoramic windows. 

Louis Valle (right) and Angelo DeAngelis, Skokie Shop electrical 
workers, use their motor alternator test station to check out repaired 
motor alternator to assure it is in operating order before the 4,000- 
pound 'L' car power unit is reinstalled. Valle and DeAngelis created 
the testing station to help shorten out-of-service time for 'L' cars with 
motor alternator problems. 

Valle (right) and DeAngelis check the circuitry on the testing station 
they built in Skokie Shop. The testing station, first of its kind in the 
rapid transit industry, helps cut out-of-service time for late model 'U 
cars from days to hours. 



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In order to test, these trains had to be raised and lowered 
jveral times to properly calibrate and test the repaired 
[As, which took two to three days. This was a very ineffi- 
ent and impractical method of checking repaired MA units. 

This inefficient testing method was being used on the 
oeing cars, of which CTA has 200, and also on the Biidd 
?600 series) cars. CTA is in the process of receiving an 
rder of 600 Budd cars. 

The MA diagnostic testing station was an idea whose time 
ideed had come. 

Lou Valle and Angelo DeAngelis, Skokie Shop electri- 
ians, volunteered to tackle the project. Within six weeks, 
'alle and DeAngelis had designed electric circuits, laid out 
le components, and fabricated the motor alternator 
iagnostic testing station . 

The out-of-serivce time for cars with defective MAs was 
ramatically reduced from up to three days down to about 
Dur to six hours, thanks to the diagnostic testing station, 
ikokie Shop now has 15 MAs in readiness. 

Joining Valle and DeAngelis in creating the station was 
ohn Soprych, supervisor, Rail Technical Services, who 
esigned a facility for the station to electrically load the MAs. 

A second innovation deals with the bane of riders in rapi<;l 
ransit cars with fixed panoramic windows that don't 



open — defective air conditioning units. 

During the summer of 1981, the Boeing cars were ex- 
periencing an excessive number of air conditioning unit 
failures because of their expansion valves. Such two-car 
trains must be immediately removed from service and 
brought to Skokie Shop to have their AC units replaced. 

To repair and test AC units, a two-car train and Skokie 
Shop track had to be utilized. This sometimes took up to four 
days. These 4,000-lb. AC units can be bench-tested, thus, 
Muzio Ficarella, Skokie Shop journeyman electrician, was 
assigned to create a testing station patterned for the MAs. 

Ficarella accumulated various parts and built an AC test- 
ing station. Joining Ficarella in refining the station's capabili' 
ties was Kerry Howe, a journeyman electrical worker. 
Howe accumulated additional testing components so that 
two repaired AC units could be tested at the same time, and 
the AC units can be returned to a train in about four hours 
instead of the three or four days formerly needed to repair 
and test just one AC unit. 

Like the MA diagnostic testing station, the AC testing sta- 
tion is capable of testing Budd as well as Boeing cars. 

Savings to the CTA with the use of these two testing sta- 
tions is expected to greatly reduce the out-of-service time for 
trains, and free Skokie Shop personnel for other vital work. 



983 Vol. 36- No. 4 



Hispanic-American 

women honor 

Elda Leal for service 




Elda Leal, Public Affairs media co- 
ordinator, was one of four honorees at 
the fifth annual Women of Achieve- 
ment Awards dinner April 15 spon- 
sored by the Mexican-American Busi- 
ness and Professional Women's Club 
of Chicago. 

Founded and chartered in March 
1977, the Mexican-American Business 
and Professional Women's Club hon- 
ors Hispanic-American women whose 
noteworthy achievements in profes- 
sional and socio-political involvement 
have had a great community impact. 

Mrs. Leal is vice president of the 
Board of Directors, El Hogar del Nino, 
and past president of the Mexican 
Civic Society. She has also served as a 
board member of the Little Village 
Community Council, Trust Inc., and 
Girl Scouts of Chicago, as well as 
chairperson of numerous special 
events for the Hispanic Federation of 
Chambers of Commerce, Boys Club, 
and other community organizations. 

Mrs. Leal is a native of Monterrey, 
Nuevo Leon, Mexico, and a graduate 
of the English Commercial Institute in 
Monterrey. Prior to moving to Chi- 
cago in 1962, she worked as a bilin- 
gual secretary for a bank and export- 
ing company. 

She had already gained notoriety 
for her active participation in com- 
munity service when she joined CTA 
Public Affairs in 1973 as a secretary. 
As president of the Mexican Civic 
Society in 1977, she assisted in the 
production of an Emmy Award win- 
ning documentary "Mexico Vibra en 



Chicago," as a researcher and script 
writer. The documentary which was 
produced by Luron Production, won a 
TV Emmy in 1978. 

As chairperson of the fund raising 
committee for El Hogar del Nino, Mrs. 
Leal was instrumental in raising 
$56,000 toward the purchase of a 
building at 2325 South California 
which is now being used to expand a 
day care and after school program for 
children 3 to 14 years old. Currently, 
all of her community involvement is 
devoted to raising additional funds for 
remodeling the facility. 

Other honors received by Mrs. Leal 
include recognition from the Hispanic 
American Jaycees for her active com- 
munity involvement in the Youth 
Motivation Program, sponsored by the 
Chicago Association of Commerce 
and Industry, and special recognition 
from the Pilsen Neighbors Community 
Council for her assistance in public 
relations and publicity in La Fiesta del 
Sol and El Hogar del Nino fund raising 
efforts. 



Earns promotion 



Director of pensions 
co-authors book 




Michael Vitale has been named super- 
intendent. Examination and Claims 
Investigation. In his new responsibili- 
ties he works with CTA staff and per 
diem attorneys preparing claims for 
trial. Prior to his promotion, an- 
nounced by Claims Manager Leon 
Wool, Vitale was Claims Examiner su- 
pervisor. He joined the Chicago Sur- 
face Lines in June 1943 as a messen- 
ger in the Claims Department. 




Raymond Fleming, director of pensions and 
Retirement Allowance Committee secretary, 
looks approvingly at a copy of tfie book on 
Street Car RPO Service in Chicago wtiich he 
co-authored with John R. Mason of Dallas, 
an engineering consultant. The book is in 
CTA's library at the /Merchandise Mart. 

Everything you may have wanted to 
know about street car mail service in 
Chicago is now available in a handy 
73-page book co-authored by CTA 
employee Raymond Fleming, director 
of pensions, and Retirement Allow- 
ance Committee secretary. 

Fleming and co-author John R. 
Mason of Dallas, an engineering con- 
sultant and native Chicagoan, spent 
three years researching and writing 
the soft cover book, "Street Car RPO 
service in Chicago." Both are mem- 
bers of the Mobile Postal Society, a na- 
tional organization established to pro- 
vide the public with information about 
street car mail service. Mason is presi- 
dent of MPS. 

Fleming and Mason's book is a 
history of a long-since non-existent 
service in Chicago. The book is in 
CTA's Harold S. Anthon Memorial 
Library in the Merchandise Mart, and 
may also be purchased for $6 per copy 
through Fleming, or the Mobile Post 
Office Society in Chicago. All pro- 
ceeds will go to the society. 

Fleming said kudos for assistance 
with research and other details which 
helped to make the book possible go 
to Joseph Benson, director of Infor- 
mation Services, Judy Genesen, 
supervisor, Forms/Records/Proce- 
dures; Chris Borcic, Public Affairs/ 
Consumer Services; Glenn Anderson, 
Equipment Engineering and Mainte- 
nance, and George Krambles, CTA 
executive director, retired. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





Limits players and coaches savour the sneet taste of victory while the Outlaws look to 
next season. 



No limit to league excitement 






Enthusiastic basketball fans— 2,500 
of them, were treated to an aggressive 
and well played championship game 
for the CTA Basketball League title at 
Washington Park ficldhouse on April 5. 

Transportation's Arthur Hubbard and 
his Outlaws, representing the General 
office, made good showing but the 
Limits team, led by Coach Alexander 
Miller, jumped to an early lead which 
they never gave up. 

Mike Ewing of the Outlaws led all 
scoring with 28 points while Rick 
James of Limits was a close second 
with 27 points. Along with aggressive 
play on the boards and fine shooting. 



the Limits squad also included Wade 
Jones, the most valuable player of the 
tournament. 

The 10 teams comprising the CTA 
Basketball League have been compet- 
ing since November. Although Limits 
walked away with the championship 
trophy, there were no losers; the fine 
play and sense of teamwork is some- 
thing in which the league can take 
pride. We look forward to next season! 




Greg Croom and Morris Bonds battle for the opening tip to start the championship game 
of this years league finale. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 4 







ZAP 



A»W«A»R»D»S 



Personnel at 61st Street/Racine 
Maintenance Terminal earned a fourth 
quarter 1982 first place Zero Accident 
Program (ZAP) award to close out the 
year with their eighth consecutive first 
place ZAP certificate since 1981. 

Taking first place in the competition 
for three consecutive quarters was Des- 
plaines Terminal. Harlem Terminal 
took a second consecutive first place 
in the fourth quarter while Wilson 
Maintenance Terminal employees saw 
their only first place ZAP award in this 
quarter. 

Other first place winners in the 
fourth quarter were Lawndalc Garage, 
and Rail Shops at Skokie. While work- 
ers at 61st Street/Racine were being 
the usual winners, night shift workers 
at that location as well as Desplaines, 
Harlem and Lawndale, in unusual 
fashion, joined in the limelight by ac- 
cepting award certificates during their 
shifts. 




Forest Glen Garage won its first safety award for 1982 as it completed ttie fourtti quarter witti 
no employee injuries. Sal Furlin (rigtit) holds ttie coveted award as ottier garage personnel 
stiare ttie limelight. 




Employees at Wilson Terminal assembled for this "family portrait" as they celebrated their 
first quarterly ZAP competition first place certificate for 1982. Don Falborski, assistant 
foreman, displays the certificate. 



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Desplaines Maintenance Terminal night workers proudly display the 
safety award which they earned for completion of their third con- 
secutive quarter without injuries. They are (from left) car servicers 
James O'Toole. Fred Sosnowski, Al Bonick, J. Nickel, and Unit Super- 
visor Ed Schumacher Holding the award is Night Foreman Gary 
Kemp. Others are car repairers Stu Lamch, Bill Lochon, and Ray 
Ramirez (kneeling). 



A second consecutive first place safety award was earned by person- 
nel at Harlem Terminal in the fourth quarter ZAP competition. Night 
workers showing off the certificate are (from left, front row) Ada 
Jimenez, car servicer: Ivlike O'Sullivan, night foreman (holding award), 
Fred Chiles, car repairer, and fi^aude Lambert, car servicerJBack row) 
Joe Gragido, and Joe Szoldatitas, car repairers; Bill Kincaid, car serv- 
icer, and Fred Shawson, car repairer 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




First place winners at North Park Garage show off their ZAP cer- 
tificate. Holding the award is Day Foreman Philip O'Connor, flanked 
by James Dudley (left), Equipment Engineering/Maintenance Safety 
supervisor, and Tom Gecan, superintendent of North side garages. 




Lawndale Garage also took first place honors in ZAP competition for 
having no injuries during the fourth quarter of 1982. I^embers of this 
group of enthusiastic night personnel beam proudly as co-worker 
Leonard Jordan displays the coveted first place certificate of 
recognition. 




Night shift employees at 61st Street/Racine Terminal display the 
safety award for the fourth quarter, 1982. Personnel at 61st Street/ 
Racine have received first place awards for every quarter since 1981. 
The happy crew includes (from left) Gary Johnson and Sullivan 
Richardson, car repairers; Roy f^itchell, acting night foreman; Jim 
Alleyne (holding certificate), and Irving Patterson, car repairers. 




Skokie Shop welders proudly display their third consecutive award 
for zero injuries in their area in the fourth quarter They are (from left, 
kneeling) Ken Blocker, foreman; Rodrigo Silva, l^ike Fabian, fvlark 
Bianchini, and Ray Santana, welders. Standing (from left) are George 
Wylie, unit supervisor; Jung Kim, Jerry Hornung, Mike Healy, Elmer 
Fischer, Cesar Flores, and Art Martinez, welders. Other winning 
areas at Skokie Shops participating were the Paint Shop, Armature 
Room, Vehicle Wiring, and the Degreasing area. Each completed the 
fourth quarter of 1982 without injuries. 




Seven areas in Bus Shops were winners in the fourth quarter Zero 
Accident Program (ZAP). Accepting first place certificates for their 
areas which completed the quarter without an injury were (from left) 
John Krugan, acting unit supervisor. Body Shop; Maurice O'Connor, 
a blacksmith/welder representing the Blacksmith Shop area; 
Terrence McGuigan, Bus Shops superintendent; Thecia (Tillie) 
Duszynski, Printing Shop leader; Nicholas Simonetti, unit supervisor, 
Unit Rebuild; Winmon Lewis, Paint Shop foreman; LeRoy Hagen, 
foreman, Electrical/Body; James Forrestal, unit supervisor. Mechani- 
cal; Raymond Klaub, foreman, Sheet Metal Shop; Jerome Pavel, fore- 
man of Hoist; James Dudley, supervisor, Safety-Equipment Engineer- 
ing/Maintenance, making the presentations. Robert Mandujano, 
Upholstery Shop leader, accepts first place award for his area. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 4 



13 



Art Tonner steps out of the picture 




Tanner receives congratulations and his retirement packet from Roger Wood, manager, 
Management Services. 




Sharing in the joyous occasion of Art Tanner's retirement are (from left) his sister, Ruth Wager, 
his wife, Mary, and his daughter and son-in-law, Mary Ann and Ed Calmeyn. 



After 36 years in public transit in 
Chicago, and 29 years in CTA's Pho- 
tographic Section, Art Tonner cele- 
brated his retirement at a luncheon in 
the Merchants and Manufacturers 
Club, March 25, and an open house in 
the CTA Board room, March 30. 

Hundreds of friends and well-wish- 
ers gathered to thank Tonner for his 
friendship and dedicated artistry as a 
photographer and supervisor of the 
Photographic Section. At the lunch- 
eon, speakers including Executive Di- 
rector Bernard Ford, Director of Ad- 
ministrative Services Chuck Zanin, 



'77/ really miss all 
my friends ..." 



and retirees Thor Haaning, John 
Gritis, and Harold Brown recalled the 
pleasure of working with Tonner dur- 
ing the early development of the 
Photographic Section and the years of 
progress under Tonner's guidance that 
have produced a multi-talented, serv- 
ice-oriented section. Most often noted 
was Tonner's selfless dedication and 
cooperative spirit, whether the job re- 
quired emergency photo coverage at 
any hour of the day or night, or long 
hours of innovation and experimen- 
tation that increased the capabilities of 
the Photographic Section while oper- 
ating on a limited budget. 

Tonner received many retirement 
gifts, including a new strobe light for 
his camera, a gold watch, a generous 
cash gift, and a plaque made by Tom 
Boyle, manager. Safety, which con- 
tains memorabilia dating back to 
Tonner's early years as a streetcar con- 
ductor. The Photographic Section staff 
also displayed blow-ups of the few 
photos that CTA's "Mr. Photography" 
appeared in throughout the years, in- 
cluding his first I.D. photo. 

"I'll really miss all my friends here, 
and I enjoyed working with every- 
body," says Tonner. But he will be a 
hard man to find after April 1, unless 
you check the local golf courses or 
look for him in his- garden, for Art 
plans to have a very happy and active 
retirement. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in April 

Robert Valerious, South Shops 

35 Years 

Michael Fitzgerald, Fac. Engr. & Maint. 
Arthur Jackson, 77th Street 

30 Years! 

Nelson Anderson, Ashland Terminal 
Joseph Chapman, Rail System 
Nick Fieramosca, Harlem Terminal 
Tommie Fortune, Fac. Engr. & Maint. 
Freddie Gregory, Ashland Terminal 
Leon Minor, 77th Street 
Ike Rivers, Administrative Services 
James Thrower, Bus Service 



25 Yearsl 



Homer Barron Jr., Stores 

Louis Dixon, Bus Service 

Esco Ducksworth, Archer 

Nathaniel Glover, Fac. Engr. & Maint. 

Edwin Olender, North Park 

Robert Ross, 77th Street 

Cyril Schindler, Beverly 

Louis Stewart, Fac. Engr. & Maint. 

NEW PENSIONERS 

QUINTUS BONDS, Car Repairer, 

98th Street, Emp. 12-28-48 
GEORGE BURNS, Conductor, 

95th Street, Emp. 3-28-52 
WALTER CHAPMAN, Janitor Foreman, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 3-31-53 
MICHAEL KILCOMMONS, Trackman II, 

West Shops, Emp. 12-14-70 
RAYMOND LASKOWSKI, Mach. Shop. 

Frmn., 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 6-10-47 
JOHN MILLER, Chief Clerk, 

Washington Garage, Emp. 7-28-48 
GEORGE NOONAN, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 5-28-46 
WILLIE OAKLEY, Rail Janitor, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 3-19-53 
ROBERT REDING, Carpenter A, 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 10-7-48 
HOWARD SURRETT, Serv. Trk. Chauff., 

West Shops, Emp. 8-20-47 
ARTHUR TONNER, Supvr., Photo., 

Adm. Services, Emp. 8-7-46 
ROY WILLIAMS, Sr. Travel Rep., 

Pub. Aff./Cons. Srvcs.. Emp. 2-25-48 
HERMAN WOODS, Serv. Trk. Chauff., 

West Shops, Emp. 3-10-50 

DISABILITY RETIREMENTS 

•JOHN DEBRO, Trackman II, 

Fac. Engr. & Maint., Emp. 3-31-53 
HENRY ZDENYS. Bus Repairer, 
Limits, Emp. 6-10-47 

•Retroactive to 2-1-83 



WILLIAM AHERN, 85, Lawndale, 
Emp. 8-15-23, Died 3-17-83 
T BASGALL, 58, -, 
Emp. 6-23-48, Died 1-29-83 
FRANK BENANTl, 72, Kimball. 
Emp. 4-10-43, Died 3-18-83 
EDWARD BOOMGARN, 78, 77th Street, 
Emp. 12-21-36, Died 3-3-83 
MICHAEL BUBNIC, 89, Lake Street 
Emp. 3-26-45, Died 1-29-83 
DON EDWARDS, 70, West Shops, 
Emp. 7-6-39, Died 3-25-83 
DAVID EICHELBERGER, 42, District A, 
Emp. 6-28-67, Died 2-26-83 
EDWARD FEDEROWICZ. 70. Kedzie, 
Emp. 9-8-42, Died 3-3-83 
JOSEPH GOLDBERG, 73, Howard, 
Emp. 12-9-43, Died 3-25-83 
PAUL HERTEL, 85, Devon, 
Emp. 10-14-26, Died 3-15-83 
THOMAS HYNES, 82, 77th Street, 
Emp. 12-19-33. Died 3-11-83 
CHESTER JONES, 62. 52nd Street, 
Emp. 2-19-48, Died 1-17-83 
FRANK JONES, 79, West Shops, 
Emp. 6-1-22, Died 3-4-83 
LEONARD KIERYS, 54, Plaint Maint., 
Emp. 10-21-74, Died 2-21-83 
CHESTER LAUGHLIN, 59. North Park. 
Emp. 8-29-57, Died 2-25-83 
JOHN LEVICKIS, 72, 52nd Street, 
Emp. 9-15-48, Died 3-27-83 
STANLEY MAZEIKA, 67, Archer, 
Emp. 5-13-42, Died 3-30-83 
EDWARD McDonald, 75, Lawndale, 
Emp. 8-8-42, Died 3-17-83 



SARA McDonnell, 75, General Office, 

Emp. 11-21-52, Died 3-20-83 

EDWARD McELDOWNEY, 70. 

South Shops, 

Emp 2-5-46, Died 3-15-83 

ANTHONY McHUGH, 78, Loop, 

Emp. 11-21-41. Died 3-4-83 

MARTHA MOORE. 43, Forest Glen, 

Emp 7-31-75, Died 2-16-83 

WOODROW MORGANFIELD, 40, Wilson, 

Emp. 6-11-65, Died 2-19-83 

EARL PETERSON, 73, Howard, 

Emp 7-6-29, Died 3-28-83 

LUDMILA POZNIAH, 59, General Office, 

Emp. 6-11-74, Died 3-3-83 

GUY PROCTOR, 86, Kedzie, 

Emp. 7-15-25, Died 2-13-83 

H. REYNOLDS, 44, 77th Street, 

Emp. 3-19-77, Died 2-3-83 

JOSEPH ROCH, 72, General Office, 

Emp. 8-20-41, Died 3-6-83 

JOSEPH SHERIDAN, 79, South Shops, 

Emp. 3-6-43, Died 3-24-83 

MELVIN STOLDT, 75, 69th Street, 

Emp. 10-18-33, Died 3-29-83 

KING TOLBERT, 41, Track, 

Emp. 1-20-66. Died 1-14-83 

CHARLES TREANOR, 59, North Avenue, 

Emp. 1-19-61, Died 2-18-83 

LUIGI TUZZOLINO, 85, Douglas, 

Emp. 11-4-30, Died 3-27-83 

RICHARD VAUGHAN, 71, District A, 

Emp. 3-30-37, Died 3-19-83 

IRVING WEINER, 76, North Park, 

Emp. 6-2-50, Died 3-4-83 

CHARLES WINTER, 83, North Avenue, 

Emp. 12-16-43, Died 3-16-83 



Earns diploma 




Paulette Arlene Smith was recently graduated from DePaul University with a bachelor of 
science degree in physical education. The new DePaul alumnus displays a bouquet of roses 
presented by her proud parents, Clarence and Louise Smith. Mrs. Smith is a West side ticket 
agent. 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 4 



15 



eta EMPLOYEE COUNSELING PROGRAM 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 

"Goal" 
Keep people working 



• ALCOHOLISM 

• DRUGS 

• FINANCIAL 



^22-6114 
222-6115. 



• LEGAL 

• MARITAL 

• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 



CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 



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CTA TRANSrr NEWS 
Volume 36 Numl>er4 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division, Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor Rick Willis 
Graphic Designer; Alexandra Elva 
Contributing Writers: Ted Radakovic, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
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ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to ail active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
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S:=r^^ 7983 Volume 36-Numbers 5 & 6 

FftCf Transit News 




Operator Georgia Harris is greeted by Transportation Manager 

Harry Reddricl( at the ESPP reception held in the Transportation 

Department's conference room. Ms. Harris is Team Four leader, 

52nd Street Garage. 



Operator Robert Kelly, Team Four leader, Limits Garage, is con- 
gratulated by Executive Director Bernard Ford for his team's out- 
standing performance. Raymond Goshe, Limits' Team Three leader, 
/oo/cs on. Ford greeted the Transportation Department's ESPP 
pioneers at a reception, and congratulated the department for 
starting implementation of the program at all operating locations 
following its successful pilot program at Limits Garage. 



ESPP saves 
money, cuts 
complaints 

A new safety and performance pro- 
gram designed to recognize operating 
personnel and make special use of 
their daily input on job-related prob- 
lems has been implemented by the 
Transportation Department. 

Through the all-new Employee 
Safety/ Performance Program, operat- 
ing personnel at all locations may not 
interrelate more efficiently with depart- 
ments throughout the Authority, partic- 
ularly on matters relating to employee- 
management problem solving. 

At the same time, the program re- 
duces expenditures in overtime costs, 
equipment repair bills, and settlements 
of personal injury cases. 

The savings are attributed to the ac- 
tual decreases in absenteeism, acci- 
dents and employee/passenger injury 
cases, which have already been real- 
ized since the implementation of the 
Employee Safety/Performance Pro- 
gram under the auspices of the Trans- 
portation Department's Training and 
Instruction Section. 

Elonzo Hill, director of Training and 
Instruction, said since its inception, the 
new program has enhanced passenger 
relations and reduced the number of 
passenger complaints over last year, 
thus its results are being experienced 
by the most important recipients, the 
riding public. 

Employee Safety/Performance, 
first implemented as a pilot program at 
Limits Garage on January 3, 1982, 
has survived its trial balloon and has 
been extended to 52nd, 69th, and 
Forest Glen Garages, as well as the 
South Section Rail. Hill said the pro- 
gram is expected to be in effect at all 
garages and rail terminals by the end 
of September. 

He said crucial to the success of 
ESPP is the active participation and 
cooperation of all CTA departments, 
as well as the support and cooperation 
of CTA labor and management teams. 

The Training and instruction Section 
director explained that not only does 
ESPP emphasize safe operating prac- 
tices, but gauges the productivity, job 
knowledge, and safety consciousness 




Operator Huey L. Stewart, Team Five leader, 69th Street Garage, is flanked by Area Super- 
intendent of Instruction Paul Kadowal<i (left), and Garage Superintendent Clark Carter as they 
display the Employee Safety/Performance Program plaque for February which Stewart's team 
earned. 



of each operating employee. Hill said 
the innovative program has sparked a 
more enthusiastic and competitive 
spirit on the part of all operating per- 
sonnel to maintain zero accidents as 
well as an exceptional productivity 
record. 

Explaining the mechanics of the 
program. Limits Training Center 
Superintendent Norman Herron said 
training, team selections, and prelimi- 
nary meetings are required to begin 
the program at any operating location. 
He said the number of teams at each 
location is determined by the number 
of assigned operating personnel. Indi- 
vidual team members are named to 
teams according to seniority. The 
average team is comprised of 60 
members. Team leaders and co-lead- 
ers are then selected from within each 
group. 

Once the program is underway at a 
location, instructors monitor the daily 
performance of each team and con- 
duct workshops with team leaders 
on safety and possible safety 
improvements. 

The records of team and individual 
members are then reviewed on the 
basis of chargeable and non-charge- 
able passenger/traffic accidents, injury 
on duty, other reported violations, sus- 
pensions, illness, misses and absences 



without leave, Herron said. 

Commemorative items such as let- 
ters, pins, and plaques are awarded to 
the winning team and its members 
based on performance in a month, 
quarter, or for the year. 

Hill said the impact which ESPP has 
had at Limits Garage is proof of its 
success. He said 322 chargeable and 
non-chargeable passenger/traffic 
accidents, and 58 injuries on duty 
occuned at Limits Garage in 1982. 
Figures for the previous year were 397 
and 73, respectively. Hill said. 

The corresponding percentage of 
decrease in 1982 over 1981 was 19 
per cent for accidents and 21 per cent 
for injuries on duty. Hill said the previ- 
ous safest year at Limits Garage in 
terms of passenger/traffic accidents 
was 1972. The figure for 1982, he 
said, was five per cent lower than that 
of 1972. 

Besides the riding public, other 
direct beneficiaries of ESPP are CTA, 
and CTA employees. "ESPP fosters 
an excellent interchange of ideas be- 
tween employees and management to 
provide new problem-solving tech- 
niques. We are finding it to be a won- 
derful forum for employees to partici- 
pate in the decision-making process," 
Hill said. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Rider praises conductor, 
awards a certificate 





SSS9HHHH1 


n ii^ 


P^^^HK^^^^ljAA^^^H 





A^s. Kara/ R. Pierson, administrative cleric for the College of Advanced Traffic, presents a cer- 
tificate of appreciation to Line Instructor Eugene Embry, a conductor on tlie Lake Dan Ryan 
rapid transit service, for "A most informative and pleasant attitude wtiile working." Taking ttie 
opportunity to also express appreciation for Embry's outstanding service were l\^ictiael 
LaValle (left), director of service, and CTA Chairman h/lichael Cardilli. 



Lake-Dan Ryan Rapid Transit con- 
ductor Eugene Embry keeps his riders 
happy about their daily routine of trav- 
eling on board his train every morning. 

Karol R. Pierson of the College of 
Advanced Traffic was so impressed 
with Embry's cheery approach to his 
job she presented him with a certificate 
of merit "For a most informative and 
pleasant attitude while working." 

The certificate, designed by Ms. 
Pierson, an administrative clerk, came 
after she rode Embry's train one morn- 
ing. "A ray of sunshine enveloped me 
and caused me to smile as I boarded 
the train," she said. "The conductor 
wished everyone a good morning and 
announced the time. 

"Subsequently, at each stop he an- 
nounced the train, gave the time, and 
welcomed everybody aboard with a 
cheery good morning. He also advised 
riders of the businesses located at 
various stops." 

Ms. Pierson complimented Embry 
as being "informative and humorous. 
He adds a certain dignity to the ride 
which takes passengers into their own 
world for the work day," she said. She 
noted that the certificate of merit pre- 
sented the conductor represents "the 
spirit of all passengers whose days he 
helps to brighten. We share in the giv- 
ing," she said. 



Kudos for Eugene Embry, who 
joined CTA in April 1968, are nothing 
new, but a certificate of merit from a 
rider to an employee is a CTA first. 
"I'm very pleased to know that I've 
brightened someone's day," said 
Embry. "It's what I like doing. 

"I take pride in my work and try to 
do it the way I think it should be done. 
I also try to put myself in the other per- 
son's shoes when I'm working. I know 
that sometimes people are not sure of 
where they are going or how to get to 
a certain place, so 1 try to provide that 
information," said Embry. 

CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli 
praised Embry for his outstanding per- 
formance. The chairman told Ms. 
Pierson who was accompanied by her 
supervisor, Ms. Joyce Whitaker, "We 
have many employees who are doing 
an outstanding job, but there are not 
many people who will come forward 
as you have to express appreciation. 
We appreciate you for what you have 
done." 

Chairman Cardilli later introduced 
Ms. Pierson and Ms. Whitaker to 
Embry's union president, Ron Flowers 
of Division 308, Amalgamated Transit 
Union. They were also treated to a 
tour of the Control Center by Director 
of Service Michael LaVelle. 



From the Chairman 

The season 
to be friendly 




As Chicago approaches the summer 
season of tourism and recreation, our 
thoughts should turn to helping people 
on the move. Newcomers, bewildered 
by their unfamiliarity with our city, will 
be rushing to keep appointments with 
friends and business associates, and 
searching for interesting places to go 
and things to do. Chicagoans and visi- 
tors alike will also have to endure our 
hot, humid, summer weather, while try- 
ing to make the most of the recreation 
and enjoyment that summer brings. 

As transit employees, we must ex- 
tend ourselves in a professional, friend- 
ly, and courteous manner to inquiring 
visitors, excited vacationers, and 
weary commuters. Because we serve 
so many people each day, performing 
our jobs in an efficient and helpful 
manner can contribute greatly to 
everyone's enjoyment of the summer 
season. 

Perhaps the best way to serve riders 
is to imagine yourself in their place. 
You will soon understand the impor- 
tance of smooth vehicle operation, 
timely arrival at transfer points, and a 
concern for safety and rider comfort. 
And you will realize the value of a 
friendly greeting and willingness to 
help riders along by answering ques- 
tions about your route and connecting 
services. 

So let's all have a wonderful sum- 
mer, by performing our jobs in a man- 
ner that will spread the spirit of courte- 
sy and friendliness that makes Chicago 
a great city. 



>^2«>^5<I 



1983 Vol.36— NOS.5&6 




Engine J-611 is out of retirement and back in action. Norloik and Western's J-Class steam engine, #611, built in 1950 in NWs Roanoke shops, 
was one of 14 special steam passenger engines used to pull passenger trains in the final days of steam. It produces 5,200 horsepower, twice 
that of the usual diesel passenger engine. After spending over 20 years in the Roanoke Transportation Museum, the engine was towed to Birm- 
ingham, Ala., for a complete overhaul. (Norfolk and Western Railway Photo, courtesy of TRAINS Magazine) 

Railroad travel is still fun and exciting 



When Amtrak, the nation's passen- 
ger rail corporation, was formed in 
1971 , the passenger train seemed to be 
a dying breed. Many thought Amtrak 
would be a new beginning, or the be- 
ginning of the end of the passenger 
train. 

Through the efforts of thousands of 
Amtrak employees, millions of pas- 
sengers, and hundreds of supporting 
groups, the passenger train has been 
making a strong comeback in recent 
years. 

One such group which has done 
much to promote passenger rail travel 
is the 20th Century Railroad Club of 
Chicago. Like Amtrak, the 20th Cen- 
tury Railroad Club was formed in 
1971. The purpose of the club was to 
cultivate an appreciation of the his- 
tory, lore, and socio-economic impor- 
tance of the railroad industry in North 



America. The club's membership has 
grown steadily through the years, as 
well as its activity and visibility. 

Its activities, especially its rail excur- 
sions, have appealed not only to rail 
enthusiasts, but to a wide variety of in- 
dividuals and families. The excursions 
offer something for everyone— a ride 
on the train where one can relax, talk, 
sightsee, have a drink, meet new peo- 
ple, or enjoy the ride in solitude. The 
excursions run to a wide variety of 
functions— from football games to the 
Illinois State Fair. 

This summer, the 20th Century 
Railroad Club will sponsor several 
excursions on a special train pulled by 
a steam locomotive. Two trips will run 
to Decatur, Illinois, on July 31 and 
August 6, 1983, and two trips to Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, on July 30 and 
August 7, 1983. All excursions will 



depart from and return to Chicago's 
Union Station at Canal and Adams. 
The trains will leave at 8 a.m. and re- 
turn so that connections may be made 
with late evening suburban trains. Each 
trip will cover close to 300 miles. 

The locomotive which will pull these 
special trains is the Norfolk & West- 
ern Railway's "J" class *611. The 
locomotive was placed in service by 
the Norfolk & Western in May of 
1950, and saw service on the N&W 
and many passenger trains in the 
South. The locomotive ran in service 
until it was retired by the railroad in 
1959. The 611 was donated to the 
City of Roanoke (Va.) by the Norfolk 
& Western and placed in the city's 
Museum of Transportation. In 1981 
the Norfolk Southern Railroad (the 
merged Norfolk & Western and The 
Southern Railroad) leased the 611 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



from the museum and completely re- 
stored it. 

The train 611 will pull from Chicago 
this summer will consist of both open- 
window and air-conditioned coaches. 
In the center of the train a car will pro- 
vide coach passengers with food, bev- 
erages, and souvenirs at reasonable 
prices. Two specially designed open- 
door coaches behind the locomotive 
will be available for enthusiasts who 
wish to record the sounds of the 
locomotive. 

For those who want to experience 
more of the real luxury of riding a 
train, a special premium-fare, first- 
class section will be available. First- 
class passengers will have access to 
two full-length dome cars, the dining 
car from the Norfolk Southern's busi- 
ness train, and the Mardi Gras, a 
round-end observation car which op- 
erated on the Illinois Central Railroad's 
famed "City of New Orleans." 

The first-class fare will include meals 
on board the train and unlimited bev- 
erages. First-class passengers will also 
be served by the club's famous white- 
jacketed car hosts, who will see to the 
passengers' every need. Coach tickets 
will be $49.95. First-class tickets cost 
$99.95. 

Numerous opportunities will be pro- 
vided for photos of the locomotive and 
the train. In addition, a photo/sound 
run-by is scheduled for each trip. 

For further information, contact 
Mike Cramer of the Public Affairs/ 
Consumer Services Department in the 
Mart, Room 730, phone: 664-7200, 
Ext. 3367. Or call the 20th Century 
Railroad Club's Steam Hotline, 
387-6000. 

Cramer also has information on the 
20th Century Club's many other one- 
day excursions planned for the sum- 
mer and fall in 1983. Trips will be to 
such places as "Railroad Days" at 
Galesburg, Illinois (June 11); two one- 
day trips to the Wisconsin Dells (June 
23 and July 25) ; a special train to the 
State Fair in Springfield (August 6), 
and fall foliage train to Dubuque- 
Galena. These excursions will use 
chartered Amtrak drains and will fea- 
ture some of the most modern railroad 
equipment in use in this country. The 
club's white-jacketed car hosts will be 
on board each train to assist passen- 
gers and answer questions. For infor- 
mation, call the club's Excursion-train 
Hotline, 846-3600. 



Five graduates 'strive for excellence' 



M 


p 



Striving for excellence are new management and skills orientation program graduates (left to 
right) Byron Winburn, William Claiborne, Robert Loughran, Ulysee Coley, and Frank Jones. 



Transportation Manager Harry 
Reddrick has named five supervisory 
personnel to new assignments at the 
assistant superintendent level. 

The appointments were made fol- 
lowing the graduation of the super- 
visors in the first class of the recently 
created management and skills orien- 
tation program which was devised by 
the Training/Instruction Section staff 
directed by Elonzo Hill. The training 
coordinator was William Sholdice. 

The new appointees are Assistant 
Superintendents Ulysee Coley. far 
north area; Byron Winburn, far south, 
and William Claiborne, near south. 
Rail/Bus Controllers Robert Loughran 
and Frank Jones were both assigned 
to the Control Center at the Merchan- 
dise Mart. 

The 15-day management and skills 
orientation program which qualified 
the five men for their new positions 
encompasses training segments which 
were part of both CTA's Management 
Institute in the early 70s, and the more 
recent Management Professional 
Institute. The new program covers the 
gamut of instruction on superintend- 
ent's tasks from motivation and per- 
formance to policy and administration, 
Sholdice said. 

Following the presentation of cer- 
tificates of training, Ulysee Coley said 
instructors led him and other trainees 



through various aspects of manage- 
ment in a manner which challenged 
them to "strive for excellence," exem- 
plifying the class motto that was 
fostered by Sholdice. 

"Striving for excellence was not only 
our class motto, but was our objec- 
tive," said Coley. "We plan to remind 
each other frequently of this motto as 
we go our separate ways to various job 
assignments," he added. 

William Claiborne, a former bus in- 
structor with 22 years of service, said 
the three-week training provided infor- 
mation which will be useful beyond the 
job. "This is good information for 
one's personal life," said Claiborne. 

Voicing agreement with Claiborne 
was former RTA Travel Information 
Supervisor Robert Loughran, senior 
member of the class with 34 years of 
service. Loughran praised the instruc- 
tors for being very thorough. "I 
thought I knew something about trans- 
portation. There is so much here to 
help an individual," said Loughran. 

Transportation Manager Reddrick 
praised the new program and its train- 
ing staff for an outstanding job. He told 
Transportation Department managers 
that more innovations are planned for 
the newly created program, and indi- 
cated that future classes will accom- 
modate more personnel. 



1983 Vol.36— NOS.5&6 



Com mendation Corner 



Sam Thomas (Washington ga- 
rage) received a note of thanks 
from Kathleen Mullaghy, of the 
Little Brothers of the Poor, for 
his courtesy while operating a 
Special Services bus. "As a 
staff member, I v\/as assigned 
to follow one of the buses and 
assist the driver in picking up 
our elderly friends. I want to let 
you know that Sam Thomas, the 
driver, was not only competent 
and efficient, but had a wonder- 
ful disposition. He was friendly 
and very helpful, and was a joy 
to work with. Many of the elder- 
ly people commented on what 
a nice bus driver they had. I 
think you should be proud he 
represents the CTA so well." 



Kenneth Richards (now at Limits garage) was admired 
by Mrs. L. Quarles, of Jeffery Boulevard, for "his courteous 
and skillful manner" as operator of No. 6 Jeffery and No. 14 
South Lake Shore Express buses. "It's seldom you see 
someone willing to smile, offer assistance, and show pa- 
tience at the beginning of a work day. He gives the impres- 
sion of someone who is interested in his work and con- 
cerned with the safety of his passengers, regardless of condi- 
tions. All of this contributes to a big plus in Mr. Richards' 
favor, and I would appreciate your informing him of this let- 
ter and our thoughts therein." 




Jennifer Johnson (North Sec- 
tion) was the agent at Grand in 
the State Street subway where 
William Crawford went on his 
way home to Seminary Avenue. 
"In my haste, I paid Jennifer 
and left my wallet, which con- 
tained the essentials of my en- 
tire life, on the ticket counter. It 
was not until I was in my neigh- 
borhood grocery store that I 
discovered my loss. However, 
when I arrived home, a neigh- 
bor had attached a note to my 
door stating that my wife had 
received a call at work from 
Jennifer, who said she would 
hold on to my wallet until I re- 
turned. Thanks to Jennifer for 
her honesty and integrity." 



Maurice Preacely (Archer garage) was called "a very 
special driver" by Marie Vaughan, of South Park Terrace, in 
the Dearborn Park development, who was a rider on his No. 
62 Archer bus. "I am a senior citizen who rides the buses 
daily because I go to church, and in all my travels 1 have to 
depend on the CTA and RTA for transportation. When I get 
on the bus driven by Driver No. 8895, he makes my day 
because he is truly gracious in every way. It is such a plea- 
sure to ride with him. By writing you this letter about one of 
your very special drivers, I am also trying to show my 
gratitude to all concerned." 



Henry Harper and Melvin Perry (both of Washington 
garage) are appreciated by Oddesa Powell, of West Cermak 
Road, who uses their Special Service buses. "Your service 
has given me a measure of independence in traveling, 
which helps me get around more. I want very much to com- 
mend two of your drivers who make using the service so 
wonderful. Henry Harper, who picks me up, is very 
thoughtful in doing little things that make you feel human, 
like watching for holes in the street to avoid jarring a person. 
He also has a positive attitude in talking to people, and 
doesn't bring his problems to his job. Melvin Perry also 
shows his concern for my well-being. I recommend them as 
very efficient drivers." 



David Gaston (North Park garage) was considered 
"courteous and helpful" by Mrs. Harry Bernsteen, of North 
Sheridan Road, who was a rider on his No. 147 Outer Drive 
Express bus. "1 boarded the bus at Berwyn with a heavy 
bag. He put the brake on the bus and helped me with my 
package. When 1 dismounted at Catalpa, he again helped 
me with my bundle. I surely appreciate his courteous and 
thoughtful help, and think he should be commended for 
this. 1 am handicapped and appreciate this kind of 
thoughtfulness." 



Diane Thomas (77th Street garage) was praised by E. 
Thurton, of South Chicago Avenue, for "her concern on the 
job. About 5:45 p.m., a man walked in front of her east- 
bound (No. 95E 93rd/95th) bus, and after crossing the 
street, he stood on the sidewalk. Then he walked back in 
front of the bus and collapsed. No one came to his aid until 
she parked her bus and picked him up all by herself. I was 
quite impressed by her concern, especially since the bus had 
quite a few men riding, and not one tried to help. Since the 
public always seems ready to beef about your employees, I 
thought you ought to know about this special lady." 



Dorothy Weeks (North Avenue garage) was commended 
by Sylvia Hudson, of West Jackson Boulevard. "I think that 
when a person can drive a bus every day and deal with all 
kinds of people, and yet maintain a sweet personality her- 
self, she deserves to be honored for her service to the public. 
I am speaking of Dorothy Weeks. It's always a pleasure to 
board the No. 126 Jackson bus and see her smiling face and 
pleasant disposition, and receive a pleasant greeting from 
her. To let a person know their value is to encourage them 
to go on and do even better because they know people are 
watching them." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Thanks— for a 
job well done 

Employees who have received commendations 
since the last listing. 

Hasan Abed, Archer 

James Barlow, North Avenue 
Mattie Battiste, Forest Park 
Charlotte Brent, West Section 

Glenn Carpenter, Archer 
Wafer Carter, 69th Street 
Marvin Chachere, North Park 
Thomas Christian, District D 
Marvin Covington, Limits 

William Davis, North Avenue 
George Davis Jr., 69th Street 
John Dotson, North Avenue 

Cynthia Florence, Near North 

Jeffrey Gilbert, Howard/Kimball 
Christopher Gilbert Jr., Forest Glen 
Andrew Gowin, Archer 
Celester Gray Jr., North Avenue 

Marvin Harris, Lawndale 
Cecilio Hernandez, Forest Glen 
Willie James, North Park 
Robert Jenkins Jr., North Park 
Tyree Johnson, Forest Glen 

Robert Lawson, North Park 
Nathaniel Lee, Ashland Terminal 

Nelson Machado, Forest Glen 
William McCotry Jr., 69th Street 
Jodie McGuire, North Park 
Edgar Mollinedo, North Park 
Robert Moreno, North Avenue 
Linda Morgan, Howard/Kimball 
Charles Murrell, Limits 

Robert Owens, 69th Street 

Drago Pancic, North Park 
Marlene Phillips, North Section 

Miriam Rodriguez, Howard/Kimball 

Vera Smith, Archer 

Allen Smith III, 77th Street 

Johnny Taylor, North Park 
Sam Thomas, Washington 
Lee Thompson, North Park 
Stanley Thompson, Forest Park 
Arthur Turner, Douglas/Congress 
Willy Turner, Stores-West 

Walter Walker Jr., Lawndale 
Louis Ward, North Park 
Pearlie Williams, North Park 
Frederick Wilson Jr., 77th Street 

John Zupko, Howard/Kimball 




Special effort in their jobs earned tfiem special recognition as 'A Day in CTA ' honorees. 
Proudly displaying the certificates which they received from Transportation t\/lanager Harry 
Reddrick (left) are bus operator Angel DeLapaz, Forest Glen; agent supervisor James 
McPhee, and bus operator W. B. Jones, 69th Street. Reddrick greeted the three employees 
at the power supervisor's cubicle in the Control Center. 

Extraordinary service earns 
*Day in CTA' honors for three 



An alert agent supervisor, James 
McPhee, is credited with aiding police 
in the apprehension of a 32-year old 
man in connection with the knifing of a 
73-year old man near the Argyle "L" 
station. 

As the suspect attempted to escape, 
McPhee followed him and, using a 
portable radio, relayed his location to 
another employee who was on the 
telephone to police. A short time later, 
police arrived and arrested the man. 

McPhee received special recognition 
on "A Day in CTA" for responding to 
the elderly victim's plight. Transpor- 
tation Manager Harry Reddrick wel- 
comed the 10-year veteran along with 
bus operators Angel DeLapaz and W. 
B. Jones, who were also honored for 
extraordinary service during fires at 
their respective garages. 

DeLapaz of Forest Glen was injured 



January 1 by an explosion as he 
prepared to move a bus away from 
another burning vehicle in the garage 
bay. The injured operator had already 
removed one bus from the garage 
when the blast occurred. DeLapaz, 
who joined CTA in 1975, discovered 
the fire in the bay as he was preparing 
to pull out, and reported it to the 
Control Center. 

Four days later, W. B. Jones was on 
duty at 69th Street Garage when an 
early morning fire ravaged that facil- 
ity. Jones, a 10-year CTA veteran, 
reported the fire immediately, and 
began pulling buses out of the garage. 
Reports from the garage superinten- 
dent's office said at least 20-30 buses 
were believed saved and many injuries 
averted as a result of Jones' thinking 
and disregard for his own safety. 



7963 Vrl.36—Nos.5&6 



Culture Buses begin 7th season 




Culture Buses 



ui^ Sundays and Holidays 
, ^,, >„^, ,#-" Now through Sept. 25, 1983 
>'^" '^ V^<^^ 70/35 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. 



^^"^ 




5i'% #IPiO?» Pife;^ 





Fare Is a Sunday Supertranster. Only $1.40 
tar adults and 70 cents lor seniors, children, or 
handicapped persons, EXACT FARE FtEQUIFtED 
WHEN BOARDING. 

Or you can use your Supertranster already 
purchased for alFday riding on a Sunday or 
Holiday '" 






i your CTA Monthly Pass. 



Suburts: l.aOO-972-TVOO (loll liae) 



Chicago Transit Authority 



The "CTA Culture Buses" poster, featuring illustrations by Erv Harris, training aids techni- 
cian, is the latest Culture Bus promotional piece designed by the Publications section. The 
bright yellow posters with earth-toned illustrations are displayed on CTA rapid transit plat- 
forms and inside museums and other Culture Bus stops. A very limited supply of additional 
posters (30" x 46") may be purchased, in person only, at the CTA Public Affairs office, Rm, 
734, Merchandise fi/lart, during regular office hours, or at the bus stop in front of the Art 
Institute during Culture Bus operating hours. Price is $5,00 each. 



Big Bend buses used for the service 
are too bulky to be mistaken for swal- 
lows, and Chicago's weather could 
hardly be confused with that of Capis- 
trano, California. Nevertheless, just 
like our faithful feathered friends, 
CTA's Culture Buses have returned to 
Chicago streets for the seventh con- 
secutive season to take area residents 
and visitors alike to the city's major 
cultural attractions. 

Service on all three Culture Bus 
routes began Sunday, April 24, and 
will continue every Sunday and holi- 
day until September 25. Round trips 
from the Art Institute take about an 
hour and a quarter on the South and 
North routes, and an hour and a half 
on the West. 

South route buses operate every 20 
minutes, from 10:40 a.m. until 4:40 
p.m. North route buses leave the Art 
Institute every 30 minutes between 
10:45 and 4:45. And this year, for the 
first time, West route buses will be 
operating at 30-minute intervals all 
season between 10:35 and 4:05. For 
rider convenience, schedules are listed 
on Culture Bus literature. 

To make the rides educational as 
well as convenient and economical, 
commentators on each bus inform 
riders about Chicago history and 
points of interest along the routes. The 
information is updated every year and 
covers everything from LaSalle's ex- 
plorations of 300 years ago to plans 
for the World's Fair of 1992. 

Riding the Culture Bus costs the 
same as last year. For adults, it's the 
price of a Supertranster ($1.40) or the 
flash of a monthly riding pass. For chil- 
dren, senior citizens, or handicapped 
riders, it's 70 cents. For the severely 
disabled who regularly use CTA's Spe- 
cial Services buses, there is a Special 
Services Culture Bus, which operates 
every second Sunday. 

Supertransfers that are issued to Cul- 
ture Bus riders have a "C" stamped on 
them. By special arrangement, this pro- 
vides riders with discounts on the 
price of admission to the John Hancock 
Observatory and Ripley's Believe It Or 
Not Museum, on the North route, and 
to the Sears Tower Skydeck on the 
West route. 

Any way you look at it, the Culture 
Bus is still flying high, and it's a feath- 
er in CTA's cap that every visitor 
and hometowner should know about 
and use. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



TV monitors 
improve vault 
security 

Installation has been completed for 
closed circuit television cameras with 
time lapse video recorders including 
monitors in garage superintendents' 
offices at all bus garage vault islands. 

The contract for the project, includ- 
ing a total of 35 cameras, 25 monitors 
and 12 time-lapse video cassette tape 
recorders for $148,000, was awarded 
to Video & Sound Service, inc., of 
North Riverside, the lowest of three 
qualified bidders. 

This project, begun last October, 
provides improved television monitor- 
ing of vault areas at garages for in- 
creased security. 

The system enables each station su- 
perintendent to monitor and record 
the activities of box pullers inside buses 
as well as at vaults. Karlis Pliuksis, 
communications design engineer, Fa- 
cilities Engineering and Maintenance 
department, was project manager. 

"This interesting project applied cur- 
rent state-of-the-art design in a high 
tech field to deal with a universal prob- 
lem that recently had a high level of 
visibility at the CTA," said Thomas 
Wolgemuth, manager, Facilities Engi- 
neering and Maintenance. 




Video monitoring system, as shown at North Avenue garage, will improve vault island 
security at all bus garages. 




1983 Vol.36— Nos. 5 &6 



Day in CTA 
honors four alert 
bus operators 

Knowing how to apply cardiopul- 
monary resuscitation may have been 
the difference in a life threatening situ- 
ation at North Avenue garage recently 
as three operators responded to a co- 
worker who collapsed in the train 
room, apparently of a heart attack. 

Operators Elizabeth Duren, Jos^" 
Portell, and Eddie Carey began im- 
mediately to revive the man, after he 
had lapsed into an unconscious state 
shortly before 6 a.m. on February 18 
as personnel on the morning shift were 
starting to work. Rescue efforts were 
underway in seconds as Mrs. Duren, 
without experience, training, or hesi- 
tation, began artificial respiration by 
simply following methods she had ob- 
served others perform. 

Portell, and Carey, a former Green 
Beret who saw action in Viet Nam, 
assisted Mrs. Duren in restoring the 
man's breathing. Both men, familiar 
with CPR techniques, received train- 
ing while serving in the Army. "There 
was really no time to think about it. We 
just did what we had to do." Empha- 
sizing that it was an automatic re- 
sponse by the trio, Portell said, "When 
you see something like that you just 
want to help, and that's what we did." 

William Parnum, assistani superin- 
tendent at .No'ih Avenue, said coloi 
began returning to liit aUitken opera- 
tor's cheeks as Mrs. Duren and Portell 
continued to press on the man's chest. 

Parnum said Carey assisted Fire 
Department paramedics when they 
arrived, by continuing artificial respi- 
ration as the paramedics placed the 
stricken man in the ambulance and 
began applying oxygen and injecting 
medication. Parnum said Carey's ef- 
forts continued diligently until addi- 
tional medical help arrived. By that 
time a heart beat and slight pulse had 
been restored, Parnum said. Para- 
medics were grateful for the assistance 
rendered by the three CTA employees. 

Carey has been a CTA employee 
since 1967. Portell and Mrs. Duren, 
both 1983 Bus Roadeo participants, 
joined CTA in 1978 and '79, 
respectively. 

Meanwhile, a fourth bus operator 
honored last month on "A Day in 




CTA bus operators (left to right) Eddie Carey, Elizabeth Duren, James Mayes, and Jose 
Portell enjoy their visit to the Power Control section of the CTA Control Center during 'A Day 
in CTA.' Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick (third from left) and Director, Administra- 
tion and Performance Control, Robert Desvignes (far right) praised the operators for their 
prompt response during crisis situations. 



CTA," was a member of the "Winning 
Circle 20" in CTA's first Bus Roadeo. 
Operator James E. Mayes of the 69th 
Street garage, was the recipient of 
special recognition in connection with 
the recovery of a lost child. 

Mayes garnered 542 points in CTA's 
1981 Roadeo contest to place 15th in 
the winning circle. He attributed his 
success in part to the support he re- 
ceived from his wife, Beverly, and 
their four children. 

It was that same strong family orien- 
tation which drew Operator Mayes' at- 



tention to a small boy, whom he spot- 
ted wandering in a heavy industrial 
area near Ashland and 36th Street, 
late in the rain-threatening afternoon 
of February 16. "I stopped my bus to 
question the child and discovered that 
this was indeed the same one an- 
nounced earlier as being lost," said 
Mayes. 

The report, made only minutes ear- 
lier over bus monitors, urged opera- 
tors to be alert for the boy. Mayes said 
he took the child aboard his bus and 
held him until police arrived. 




Four North Section rail operating employees have graduated from the Transporta- 
tion department's Rail Clerk Training Program and have become pool rail terminal 
clerks. Proudly displaying their achievement awards are (left to right): Randy 
Antokal, Steven James, Donald Seay, and Walter Holmes. Joining in the gradua- 
tion ceremony are (standing, from left) Louis Loebbaka, chief clerk, Howard ter- 
minal; Gerald West, rail instructor; Dennis Closs, superintendent, Howard; and 
(foreground) Arthur Hubbard, superintendent. Rail Instruction. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA Third Rail 
Roundup Contest 




CTA's finest rail operating employ- 
ees will compete this summer in the 
first annual CTA Third Rail Roundup 
Contest, an intense competition that 
will test job knowledge and operating 
skills. The Third Rail Roundup is an 
expansion of the Bus Roadeo concept 
to CTA rail operations. Since 1981, 
the Bus Roadeo has proven to be an 
exciting and challenging contest that 
has promoted the development of su- 
perior operating skills, keener aware- 
ness of the importance of safety proce- 
dures, and improvement of morale 
with a greater sense of professionalism 
among operating employees. Now rail 
operating employees can gain similar 
benefits through participation in the 
Third Rail Roundup, and enjoy friend- 
ly competition with fellow employees 
while vying for valuable prizes. 



Entry and eligibility ^^^^■^^■■B 

Entry blanks may be obtained at 
each operating employee's home ter- 
minal, and must be filled out and sub- 
mitted to the terminal superintendent 
between June 23 and July 2, 1983. 

Full-time rail operating employees 
may enter the Third Rail Roundup on- 
ly if they have: 

-at least two years of continuous 
service as of the date of contest 
entry 
-qualified as a motorman at least 12 
months prior to the date of contest 
entry 
-worked a minimum of 200 days 
within the preceding 12 months 



-worked a minimum of 10 days as a 
motorman or switchman during 
the preceding 12 months 
In addition, to be accepted as a con- 
testant, a records review must indicate 
that, during the twelve months pre- 
ceding date of entry, the rail operating 
employee must have had: 
-no suspensions 

-no chargeable passenger com- 
plaints 
-no uniform violations 
-no more than 2 misses 
-no more than 2 sick entries (not 

counting lOD's) 
-no more than 5 minor violations 
(no more than 3 minor violations 
for switchmen) 
-no chargeable accidents 
Lists of eligible contestants will be 
posted at each employee's home ter- 
minal on July 6, 1983. 

Any entrant who does not continue 
to meet the above criteria during the 
life of this contest may be disqualified, 
subject to review by the Eligibility 
Committee. 



Prizes i 



Competition schedule ■■i^^^i^^h 

During the week of July 10, 1983, 
applicants will take a written test at 
their home terminals. To qualify for 
further competition, applicants must 
achieve a score of 70 percent or better 
on test items relating to signals, stand- 
ard operating procedures, trouble- 
shooting, CTA rules and regulations, 
and knowledge of equipment. Con- 
testants will also be evaluated on a 
points system for uniform and appear- 
ance, which will become a part of their 
total scores. 

From July 17 to July 30, 1983, qual- 
ified contestants will participate in the 
terminal level competition at their 
home terminals. This competition will 
require a practical demonstration of 
preparation of a train for service in 
the yard and the clearing of various 
troubleshooting problems. The eight- 
een highest scoring contestants sys- 
temwide, regardless of terminal as- 
signment, will then advance to the 
"Roundhouse 18" final competition. 
Names of "Roundhouse 18" partici- 
pants will be posted at all terminals on 
August 4. 

The "Roundhouse 18" Systemwide 
Competition will take place on the 
Wells Street portion of the Loop 'L' 
and a portion of the Ravenswood 
Branch on one or more Sundays dur- 
ing August, 1983. The "1983 CTA 
Third Rail Roundup Champion" will 
be determined by a series of practical 
skills tests involving operation of a two 
car train, troubleshooting ability, and 
uniform and appearance. 



The "1983 CTA Third Rail Round- 
up Champion" (first place winner), as 
determined at the "Roundhouse 18" 
Competition, will receive a trophy and 
an all-expense-paid (transportation, 
meals, hotel) 5-day, 4-night trip for 
two to Washington, D.C. 

A Chairman's Cup will also be 
awarded to the home terminal of the 
first place winner. 

The Second Place Winner will re- 
ceive a trophy and a $500 Series EE 
Savings Bond. 

The Third Place Winner will receive 
a trophy and a $200 Series EE Sav- 
ings Bond. 

The Fourth Place Winner will re- 
ceive a trophy and a $100 Series EE 
Savings Bond. 

Each contestant who participates in 
the "Roundhouse 18" Final Competi- 
tion will receive a "CTA Third Rail 
Roundup " belt buckle, baseball cap or 
engineer's cap, and special recognition 
certificate. 

The highest scoring contestant from 
each terminal in the terminal level 
competition will receive a special 
award, and every contestant who qual- 
ifies for terminal level competition will 
receive a pair of dinner-theater tickets 
and a special recognition certificate. 

1983 CTA Third Rail Roundup 
Committee ^^i^Bi^H^^Hi^Hl^iB 



Arthur C. Hubbard, superintendent, 
Rail Instruction, is the 1983 CTA Third 
Rail Roundup Chairman. 

Subcommittees and subcommittee 
chairman are as follows: Materials and 
Equipment, Len Wiksten, director. 
Facilities Maintenance; Finance and 
Awards, Arliss Jones, transportation 
programs analyst; Eligibility and Crite- 
ria, Ardis Morris, superintendent, 95th 
Street Terminal; Testing Procedures, 
James Zepp, assistant superintend- 
ent,, Rail Instruction; Publicity, Bill 
Sholdice, acting superintendent, 
Training; Volunteer Services, Linda 
Grysbeck, training programs analyst; 
Maintenance and Transportation 
Coordination, Les Racker, area super- 
intendent. Control Center, and Com- 
munications Coordinator, James 
Washington, assistant superintendent, 
Control Center. 

The 1983 CTA Third Rail Roundup 
Advisory Committee includes Elonzo 
Hill, director. Training/instruction; 
Robert Desvignes, director, Adminis- 
tration/Performance Control; Paul 
Kadowaki, area superintendent, in- 
struction, and Robert Janz, area su- 
perintendent. Rail Service. 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 5&6 





In the 77th Street garage yard, a list of buses to be sold as scrap is checked by 
Mrs. Harmon with Bill Bailey (sunglasses), unit supervisor, Storeroom 50, and Dalton 
Gllllland, warehouseman. 

Henry Farley, unit supervisor. Lower Yard, and Mrs. Harmon inspect a pile of scrap 
from recent track work. New timber ties behind them will be used for track renewal 
projects. 

William Roman, director, Stores, and Mrs. Harmon discuss the list of salvage items 
she is preparing for the next sale. 

Mrs. Dorothy Harmon surveys a mountain of scrap In the 77th Street garage yard. As 
a salvage control clerk In the Materials Management department, she will sell this 
pile of junk to the highest bidder. 

Jim Zazula, Storeroom 42 superintendent in Skokie Shop, and Mrs. Harmon Inspect 
scrap roller curtain sign popular with rail buffs. Scrap L' cars, similar to one pictured, 
are stored in Skokie Shop yard for eventual sale. 

Gllllland and Mrs. Harmon discuss impending sale of worn bus brake drums In 77th 
Street garage yard. 



Turning trash inl 



Dorothy Harmon sells junk. 

But she doesn't sell run-of-the-mill 
garage sale-type junk popular with 
bargain-hunting householders. 

She has been salvage control clerk 
in the Materials Management depart- 
ment since 1978, where she has sold 
tons of surplus and scrap materials so 
designated by various CTA depart- 
ments. She has been a CTA employee 
since 1964. 

Mrs. Harmon does have garage 
sales, so-to-speak. At various CTA bus 
garages and rapid transit terminals, 
there are areas and personnel who 
assemble scrap material to be sold. 
Most of her sales are done through 
competitive bidding, with highest bid- 
der getting the junk and removing it 
from the premises. 

These sales, sometimes mountains 
of junk towering over Mrs. Harmon, 
run into the thousands of dollars, with 
annual sales totals as high as 
$200,000. the proceeds go to CTA's 
Treasury department. 

Other sale items may be purchased 
over-the-counter at fixed prices, by 
transit and nostalgia fans, at either 
Skokie Shop or at the 77th Street 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




garage. The prices of these items are 
set by the departments disposing of 
them. 

"Prices of these individual sales 
have ranged from as low as 25 cents 
for a cardboard box with a CTA logo 
on it to as much as $9,500 for a diesel 
locomotive; waste oil has sold as low 
as 10 cents a gallon," Mrs. Harmon 
said. 

She has even sold items to Holly- 
wood film makers on location in 
Chicago. 

"My most recent sale to a film pro- 
ducer was an old style gooseneck 'L' 
platform lighting fixture. The producer 
was with Universal Studios, and he 
was shooting the film, 'Streets of Fire,' 
in Chicago. 

"Why he wanted this item I don't 
know. Come to think of it, the reasons 
for individual purchases are rarely ex- 
plained," Mrs. Harmon said. 

One of her most requested items is 
the coin changer— the kind fare col- 
lecting 'L' conductors wear. Unfor- 
tunately, the demand far exceeds the 
supply. 

"Many retiring operating employ- 
ees, who had been using coin chang- 



ers for years, have asked to be allowed 
to buy them and keep them as souve- 
nirs. Other CTA employees also buy 
the changers, and whatever is left is 
put on sale," she said. 

So what does go on sale to in- 
dividual buyers, be they transit buffs, 
nostalgia fans, or Hollywood moguls? 

"We sell buses and rapid transit cars 
'as is,' destination roller curtain signs 
from buses and 'L' cars, old platform 
lighting fixtures, 'L' platform station 
signs, old fare registers, pieces of dam- 
aged buses and 'L' cars, turnstiles, and 
the like. 

"The supply of these items is unpre- 
dictable. When we are notified of im- 
pending shipments from the dispens- 
ing departments, we make room for 
them in our sales outlets," Mrs. 
Harmon said. 

Most rapid transit items are sold 
over the counter in Storeroom 42 in 
Skokie Shop. Jim Zazula, storeroom 
superintendent, said sale hours are 
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 

Most bus items are sold in Store- 
room 15 in the 77th Street garage. Bill 
Bailey, storeroom unit supervisor, said 
his sale hours also are 7:30 a.m. to 4 



p.m. Monday through Friday. 

On the bulk scrap side of her sales, 
Mrs. Harmon sells (to the highest bid- 
der) scrap steel, copper, brass, bronze, 
wood, paper, bus batteries, waste oil, 
and the like. 

The way she sees it. there is some- 
thing for everyone— only some things 
take a little longer. 

William Roman, director. Stores, 
said: 

"I feel the salvage control clerk's 
position is an interesting one, especial- 
ly when Stores is asked to dispose of 
an item never handled before in a lim- 
ited time frame. The research that may 
be involved both within CTA and out- 
side gives Mrs. Harmon insights into all 
areas of the Authority. 

"Mrs. Harmon's function as salvage 
control clerk affords her the opportuni- 
ties to deal with people from all walks 
of life. 

"i look upon her as our Ambassador 
of Good Will," Roman said. 

Edward Tobin, manager, Materials 
Management department, noted that 
the job of salvage control clerk has a 
very long history in public transit in 
Chicago. 

It's a way of turning trash into cash. 



1983 Vol. 36— Nos. 58,6 



13 



Gallery of June Graduates in CTA Families 

Here are the proudest pictures of the school year identified by name, school, parent, 

and parent's CTA \Nork location. 




LEON ABBINGTON 

Corliss H S 
Sarah P. Beaty 

West Section 



SONYA ALEXANDER 

Thornton H S 
Etfia Alexander 

West Section 



MICHELLENE 
ANDERSON 

Dunbar H S 
Thomas L. Anderson 

Transportation 



DONALD A. BARKER 

Arlington H S 
Allan R. Barker 

Facil. Eng. & Maint. 



ELLEN J. BARKER 

Northwestern University 

Allan R. Barker 
Facil. Eng. & Maint. 



ARNOLD JEFFREY 
BASSETT 

Proviso East H S 
Fred L. Bassett 

Nortti Avenue 




MARGARET MARY 
BAXA 

Immaculate Heart 

of Mary 

Bill Baxa 

Public Affairs 



JEAN BIESZKI 

Madonna H S 

Eugene H. Bleszkl 

Forest Park 



HAROLD BORDERS 

East Marion H S 
Willie Borders 

North Avenue 



DWAYNE 
BRADFORD 

Chicago Vocational H S 

Nathaniel Bradford 

69th Street 



MRS. CAROL 
BRAZEAU 

College of Dupage 
Paul Brazeau 
North Avenue 



PAULA BRAZEAU 

Glenbard North H S 
Paul Brazeau 
North Avenue 




LATANYA SHEREE 
BROWN 

Notre Dame H S 
John E. Brown 

North Avenue 



ELIZABETH BUDZISZ 

Resurrection H S 
Jerry Budzisz 

North Park 



ALICIA BURNS 

Whitney M Young H S 

John W. Bums 

District C 



CARLA R. 
CAMPBELL 

Liberty H S 
Eddie McCllnton 

Signal fwlaintenance 



ANGELA CARTER 

Corliss H S 

Sam Carter 

Madison & Wabash 



REGINALD CARTER 

St Ignatius H S 

William L. Carter 

77th Street 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



JAMES C. 
COLUER, JR. 

Alan B Shcphard H.S 
James C. Collier, Sr. 

Training Center 



VICTOR EUGENE 
COIXINS. JR. 

Hyde Park Career Academy 

Victor Eugene 

Collins, Sr. 

77th Street 



DAVID CURRIN. JR 

Thornton H S 
David Currln, Sr. 

South District 



DAVID D. 

DAVENPORT 

Victor J Andrew H S 

Leonard D. Davenport 

Skokie Shop 



CYNTHIA MARIA 
DAVIS 

Aquinas Catholic H.S. 

Jessie F. Davis 

Forest Glen 



LENELL DAVIS 

Providence St Mel H S 
Minnie Davis 
North Avenue 




NATAUE E. DEXTER 

Alvemia H.S. 
Jerome Dexter 
.South Shops 



MARK DUNDOVICH 

Holy Cross H.S. 

Uaik Dundovidi 

Skokie Shop 



COPELAND G. EDWARDS. JR. USA M. EMERY 

SINCERERA E. EDWARDS Percy L Julian H.S 

Percy L Julian H.S. Arnold Emery, Sr. 

Copeiand G. Edwards, Sr.— 95th Terminal Limits 
Theresa Edwards— Jefferson Park Terminal 



JOANNA M. ERMON 

Hyde Park H S 

Sylvester Ermon 

77th Street 




CHERYL EVANS 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 

Norris Evans 

Schedules 



LUCRETIA M. 



GARDNER 

Academy of Our Lady 

Mary F. Gardner 

69th Street 



SOCARRITO M. 
GRABOWSKI 

Mother Theodore 

Guerin H.S 

Maria R. Grabowski 

Financial Services 



MAURICE E. HARRIS 



Illinois Wesleyan Univ. 
Erv Harris 
Publications 



MICHELLE D. 



HARRIS 

Illinois Wesleyan Univ. 
Erv Harris 
Publications 



DARLENE A. 
HAWKINS 

DePaul University 

Donald Hawkins 

west Shops 




EDHEIDEWALD 

Curie H.S. 
James HeMewald 

Archer 



DEBBIE HEIDEWALD 

Kelly H.S. 
James Heidewald 

Archer 



MARGARET 

HENNELLY 

Good Counsel H S 

Augustus Hennelly 

Retired 



TIMOTHY HESTER 

St Patrick H S 

John l_ Hester 

Far North 



BRIDGET HOBBS 

Unity Catholic H.S 

Bobby Hobbs 
Washington Garage 



SIMONA A. HUNT 

Hillcrest H S 
Marianne Hunt 

Madison & Wabash 



1983 Vol.36— NOS.5&6 



75 




MICHELLE 

MADELIENE 

HUSTON 

Percy L Julian H S 

Matthew J. Huston 

Limits 



ALPHONSO J. 
JACKSON 

Walther Lutheran H S 

Vemell Jackson 

West Section 



DWAYNE JACKSON 

Drake University 

Roy Jackson 

Claims 



BRENDA JOHNSON 

Fenger H S 

C.V. Johnson 

77th Street 



JULIA JOHNSON 

University of Texas 

Joan Johnson 

Budget 



DENEEN RENEE 

JONES 

Carver H S 

J. Perry Jones 

South Shops 




CECILIA LAPID 

Mather H S 

Erilnda C. Lapid, R.N. 



SUSAN LAPID 

Mather H S 

Eriinda C. LapId, R.N. 



LORl A. U\2ZARA 

Maine South H S 
Joseph T. Lazzara 

Capital Development 



DONNA LEWIS 

DePaul University 

Clinton Lewis 

69th Street 



STEPHANIE D. 
MARBLE 

St Willibrord H.S 

James E. Maible 

Schedules 



COLLETTE MARZEC 

Lockport Township H S 

Edwin J. Marzec 

West Shops 





LOREN McCURTIS 

Proviso East H S 
James L. McCurtls 

Forest Park Terminal 



SYLVIA McGEE 

Fenger H S 

Cleophus McGee 

77th Street 



TERRANCE J. 
MUELLNER 

Holy Cross H S 
Terrance P. Muellner 

Bus Maintenance, 
South 



TONJA MARIE 
MURRY 

Corliss H S 
David E. Murry, Sr. 

Stores. South Shops 



FLEET LEE 
NEIGHBORS 

East Leydcn H S 

Robert Neighbors 

Rosemont Yard 



SILVIA S. 
NEIGHBORS 

Western Illinois 

University 

Robert Nelghtxirs 

Rosemont Yard 




m 




GREGORY L. 
NEWELL 

Dcvibliss H S 

Sammie Newell 

West Section 



PAMELA NEWELL 

Macomber-Whitney H S 

Sammie Newell 

West Section 



JOSEPH MICHAEL 
O'BRIEN 

Mount Carmel H S 
Christopher T. O'Brien 

West Shops 



STEVEN K PAEK 

Maine East H S 

Larry Peek 

Public Affairs 



CHRISTINE 
PATTERSON 

Glenbard Nonh H S 
Paul Brazeau 

North Avenue 



SHERRI PATTERSON 

Bowcn H S 

James L. Patterson 

Schedules 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



YOLANDA L. 

POUNDS 

Corliss H.S. 

George Pounds 

District A 



HEATHER ANN 
QUINLAN 

New Trier H S 

Leonard Quinlan 

North Park 



JAMES T RADOM 

Weber H S 
Henry Radom 

Forest Glen 



ROBERT A. 
REDDRICK 

Crete-Monee H S 
Harry Reddrick 
Transportation 



KEVIN L. REED 

Mendel Catholic H S 

Willie Reed 

Beverly 



THOMAS A. REILLY 

Divine Word Seminary 

Thomas J. Rellly 

Far South 




LOWELL Z. 
REYNOLDS, JR. 

Harper H S. 

Lowell Z. Reynold*, St. 

West Section 



DEBORAE CHER 
ROBINSON 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 

Jackie Robinson 

Limits 



MEUNDA 
ROBINZINE 

Jones Commercial H.S. 

Peailman 
Roblnzlne, Jr. 

District B 



JOHN E. 

SCHNITZIUS 

Holy Cross H S 

Edward J. Schnltzlus 

Forest Glen 



MARGARET 
SCHWAMB 

Maine East H.S. 
Edward Schwamb 

Limits 



CASIMUIR L. 
SIMMONS 

Columbia College 

Wade Simmons 

North Avenue 




SCOTT MARSHALL 

SINGER 

Lake Forest Academy 

Paul L. Singer 

Limits 



BRIAN A STEPP 

Purdue University 

Thomas J. Stepp 

Claims 



DALE SZPISJAK 

Marmion Military 

Academy 

Joseph Maslarz 

Retired 



MARTHA 
TRITTHARDT 

Fcnton H.S. 

Alvln Tritthardt 

Forest Glen 



CHRISTOPHER 
VARELAS 

Kenwood Academy 

Robert Julan, Jr. 

Transportation 

Margo Julan— Insurance 



JOHN VUKOVICS 

Carmel H.S. 
John Vukovlcs 

Skokie Shop 




ARLENE WHITE 

Hirsch H S 
Charlene McFadden 

Control Center 



STACEY WHITE 

Percy L Julian H S 
Carolyn While 
West Section 



LA TONYA WILLIAMS 

Tuskegee Institute 

Eddie Williams 

77th Repair 



PAMELA WILSON 
Madonna H S 
Gary Wilson 
Skokie Shop 



ADRIAN ZAPATA 

Whitney M Young H.S. 
Carlos Z. Zapata 

Lawndale 



1983 Vol.36— N0S.5&6 



17 



ZAP 



A»W»A»R»D»S 



Personnel at 61st Street/Racine 
Maintenance Terminal entered the 
first quarter of 1983 with contin- 
ued success in CTA's Zero Acci- 
dent Program as they took their 
ninth consecutive first place ZAP 
certificate since 1981. 

First place ZAP awards also 
went to maintenance personnel at 
Limits and Forest Glen Garages. 
Winners in the Bus Shops compe- 
tition included personnel in the 
Mechanical, Upholstery, Utility, 
Convertor, Inspection, Radiator 
and the Paint Shops. Rail Shop 
competitors taking first place Zero 
Accident Program certificates 
were personnel in the Armature 
Room and the Axle Shop. 




First place ZAP certificates at Bus Stiops are displayed by representatives of the winr)ir)g facilities. 
They are (from left), Ed Meskinan, Print Shop foreman; Bob Mandujano, acting foreman, Upholstery 
Shop; Rudolph Goode, foreman, Regrease and Teardown Area; David Madden, acting foreman. 
Converter Area; John Dopak, foreman. Radiator Shop; John Ware, acting foreman. Hoist Area; and 
John Vidas, acting foreman. Utility Area. 




David Kowalski (left), unit supervisor. North Rail, presents the coveted ZAP certificate for first place to Charlie Nevels day foreman at 61st/Racln0 
Maintenance Terminal. Employees (right) assigned to the terminal attended the presentation of this ninth ZAP award. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





James Langley (right), maintenance day foreman at Limits Garage, admires 
the first place certificate presented by Joe Ward, Jr., unit supervisor, North 
garages as personnel witness presentation made possible by their teamwork. 



m 




■ 




^■1 


S^^BS 


1 






sy % 


f JK^'^S 


"i 


■■^^f* 





James Ward (left), maintenance day foreman at Forest Glert Garage, also accepts first 
place ZAP certificate on behalf of maintenance personnel from Unit Supervisor Joe Ward 

as workers look on. 




1983 Vol.36— NOS.5&6 



Lakers, Outlaws take honors for eager season 




Limits Lakers' Wade Jones looks with pride at the trophy for Most Valuable Player which he 
earned for 1982-83. Sharing the moment with Jones are Will Williams, left, coordinator, and 
Charlie Hall, secretary-treasurer, Division 241, ATU. (PHOTOS by Charlie Patton, Limits 
Garage) 




Mrs. Gregory Groom was on hand to witness husband Greg of the Limits Lakers honored 
with Best Sportsmanship of the Year trophy. 




Championship trophies for their respective leagues are displayed by Limits Laker 
coach Alexander Miller (left) of the National League, and Outlaws coach Arthur Hubbard 
of the American League. 



Limits Lakers and the general office 
Outlaws garnered first-place honors in 
the National and American Leagues 
respectively as the 1982-83 CTA in- 
tramural basketball season climaxed 
with its annual awards banquet April 9 
at the Americana Hotel. 

Lakers coach Alexander Miller and 
Outlaws mentor Arthur Hubbard ac- 
cepted championship trophies for their 
teams as Secretary-Treasurer Charlie 
Hall, Division 241, Amalgamated 
Transit Union, and President Elwood 
Flowers, Division 308, ATU, pre- 
sented 76 of the coveted statuettes to 
honorees. 

Coach Billy Stanback of North 
Avenue accepted the second-place 
National League Division team trophy 
for his cagers, while 77th Street, under 
coach Geoffrey Henderson, took sec- 
ond-place division team honors in the 
American League. Second and third- 
place league team trophies went to the 
Outlaws, and 77th Street, respectively. 

Albert Know, 69th Street, received 
awards as the overall high point scorer 
as well as high point scorer in a single 
game. Honored with a trophy for his 
accomplishments as overall high point 
scorer in the playoff games and in a 
single playoff game was Michael 
Ewing of the Outlaws. 

The coveted Best Sportsmanship of 
the Year trophy went to the Lakers' 
Gregory Groom while teammate Wade 
Jones garnered the championship 
game MVP Award. Congeniality 
awards went to coach Willie Done, 
Northside "L," and coach Will 
Williams, Westside "L." Special awards 
also went to Larry McNeil, Arliss 
Jones, Will Williams, and Division 241. 

Earning 1982-83 League Cham- 
pionship Individual Ring Awards, as 
well as First Place National League 
Division Individual trophies, were: 
Donell Shuford, Joseph Johnson, 
Giles Liddell, James Barlow, Larry 
Coffer, Dewey Harper, Arthur Davis, 
Marvin Jefferson, Eugene Tate, 
Tyrone Brown, Anthony Coleman, 
Rick J. Davis, Gregory Groom, Wade 
Jones, and Robert Henley. 

First-place and second-place 
American League Division Individual 
trophies were received by; Daniel 
Cox, Walter Frye, Charles Rowe, 
Reginald Spears, Tavel Rolston, Kent 
Thomas, Michael Ewing, Morris 
Bond, Daryl Lampkins, Joe Milbrook, 
John Harvey, and Phillip Ross. 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Public Safety 

Public Safety Awards for the first 
quarter of 1983 were presented to 
North Avenue Garage and Congress 
Terminal. 

It was the 10th PSA for North Ave- 
nue whose previous award was 
earned in the second quarter of 1979. 
The north side garage won its first 
quarter 1983 PSA with a traffic rate of 
4.42 accidents per 100,000 miles dur- 
ing the quarter, an eight per cent im- 
provement over the entire bus system 
rate of 4.82. 

North Avenue experienced a pas- 
senger rate of 0.83. In other words, 
the garage was involved in less than 
one accident for every 100,000 miles 
of operation. This rate was 16 per cent 
better than the system rate of 0.99. 
North Avenue Garage experienced 21 
accident-free days in the first quarter 
of 1983. 

In a more exemplary fashion, Con- 
gress Terminal realized the unprece- 
dented achievement of zero accidents 
for the entire quarter, thus continuing 
its long history of safety excellence. 
Congress enjoyed 120 accident-free 
days in the new quarter. It was the 
23rd PSA for the terminal whose pre- 
vious award was earned in the fourth 
quarter of 1981. 



WE'RE MOVING! 



52nd Street Garage 

Federal Credit Union 

has moved to 

319-329 East 61st Street 

Third Floor ^ 
Chicago, Illinois 60637 

New Phone: 324-5919 

Office hours: 

10 am to 3:30 pm 

Monday, Thursday, and Friday 

Please note: 

You must present your, 

CTA Employee Identification Card 

to enter our new office! 




Michael Veltri, superintendent, Congress Terminal, accepts the Interstation Safety Plaque 
from Safety Manager Tom Boyle (right). Others on hand for the presentation are Teddy 
Kaczmarski (left), a motorman honored with the Outstanding Employee Award; Carl White, 
assistant superintendent. Near North, and Cora Davis, rail conductor also honored with the 
Outstanding Employee Award. 




Personnel at North Avenue Garage also received interstation safety recognition as a plaque is 
presented by Safety Manager Tom Boyle (right) to David Hinman, superintendent. North 
Avenue. Others are (from left) Billy McKnight, bus instructor; William Parnum assistant super- 
intendent. Near North; Jessee Byrd, bus instructor; Donald McKinney, bus instructor, and 
Salvador Perce, assistant superintendent, Near North. 



1983 Vol.36— Nos. 5 &6 



21 



CTA Retirees announce plans for annual picnic 





^■^Bi^^^^^H ^ 



Recently elected officers of the CTA Senior Citizens Retirement Organization are (from left) 
Jack Kalka, secretary; Ben Sctiolz, CTA retiree representative; Clarence Lind, president; 
Harold Burda, assistant secretary and Bill Klecka, assistant treasurer. Not pictured are Pete 
Dowdall, treasurer, and Joe Nolan, general manager The organization now numbers 1,700 
members. For activities information, telephone 283-0486. 



Winter now is officially over. Here's 
why: 

The CTA Senior Citizens Retire- 
ment Organization has announced 
that it's annual picnic for retirees, tran- 
sit employees, families and friends will 
be held August 6 in the National Grove 
No. 2 Forest Preserve, two blocks west 
of Desplaines avenue at 2900 South in 
North Riverside. 

Jack Kalka is the picnic's chairman; 
Harold Burda is the co-chairman; 
Clarence Lind and Pete Dowdall com- 
plete the committee. 

Burda said the committee is gather- 
ing an array of prizes to attract the fan- 
cies of young and old. Frankie Jay and 
his orchestra will provide the music for 
dancing and listening pleasure. The 
committee will also have prizes for all 
attending grandchildren. 

Hot dogs will be sold at the event 
and free beverages will be available. 
Families are encouraged to bring their 
own picnic lunches. The festivities will 
start about noon and continue until 
dusk. 

For further information, telephone 
Jack Kalka at 484-6610 or Harold 
Burda at 788-1022. 



Service anniversaries 25 Years 
in May 

^^40 Years^^ 



James Lemond, 

Fac Engr, & Maint. 



35 Yearsi 



Sol Battle. 52nd Street 

Paul Frank, Jefferson Park 

Anthony Grimaldi, South Shops 

Seymour Hoffman, North Park 

Vernon Kee, Fac. Engr & Maint. 

Edward Kuberski, Utility 

George Mathews, Archer 

Francis Mulree, Fac Engr & Maint. 

William Speer, Limits 

George Thurman, North Avenue 



30 \fearsl 



Spencer Bennett, 77th Street 
Guy Brown Jr., Ashland Terminal 
Simmons Gibson, Materials Management 
Leon Hegwood, Fac Engr. & Maint. 
Michael Loran, North Avenue 
John Norman, South Shops 
Arthur Turner, Douglas/Congress 



Harvey Becker, North Avenue 
James Hall, Beverly 
Lee Oak, Bus Instruction 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
James Semek, Archer 
Roy Shores, 77th Street 
Mitchell Thomas, Rail Instruction 



Service anniversaries 
in June 

^^40 Years^^ 

John O'Connor, 

Central Counting 




Michael Vltale, 

Claims Management 



35 Yearsl 



Theodore Basgall, Forest Glen 
Ronald Blair, South Shops 
Bernard KoniarskI, North Park 
Casimir Kotara, Fac. Engr. & Maint. 
Joseph Lasinski, Bus Instruction 
Patrick Owens, 77th Street 



30 \fears[ 



George Butler, 77th Street 
James Carter Jr., 77th Street 
Daniel Daley, Central Bus Dist. 
James Parr, 69th Street 
Joseph Glngras, Systems Develpt. 
Irving Henderson, Beverly 
James Henderson, Far North 
A. D. Merrick, North Avenue 
Jerry West Jr., South Section 



25 \fearsi 



Bill Baxa, Public Affairs 
Clamle Herman, 77th Street 
William Holliday. Wilson 
Charles Marble, Claims Mgmt. 
Cleophus McGee, 77th Street 
Jerome Ryan, Forest Glen 
Herbert Slack, North Avenue 



22 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NEW PENSIONERS 



i3sr iwfl:E3S/fl:oi^i.A.iwfl: 



SAMMIE ANDERSON, Instructor, 

77th Street, Emp. 4-10-51 
RONALD BLAIR, Bus & Truck Mech,, 

South Shops. Emp. 5-25-48 
JOSEPH CONNORS, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-25-46 
JOHN DANIELS, Care Repairman, 

Rail Maintenance, Emp. 9-18-51 
•RUBY HITCHOCK, Equip. Tech. 1, 

Equip. Engr. & Maint.. Emp. 5-2-77 
HERMAN IZZO, Car Repairman, 

Rail Maintenance, Emp. 10-2-46 
JOHN KEANE, Bus & Truck Mech., 

South Shops, Emp. 2-23-53 
LEON MINOR, Collector, 

77th Street, Emps. 4-14-53 
IKE RIVERS, Mail Clerk, 

Adm. Services, Emp. 4-17-53 

SPENCER BENNETT, Garage Frmn. A, 

77th Street, Emp. 5-21-53 
GUY BROWN Jr., Switchman, 

61st Street, Emp. 5-26-53 
HORACE BROWNING, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 11-5-52 
EARL BURKETT. Superintendent, 

North Park, Emp. 10-11-51 
JOHN COOK, Car Servicer 

Racine Terminal. Emp. 6-25-51 
FRANCIS FARRELLY, Box Puller. 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-10-53 
LEON HEGWOOD, Rail Janitor, 

Madison & Wabash, Emp. 5-26-53 
ANDREW HODOWANIC, Toolmaker, 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 3-17-50 
FLORENCE KLOSOWSKI, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 1-27-71 
ELWOOD LATHAM, Rail Janitor, 

Madison & Wabash, Emp. 11-30-65 
STANLEY SKOWRONSKI, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 8-28-61 
ANTONIO TENNELLE, Supervisor, 

District A, Emp. 2-10-48 
WILLIE THOMAS, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 3-12-53 
CECIL WYRE, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 12-19-60 

Disability Retiree 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, Transit Tech. I, 
Operations Planning, Emp. 3-17-69 



The following names were omitted from ttie 
"In Memohum" list in \Jol. 36, l^o. 1 & 2. We 
apologize for any inconvenience that may 
have been caused by this error 

EDWIN ANDERSON, 83, Shops & Equip., 

Emp, 10-11-19, Died 12-6-82 
WILLIAM BASS, 71. South Shops. 

Emp. 8-27-41, Died 12-27-82 
JAMES BORNER, 76, Keeler, 

Emp. 9-7-43, Died 12-27-82 
HENRY BROADWELL, 72, North Section, 

Emp. 10-15-41, Died 12-25-82 
JOHN CAVANAGH. 84, Desplaines, 

Emp. 7-9-25, Died 12-17-82 
SAM DeSALVO, 67, Schedule/Traffic, 

Emp, 12-30-29, Died 12-6-82 
MORRIS DUKE, 71, Shops & Equip., 

Emp 3-17-53, Died 12-14-82 
EVALD ERICKSON, 82, 77th Street, 

Emp. 9-1-42, Died 12-28-82 
RAYMOND FELTZ, 66, 69th Street, 

Emp. 4-29-41, Died 12-6-82 
FRED GIESE, 98. Limits. 

Emp. 4-18-15. Died 12-15-82 
LEONARD HEILBRONNER. 61, 

South Section, 

Emp. 8-1-52, Died 12-28-82 
PETER HENRY, 82, 77th Street, 

Emp. 8-16-26, Died 12-17-82 
JOHN LARKIN, 75, Specifications, 

Emp 11-23-48, Died 12-22-82 
MICHAEL LAVIN, 80, Transportation. 

Emp. 7-26-27. Died 12-19-82 
THOMAS PETERSEN. 75. Forest Glen. 

Emp 9-28-36. Died 12-27-82 
STEPHEN POLNIASZEK. 73. Forest Glen, 

Emp. 3-20-43, Died 12-2-82 
AARON PRUITT, 60, North Avenue, 

Emp. 11-16-61, Died 12-25-82 
JOSEPH REDA, 79, Skokie Shop, 

Emp. 12-1-68, Died 12-7-82 
JOSEPH SMOK, 62, Archer, 

Emp. 11-28-45, Died 11-3-82 
FRANK STRUCK, 81, North Section, 

Emp 4-16-25, Died 12-6-82 
DANIEL SULLIVAN, 74, Claims, 

Emp. 4-24-43. Died 12-4-82 
MICHAEL SULLIVAN. 84. 77th Street, 

Emp. 9-10-23. Died 12-30-82 
JOHN TUREK, 67, North Avenue, 

Emp. 8-8-45, Died 12-9-82 



Golden Anniversary 

M/-. and t^rs. Peter G. Zacharias of Phoenix, 
Arz. observed their golden vtedding anniver- 
sary on April 26. Celebrating the occasion 
with them was their daughter and her family, 
Dr. and Mrs. Gerhard Bach, and their five 
sons visiting from West Germany. Zacharias 
retired as B District supervisor. Archer 
Garage after 37 years of OTA service. They 
have resided in Phoenix for three years. 




•Retroactive to 4-1-83 
1983 Vol.36— Nos. 5&6 



PETER ALBAMONTE. 77. Howard, 

Emp 2-19-42, Died 4-11-83 
GEORGE W, AUSTIN. 73. Kedzie, 

Emp, 2-14-46, Died 4-10-83 
ALVIN L BELL, 71, South Section, 

Emp. 8-25-45, Died 4-29-83 
JOHN W BRUCKER, 74, North Section, 

Emp 1-27-42, Died 4-23-83 
JOHN CARNEY, 83, Beverly, 

Emp 5-25-26, Died 4-19-83 
JOHN CURRAN. 75. 52nd Street, 

Emp. 2-24-41. Died 4-25-83 
RALPH E DANIELSON. 80. Shops & Equip., 

Emp, 5-16-17, Died 4-4-83 
JOHN DONOHUE, 76, Skokie Shops. 

Emp. 5-6-42. Died 4-22-83 
HAROLD W. FINLEY, 79, Shops & Equip,, 

Emp, 9-17-46, Died 3-19-83 
EDWARD J, FITZGERALD, 72, South Shops, 

Emp. 3-4-42, Died 4-28-83 
ZITA J GYURICZA, 68, Fin Ser /Oper., 

Emp, 8-8-56, Died 4-28-83 
BERNARD H HARKIN, 88, Desplaines, 

Emp 10-2-26, Died 4-8-83 
JOHN J HOFFMAN, 64, Schedules, 

Emp 6-15-59, Died 4-16-83 
PHILLIP HUBER, 81, Forest Glen, 

Emp 2-10-26, Died 4-17-83 
RAYMOND C JANKOWSKI, 72. Archer, 

Emp 10-18-33, Died 4-24-83 
GEORGE T KELLY, 75, Transportation. 

Emp 2-5-25, Died 4-12-83 
THOMAS J KELLY, 79, Limits. 

Emp, 11-11-36, Died 4-9-83 
CHARLES KETUROSKEY. 78, North Park, 

Emp, 4-3-47, Died 4-4-83 
FRANK A KOUBA, 67, Limits, 

Emp, 8-5-41, Died 4-11-83 
CHARLES LAUGHLIN, 59. North Park. 

Emp, 8-29-57, Died 2-25-83 
JAMES M LUNDY, 75. 69th Street. 

Emp 6-10-42, Died 4-10-83 
EDWARD F LYNCH, 74, Kedzie. 

Emp. 2-3-43, Died 4-18-83 
RALPH MacDONALD, 62, Skokie Shop. 

Emp. 5-13-57, Died 4-18-83 
CARL G MANTHEY, 77, Engineering. 

Emp. 4-20-23, Died 3-30-83 
JAMES H. McMENIMIN, 72, North Park, 

Emp 1-30-54, Died 4-19-83 
JAMES H MURRAY, 87, 69th Street, 

Emp 6-9-43, Died 4-10-83 
WILLIAM T NAGEL, 83, West Section, 

Emp 11-14-29, Died 4-7-83 
CARL L NELSON, 80, Lawndale, 

Emp, 4-3-28, Died 4-7-83 
WALLACE L. NELSON, 64, Plant Maint , 

Emp 4-1-43, Died 4-11-83 
JERRY PROCHASKA, 74, Lawndale. 

Emp 10-29-29, Died 4-14-83 
JOSEPH E SCHIEVE. 85, Beverly, 

Emp 1-19-21, Died 4-27-83 
ANDREW W SEGAR, 64, North Avenue, 

Emp 9-12-57, Died 2-26-83 
EDMOND T SEVERSON, 84, North Section, 

Emp 7-31-24, Died 4-4-83 
ROBERT SMITH, 37, North Section, 

Emp 4-13-73, Died 4-27-83 
WILLIE L SNODGRASS, 75, North Park, 

Emp 8-29-37, Died 4-15-83 
WILLIAM F WALDMANN, 85, South Shops, 

Emp. 6-11-37, Died 4-1-83 
ELRATE WOOLFOLK, 65, 77th Street. 

Emp. 11-9-78, Died 4-23-83 

23 



eta EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

(Formerly Employee Cour,!eling Progron,) 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 



• ALCOHOLISM 

• DRUGS 

• FINANCIAL 



"Goal" 
Keep people working 



^222-6114 
222-6115^ 



• LEGAL 

• MARITAL 

• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 



CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 



SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O. Box . 



City, state, and Zip Code 



Mall to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merchandise Mart, Chicago, IL 60654. 



To Inuira Ihal you contlnut lo rxalvt your Trinsll NgwB without drass Notice at least one (1) monlli prior to moving or AS SOON 

mlaalng an laaua, plaaa* fill out your Subscriber Change ol Ad- AS YOU KNOW YOUR NEW ADDRESS. 



RELOCATION! 

Effective May 31, 1983, the 

CTA Unit of Travelers' 

Group Insurance will be 

relocated to the following 

address: 

The Travelers Insurance 

Company 

P.O. Box 3024 

100 Park Street 

Naperville, Illinois 60566 

Telephone: (312) 369-8830 

There is no change in the loca- 
tion of Travelers' Dental Group. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Numbers 5 & 6 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division, Michael 
N. Horowitz, Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment. Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 
Contributing Writers: Ted Radakovic, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, J5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza P.O. Box 3555. Chicago. I|. 
linois 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



DOCUMJi-NTS LIBRARIAN TN 

G'-...t. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 




mTk^.i% 



,1 



Oc 



E^p^^^ 1983 Volume 36-Nunnber 7 

=m€m Transit News 




An $18-million face lift is planned for ttiis world-famous 20-foot tiigh double band of elevated structure whicfi circles Ctiicago's central business district 
above Wabasti Avenue and Lake, Wells, and Van Buren Streets. Work on the twio-mile'L structure, slated to begin in October, will be done by CTA iron 
workers under ttie direction of CTA's Facilities Engineering and Maintenance Department. 



Keeping the 
Loop 'L' alive 




CTA's Loop 'L' structure — a double band of elevated rails 
encompassing much of Chicago's downtown business 
district— is about to undergo a three year, $18 million 
rehabilitation program that will add another 40 years to its 
existence. 

This world famous 20-foot-high steel structure, measuring 
nine blocks long over Wabash Avenue and Wells Street, and 
five blocks long over Lake and Van Buren Streets, is as 
synonymous with Chicago as the city's nickname, "Windy 
City." 

Built in 1897, it is of similar vintage and construction as 
he Eiffel Tower in Paris which was erected for the World's 
air of 1889. 

To rehabilitate the 11,000— ton Loop 'L', 1,500 tons of 
deteriorating structural steel must be replaced, and work is 
scheduled to begin this October. 

Three engineering firms, commissioned to study the con- 

(Continued on page 2) 




(continued from page 1) 

dition of the Loop 'L' structure, submitted a joint report in 
1981 that recommended major rehabilitation. While there 
never has been a serious structural failure on the Loop 'L'. 
the report expressed concern for its integrity should the 
deterioration continue unchecked. This rejunvenation is 
especially important since the City of Chicago abandoned 
plans to replace the Loop 'L' by building a Franklin Street 
subway, and it will keep the Loop 'L' running well into the 
21st century. 

Rehabilitation of the two-mile-long Loop 'L' structure will 
progress under the direction of CTA's Facilities Engineering 
and Maintenance Department. Dennis Penepacker, senior 
structural engineer and project manager, said that all 
material will be acquired through public bidding and will be 
erected by CTA iron workers. 

"The major part of the rehabilitation work," Penepacker 
said, "will be replacing top flange angles of the track 
stringers and, in some cases, replacing the entire steel track 
stringer. 

"Track stringers are five-foot-high, 50-foot-long, three 
and three-quarter ton steel girders, located directly below 
the timber ties on which the rails are spiked, and running 
parallel to the rails. The track stringers are supported by 
cross girders, and each cross girder rests on at least two steel 
columns that are based on footings under the streets or 
sidewalks." 

A typical flange angle is a 50-foot-long piece of "L" 
shaped steel with a six-inch side and a four-inch side. Each 
track stringer has four flange angles bolted or riveted to it, 
one on each side at the bottom and one on each side at the 
top. The track stringers are riveted or bolted to the support- 
ing cross girders, and the timber ties that support the rails are 
hook bolted to the edges of the top flange angles. 

"Over the years," explained Penepacker, "the timber ties 
and debris in contact with the steel have held moisture in 
contact with the steel structure, causing the flange angles to 
corrode to a point that becomes critical to safety." 

In addition to renewing the track support assemblies 
(stringers, cross girders and columns) rehabilitation work is 
slated for expansion bearings and secondary steel members 
of the structure. 

"All of this work will have to be done mostly under train 
traffic from scaffolding beneath the structure," Penepacker 
said. And above the mass of downtown vehicular traffic, it 
should be noted. 

The Loop structure serves the 24-hour Lake-Dan Ryan 
'L' route operating over Wabash and Lake, the Ravenswood 
route that operates on the Loop's outer tracks from about 6 
a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays and from about 6:45 a.m. to 8 
p.m. on Saturdays, and the Evanston Express using the 
Loop's inner tracks during weekday rush periods. 

Design and construction work on this project is being 
coordinated with other Loop projects through Chris 
Kalogeras, CTA director of Design and Construction, and 
Charles Petzold, chief transit engineer. Chicago Department 
of Public Works. Federal and state governments are funding 
the $18 million project. 

"Structural rehabilitation is not as glamorous as building 
a new rapid transit line," said Penepacker, "but it is less 
expensive and it serves the same purpose." 



From the Chairman 



For the Common Good 

1 would like to express our appreciation to Governor 
Thompson, Senate President Phil Rock, Senate Minor- 
ity Leader Pate Philip, House Speaker Michael 
Madigan, Minority Leader Lee Daniels and their staffs 
for the inclusion of a 75-million-dollar transit subsidy 
in the tax package that they presented in Springfield 
in June. 

Unfortunately, the transit subsidy was not adopted by 
the Illinois Senate after passage by the Illinois House of 
Representatives. Without a subsidy that would make ur- 
gently needed transit operating funds available to us, I 
have instructed CTA staff to prepare an emergency aus- 
terity budget, and I direct all CTA employees to con- 
tinue striving for increased operational and administra- 
tive efficiency, so we may continue to provide CTA 
service until this crisis is resolved. 

Without a state subsidy CTA will be forced to make its 
third round of service cuts and consider fare increases. 
This will greatly curtail the public's ability to travel to 
work, school and places of business. It will also increase 
traffic congestion for those who can afford a car, result- 
ing in increased air pollution that will affect everyone. 

Chicago and downstate Illinois are economically in- 
terdependent, yet there have been no state subsidies for 
this region since 1979. Good mass transit is vital to 
Chicago's economy just as good roads are vital down- 
state. I call upon Governor Thompson and the Illinois 
Senate and House of Representatives to resolve this 
crisis for the good of our entire state. Let us work 
together to make permanent and appropriate state 
funding available to Northeastern Illinois transit. 



:?^2..>^5<i 



Photoscoop! 




Transit Nt'u's spy photographers recently discovered this 
factory prototype of new CTA buses at Washington Gar- 
age, where it was undergoing inspection and testing. In- 
side sources report that the 40-foot, 50-passenger buses 
will feature improved air circulation, using opening win- 
dows and roof vents as an alternative to air condition- 
ing. Delivery to CTA of two hundred similar buses, built 
by Flyer Industries of Winnipeg, Canada, will begin later 
this year, 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Lynn Bretz, 
Skokie clerk is 
1983 SPSA 
recipient 

Lynn Bretz, a Skokie Shops general 
clerk responsible for maintaining and 
updating personnel records for some 
700 rail maintenance employees, is 
CTA's 1983 recipient of the Superior 
Public Service Award. 

Presentation of the coveted plaque 
was made June 30 at the Bismarck 
Hotel Pavilion before a capacity crowd 
of other municipal and public service 
employees and guests including CTA 
officials. 

Mayor Harold Washington, princi- 
pal speaker at the awards luncheon, 
told honorees, employers and other 
guests, "The employees we honor to- 
day are exceptional, but in a very real 
sense they are typical of many out- 
standing people who serve in local 
government and municipal agencies. 
It is largely because of them that Chi- 
cago and the metropolitan area enjoy 
a strength and attraction that are 
unique among the great urban regions 
of our country." 

CTA finalists receiving Superior 
Public Service certificates in recogni- 
tion of their accomplishments were 
Isaac Beal, superintendent. Special 
Services, Washington Garage, and 
Andrew J. Mosley, Records Center 
supervisor. West Shops. 

Mrs. Bretz joined CTA August 2, 
1967, and was assigned to Skokie 
Shops in 1979 where she performs 
clerical duties essential to rail mainte- 
nance operations. Frank Venezia, 
director. Rail Maintenance, who nomi- 
nated Mrs. Bretz for the award, said 
she has substantially reduced the con- 
fusion always associated with record 
keeping and files for the various posi- 
tions and employees at Skokie. 

"In order for rail maintenance to op- 
erate efficiently, all vacant positions 
must be filled as soon as possible," 
said Venezia. "Lynn's improvements 
to the record keeping system has 
resulted in the ability to instantly obtain 
information as to the status of every 
position. The type of information in- 
cludes position status and details of 
each position," he said. 




Lynn Bretz, accepts the coveted SPSA plaque from Public Affairs/Consumer Services 
Manager Michael Horowitz as her husband, Guy, (left), a vacation relief clerk, looks on. Frank 
Venezia, (right), director, rail maintenance, nominated Mrs. Bretz for the award. 




Michael Horowitz, manager. Public Affairs/Consumer Services, (left), presents an SPSA cer- 
tificate of recognition to Isaac Beal, superintendent, Special Service. Present for the occasion 
were his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Beal, and Michael La Velle, director of service. 




Andrew Mosley, Records Center coordinator. West Shops, also shows off his SPSA certificate 
of recognition which was presented by Horowitz. Mosley's daughter, Mrs. Andrea ft Harris, 
and Joseph Benson, director. Information Services, witnessed the presentation. 



Upon receiving the award, Mrs. 
Bretz expressed appreciation for 
CTA's interest in the careers of its 
employees. Among witnesses to the 
presentation were her husband, Guy, 
a vacation relief clerk who has been a 
CTA employee for 10 years; her 
mother, Mrs. Virginia Herrer, also a 
Skokie Shops clerk, and a sister, 
Ms. Alexa Herrer. 

Isaac Beal who has been in charge 



of the door-to-door transportation 
service for CTA riders with severely 
limited mobility, and Mosley, who 
maintains all CTA inactive records at 
West Shops, received recognition in 
the supervisory, and general service 
categories, respectively. Beal was ac- 
companied at the awards luncheon by 
his mother, Mrs. Gertrude Beal, while 
Mosley's daughter, Mrs. Andrea R. 
Harris, was at his side. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 7 



'-" STREET 
STATION 






Bonneville Productions took the 900 block of West Armitage near the CTA rapid transit station back in time to resemble turn-of-the-century 
Greenwich Village, N.Y. Movie makers found real estate in the near north neighborhood most adaptable for the made-for-TV movie. 

CTA behind the scenes in cinema, TV productions 

As producers of cinema and tele- 
vision movies look to Chicago as a 
production center, CTA employees 
continue to play an important part in 
the entertainment medium. 

"The Last Leaf" 

When Bonneville Productions 
revamped the 900 block of West 
Armitage Avenue near the CTA rapid 
transit station to resemble turn-of-the 
century Greenwich Village, N.Y. and 
filmed O. Henry's classic short story, 
"The Last Leaf", it had the assistance 
of 10 CTA workers. 

The June production had the help 
of rail employees Arthur Johnson, 
district superintendent; Darden Fuller, 
assistant district superintendent: Hester 
Guyton, Chester Kidd, Allen Rose, 
and Richard Bretz, North District 
supervisors. 

Other CTA employees assisting as 
cosmetic changes of the area were 
made for the classic were Andrew 
Robinson and Willis Wardlaw, North 
side flagmen: Anna Scott, and 
Lucretia Russell, North side agent 




Julie Chandler, set director for "Last Leaf," confers v/ith Robert Ryan, CTA Public Affairs, 
and Sergeant Jesse Resendez, Chicago Police Department, as production of the film 
version of the classic O. Henry short story gets underway. 



supervisors. 

Adapted for television, "The Last 
Leaf" stars Art Carney, Sidney Penny, 
Jane Kaczmarek, and Hermione 
Baddeley. It is being filmed as an 
Easter parable and will be aired at 



Easter next year. The production will 
be a syndicated television release. 

Carney plays an elderly, widowed 
painter befriended by a young woman 
(Kaczmarek), who is also an artist, and 
her younger sister (Penny). When the 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



young sister becomes gravely ill, she 
declares that when the last leaf falls 
from a vine growing on a wall outside 
her window, she too will die. As with 
most O. Henry works, the ending has 
an ironic twist. 

"Here's Chicago" 

Meanwhile, if you want to impress 
out-of-towners with the city's great- 
ness, treat them to a review of "Here's 
Chicago," an excellent promotional 
multi-media extravaganza now being 
shown at Water Tower Pumping 
Station. 

This original comprehensive multi- 
media entertainment about Chicago 
is located in two uniquely designed 
theaters inside the historic pumping 
station, itself a survivor of the Great 
Chicago Fire. 

The fast-paced, GO-projector, multi- 
screen grand tour of the faces and 
places that give Chicago its own spe- 
cial character is all brought to life by 
the voices of dozens of representatives 
of Chicagoans talking about the city. 
Included among the narrators is Giles 
Liddell, Jr., a bus operator assigned to 
Limits Garage who talks about the 
animals of Lincoln Park Zoo. His nar- 
ration is in sync with visuals of the 
zoo's inhabitants as they appear on the 
screen. 

Liddell, who joined CTA 10 years 
ago, has frequently been the subject of 
commendations from near north 
riders. He has shared his knowledge 
about places of interest along the 
routes he has served with delight. 
Other CTA employees making a con- 
tribution to "Here's Chicago" were 
Doreen Lacriola and Robert Ryan, of 
Public Affairs, and Cleveland Jackson, 
Rail Transportation supervisor. 

"Here's Chicago" is in operation 
through Labor Day from 10 a.m. to 
10:30 p.m. seven days a week. A new 
show starts every half hour, and ad- 
mission is $3.75 for adults and $2.00 
for children 12 years old and under, 
and $2.00 for senior citizens. Special 
group rates are available by calling 
467-7114, or 944-7284. 

Here's Chicago Associates, spon- 
sors of the multi-media extravaganza, 
is providing free transportation back to 
the Loop from the Water Tower 
Pumping Station for adults who pre- 
sent a valid CTA transfer which has 
been stamped by a "Here's Chicago" 
ticket seller to indicate that the rider 




Participants and movers of the best stiow about town, "Here's Chicago," pause for 
the photographer in the lobby of the Water Tower Pumping Station theater where the 
comprehensive multi-media entertainment is being presented. They are (from left), 
Doreen Lacriola, CTA Public Affairs; Operator Giles Liddell, Jr., Limits Garage, a show 
narrator: William Harnett, program chairman; Robert Ryan, CTA Public Affairs: and Ted 
Hearne, executive producer 



paid a regular admission fee to the 
multi-media show. 

When the specially stamped CTA 
transfer is surrendered to a CTA bus 
operator or ticket agent within a four- 
square block area of Michigan Avenue 
and Pearson Street, the return trip to 
the Loop will be at no additional cost 
to the rider. 

"Streets of Fire" 

Thus, CTA has earned credit in 
three motion pictures or television pro- 
ductions in as many months. In April, 
CTA employees had behind-the- 
scenes roles in Universal Studios' pro- 
duction of "Streets of Fire" with 
Michael Pare, Diane Lane, and former 
Chicagoan Amy Madigan, and direct- 
ed by Walter Hill. 

While the city is not identified, 
"Streets" is a story about warring 
neighborhoods much like the action 
from "The Warriors," another film 
directed by Hill. Its setting was in New 
York and concerned itself with a gang 
that fights from the Bronx to Coney 
Island. 

In "Streets" subway cars and "L" 
trains are the only means of transpor- 
tation from one battle zone to the next. 
The set is a four-car train on the 



Ravenswood line bound for a mythical 
city of the future where things are not 
so good. 

CTA motormen, conductors, signal- 
men, electricians, rail service supervi- 
sors and vehicle maintenance person- 
nel helped put it all together. Credit 
goes to vehicle maintenancemen 
Timothy D. Wester, Roy Mitchell, 
Andre Brewster, and Johnnie 
Henderson; towermen Guillermo 
Barrientos and Philip Huggins; electri- 
cians Michael Fitzpatrick, Peter 
Kouchoukos, Nathaniel Glover and 
Alton Flowers, and Edward Kruszyna. 

Others were pool supervisor James 
Colles; signal maintenancemen Arthur 
Lowder; rail service supervisor Sidney 
Edwards; conductor Theresa Edwards; 
motormen Eduardo Martinez, Booker 
Cunningham, and Michael Harris; 
Bernard Fletcher, RT one-man opera- 
tor, Michael LaVelle, director of serv- 
ice; Robert Janz, area superintendent. 
Rail Service; Robert Heinlein, assistant 
superintendent, rail controller, George 
Millonas, manager. Equipment Engi- 
neering and Maintenance; George 
Haenisch. superintendent. Rail Shops; 
Frank Venezia, director. Rail Mainte- 
nance, and Michael Horowitz, mana- 
ger, Public Affairs/Consumer Services. 



7983 Vol. 36- No. 7 



Commendation Corner 



Katie Avery (North Avenue 
garage) was complimented by 
Patricia Tyrrell, of Westchester, 
for her "totally professional be- 
havior" as operator of a No. 17 
Westchester bus. "As I waited 
in the shelter, a man entered 
and rolled a marijuana ciga- 
rette. He started smoking when 
the bus arrived. Within a mile 
the driver simply pulled the bus 
over to the curb and told him to 
leave the bus. He walked to the 
front and told her he was not 
going to move. I cannot over- 
emphasize the dignity of the 
driver She simply held her 
ground with every aspect of 
professionalism. The man final- 
ly did get off." 



James Boyd Jr. (North Park garage) was applauded by 
Laureda Philippe, of Evanston, for the way he operates his 
No. 203 Ridge/Grant bus. "I've been a resident of Evanston 
for the last year, and I've been depending on public trans- 
portation. 1 have never seen a driver so courteous as No. 
5522. He always says something nice when you get on his 
bus. He watches for the senior citizens and the handi- 
capped, and makes sure they are seated before taking off. 
I've seen people try to give him a hard time, but he just ig- 
nores it. He pleases everyone who gets on the bus. 1 think 
he is doing his job well." 

Thomas Teuscher (North Section) was the conductor of 
a Ravenswood train that Mr. and Mrs. Carl Anderson, of 
North Kilbourn Avenue, took one day from the Loop. "We 
couldn't believe our ears. Stops were called out— with the 
names of stores near the stops. All along the line, we heard 
distinctly all the transfer points called, DePaul University, 
etc. We spoke to the young man whose voice we had heard. 
His badge number is 22422, and we told him how much we 
enjoyed all the information he gave out at each stop. Our 
ride back to Kimball was just delightful." 

Neil Hickman (Limits garage) was noticed by Barney 
Berlin, of Glencoe. for his consideration as operator of a 
No. 125 Water Tower Express bus. "He called out all the 
stops, and at Michigan and Ontario, he loudly explained 
that this was the last stop on Michigan Avenue. The next 
stop would be Orleans and Grand. Over the years, I have 
seen many people board the No. 125 bus in error, and he 
was ensuring that they wouldn't go in the wrong direction. 
He is a fine driver and public servant." 

Henry Moore (Lawndale garage) was the operator of a 
No. 12 Roosevelt bus that Kathy Lattuca, of Cicero, took 
one day from Michigan to Menard Avenue. "I seldom take 
the bus, so 1 am unfamiliar with the routes, etc. I would like 




Philip Buscemi (North Section) 
is appreciated by Angela 
McAfee, of Phillips Avenue, for 
the way he handles his duties 
as conductor of an Evanston 
Express train she rides to the 
Loop most afternoons. "He is 
the nicest and most consider- 
ate conductor I have seen in 
a long time. He is very helpful 
to riders when they ask for in- 
formation. He gives people a 
chance to catch the train be- 
fore he closes the doors. The 
thing that I like most is that he 
always smiles, and has a happy 
attitude. I sometimes wonder 
how he does it, having to deal 
with so many different people. 
Thanks for having such a nice 
employee. " 



to say that operator No. 2576 was kind and helpful to me in 
assuring me 1 was on the right bus. He called out all the 
stops, which I think was great. He was also very competent 
and calm when one woman began swearing at him on the 
bus. I think you should be proud to have this man in your 
company." 

Arnold Johnson (West Section) was thanked by Mrs. 
Charles Williams, of East River Road, for his help as con- 
ductor of a Congress/Milwaukee train. "I was on his train 
and had an incident with a drunk passenger. Mr. Johnson 
watched and then approached the passenger and asked in a 
very pleasant and professional manner that he stop annoy- 
ing me. I have been riding CTA for many years, and this is 
the first time 1 have seen one of your employees assist a 
passenger in this way. I appreciate Mr. Johnson's courtesy 
and kindness." 

Wallacene Good (Forest Glen garage) was admired by 
Lynne Drozt, of North Campbell Avenue, for her perfor- 
mance as operator of a No. 56 Milwaukee bus. "She is very 
friendly and courteous, says 'Good morning,' and calls out 
all the stops. It's a pleasure to ride on her bus. This is the 
second time I rode her bus, and I had to take the time to 
write this letter. She deserves a compliment. That's what all 
the riders on the bus say." 

Robert Kremer (North Park garage) won the approval of 
Kathleen Gorman, of West Huron Street, for his handling of 
a No. 11 Lincoln bus. "1 boarded his bus northbound on 
State Street. He was most helpful, and knew his run as well 
as the city transit system. He is cautious, courteous and car- 
ing. He has high regard for the people he transports, mixed 
with pleasantness. This kind of attitude gives out-of-towners 
and myself a good impression of Chicago and of him. 1 wish 
I could thank him personally. He gave my spirits an uplift, 
and I got to my destination on time." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Management Training Graduates 




Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick has named five new supervisory personnel following the graduation of the second 
management and skills orientation class. The new appointees are (from left) Rail/Bus Controllers II Jess Barker, Roy Cam- 
eron, Sterling Martin, Lawrin Riles, and Assistant Superintendent II, Personnel, Al Pierce, Near North Area. The Manage- 
ment and Skills Orientation Program was devised by the Training/Instruction Section staff directed by Elonzo Hill. The train- 
ing coordinator was William Sholdice. 



Thanks— for a job well done 



Aaron Amos, North Avenue 

Addonis Berrios, Forest Glenn 
Booker Bolton, North Avenue 
Clarence Brown, 69th Street 
James Butler, North Park 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Angel Carreras, Forest Glenn 
Wafer Carter, 69th Street 
Joseph Catalano, North Park 
George Chapman, North Avenue 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
David Coreland, Lawndale 
Curtis Cunningham, North Avenue 

Travis Dixon, 77th Street 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Richard Dunbar, 69th Street 

August Elke, Archer 
Eugene Emery, Rail-South 

Raymond Furmanski, North Park 



Alfonso Gonzalez, Forest Glenn 

Olivia Hewitt, 77th Street 
Joe Hunter, 69th Street 

Alfred Jordan, Archer 

Robert Kremer, North Park 

Alfred Lee, Limits 

William Lowery, 77th Street 

Madeleine Lyons, Archer 

Arthur May, 77th Street 
Earnest McElwee, Jr., 

Howard/Kimball 
Raymond McHugh, Forest Glenn 
Charles McKissick, Beverly 
Larry Miller, Lawndale 

Agnes Noone, Rail-West 

Tommy Owens, North Avenue 



Solomon Peterson, Beverly 
Earl Pope, 69th Street 
Andre Prowell, Forest Glenn 

Percy Rounds, 69th Street 

John Smith, 77th Street 

Howard Taylor, North Avenue 
Bobby Teague, Forest Glenn 
Sterling Tharp, Jr., Limits 
Ardina Thomas, Rail-West 
Blanca Torres, Forest Glenn 

Arturo Valdez, North Park 
Paul Vance, Jr., Forest Glenn 
Deborah Virgil, Rail-South 

Melvin Wark, Forest Glenn 
Vontie White, Forest Glenn 
Alfonso Williams, North Park 
Helen Woods, 77th Street 

Victor Zynda, Rail-West 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 7 




Rufus Meeks — 69th Street 

"Finishing in the top 20 is 
something added to what I've 
been doing for 21 years. I've been 
practicing, but now I know that I 
can drive. It's something that I 
reallv enjoy " 







Raymond Graham — North Ave. 

"I've been in every Roadeo since 
1981. but this IS the first time I've 
finished in the Winning Circle 20 
It's a challenge just to go through 
it. but I enjoy II. This is my last 
Roadeo because I'm retiring next 
June 30 after 39 years of service. " 



Laurance Weathersby — 69th 
Street "It's quite an accomplish- 
ment to have a record which 
makes you eligible to participate 
in the Roadeo. You're respected 
by others and you're known 
throughout the garage. I enjoy 
the Roadeo participation." 




David James, Jr. — North 
Avenue "It's a great honor to 
finish in the top 20 with only five 
years of service. Just think of all 
the people with the many years of 
experience I'm just glad that my 
record allows me to participate in 
this event " 



Robert Richardson — North 
Park "/ have been enthusiastic 
about the Roadeo and anxious to 
get into it this year because it is a 
challenge. I'm ready to move on: 
I've been through all the stepping 
stones. " 




Jessie Witherspoon — Beverly 

"Naturally I feel good about rep- 
resenting Beverly in the Winning 
Circle. I was also in the top 20 in 
1981. the first year of the CTA 
Roadeo I certainly would like to 
take it all for my garage this year " 



Joseph Rodenski — Forest Gle 

Joseph Roadeo Joe' Rodensi 
finished third in the preliminat 
with 599 points to top his nint 
place 1982 record. "I like the e> 
citement of the Roadeo and c 
long as I have a clean record 
hope to participate. " 




Willie Johnson— North Avenu 

"Last year I had a friend wh 
finished in the top 20. so I figure' 
I'd get involved this time. I wa 
surprised to find backing up a pai 
of the test since instructors an 
always telling us not to attempt t< 
back up without assistance 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




John Odom — 69th Street 

'Competttion is stronger thar\ 
iuer this \;ear. Its alwai^s tough 
jecause of the excitement, the 
oeople involved, and the time- I 
iiould like to redeem myself for 
ast year's performance in 
Boston " 




James Mayes— 69th Street / 

was hoping I uiould finish at the 
'.op this time, instead I finished 
13th I went a little too far to the 
right and left on the Y backing 
Hoivever, I'm still looking forward 
to the finals. " 



Cesar Lovera — Limits ' I m 

amazed at hoiu the competition 
turned out for me." commented 
this Roadeo newcomer who fin- 
ished 19th with 483 points. "I 
didn '( think I had a chance for the 
top 20 with all those guys who 
had Roadeo experience " 




Michael Matas — Forest Glen 

'This year's Roadeo competition 
was lust as much fun as it was last 
year when / finished in second 
place Even though I'm still mad 
at myself for coming in second. I 
feel more secure about this year's 
competition 




Orlando Santiago— North Park 

"/( giues a little different perspec- 
tive to the fob. Its fun to do 
something different from driving 
on the streets everyday I entered 
the Roadeo because I like to 
drive, and I hod the record to 
qualify me " 




Kenneth Fabian— Forest Glen 

"The Roadeo is sort of like the 
World Series — the best man wins 
as we get to the last moment, and 
everybody else tries again the 
next year. I've participated since 
1981 and the course changes in 
that time have been minimal 




Gerald C. Jackson — 77th "I'm 
pleased because this was my first 
competition and I was the only 
driver from 77th to finish in the 
top 20 I know the other opera- 
tors of 77th street garage are pull- 
ing for me to win because we are 
the biggest garage in the fleet I 
want to win for them 




Eugene Tate— Lawndale Garage 

"The competition is tougher this 
year, but I think that's fine. The 
tougher, the better. I want to win 
because 1 want to see Denver I 
did well in the preliminary, but I 
expect to do much better in the 
finals 




Martin Troglia — Limits "/ hit a 

few cones on the right side as I 
was heading in. and a couple on 
the Y back I forgot a few things 
since last year, but it won't hap- 
pen again because I'd like to win " 
Troglia finished fourth with 551 
points 




Craig Richter — Forest Glen 

"The competition was exciting I 
was nervous, but I used my full 
concentration on the obstacle 
course and I came in seventh in 
the top 20 with 523 points out of 
650 Lasf year / came in 14th in 
the top 20 and sixth in the finals 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 7 




A lean and trim Bob Knudsen, procurement engineer, bikes his 
way to fitness at a local health club. He also shapes up with 
progressive resistance machines and vigorous games of 
racquetball. 



^^^^i^^i^ 



afa 



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secref. 



■Partm, 



ary^ 



erjt 



vvho 



CTA employees 
are joining 
physical fitness 
advocates 

If your idea of exercise is a quick 
sprint to the fridge for a beer and a 
snack during TV commericals, fol- 
lowed by long, deep drags on a ciga- 
rette, here's a word of advice from 
the American Medical Association. 
Forget it. 

The AMA reported an eight-year in- 
vestigation has confirmed that men 
who aren't physically fit appear to be 
greater risks for heart attacks, especial- 
ly if they also smoke and have high 
blood pressure and high levels of 
cholesterol. 

Dr. Ruth K. Peters and her associ- 
ates at the University of Southern 
California studied 2,779 Los Angeles 
county policemen and firemen be- 
tween the ages of 35 and 55. The men 
were judged free from coronary artery 



disease when they volunteered for 
the study. 

The researchers reported that men 
with a low "physical work capacity," 
objectively measured by a stationary 
bicycle exercise test, were at least 
twice as likely to have a heart attack as 
men who were more physically fit. 

The higher risk of heart attacks 
appeared to be limited to sedentary 
men who already were endangered 
because of smoking, higher than aver- 
age cholesterol or blood pressure, or 
combinations of these factors. 

When two or more of these factors 
were present, men with low physical 
work capacity were more than six 
times as likely to suffer heart attacks, 
the medical investigators reported. 

During the eight-year study of the 
2,779 men, 36 suffered heart attacks; 
three-fourths of the vicitms had at least 
two of the significant risk factors pre- 
sent, not including low physical work 
capacity. 

Men who were physically fit and 
had moderate elevation of blood pres- 
sure seemed to be most protected 
against heart attacks, whether or not 



they smoked or had elevated choles- 
terol, or even both, the researchers 
concluded. 

A good example of the researchers' 
conclusion is CTA's Bob Knudsen, 
procurement engineer in the Materials 
Management Department's Procure- 
ment Section. 

"I'm not a calorie counter and I 
smoke," Knudsen said, "But I work 
out three or four times a week for 
about an hour to an hour and a half 
session at a health club." 

He said he entered a fitness pro- 
gram in 1977 following surgery to 
repair the torn cartilage in his right 
knee caused by an accident. 

"I had to take physical therapy and 
do exercises to strengthen the knee, 
and when that was accomplished, I 
continued working out. 

"I guess I'm a 'sweathog' because I 
like to work with lifecycle stationary 
bicycles that make me sweat up to 
three pints in one session. I know I've 
lost that much because I weigh in 
before I start and weigh myself again 
when I've finished. 

"A pint of sweat weights one 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



pound, so, I figure I lose about three 
pints of sweat a session." 

Knudsen said his maintained weight 
is higher that the average for his age 
(32), but he boasts of a fiat stomach, 
he looks trim, and he feels great. 

In addition to the bicycles and pro- 
gressive resistance machines. Knudsen 
enjoys playing vigorous games of 
racquetball. 

Looking trim and feeling great were 
the goals of Priscilla Kamradt, secre- 
tary. Facilities Engineering & Mainte- 
nance Department. 

"When 1 was a college freshman 1 
put on weight by consuming a lot of 
junk food and ice cream. Following 
injuries from a 1970 auto accident 1 
added more weight and I became in- 
active and lethargic even though I had 
been a top athlete in high school," 
Ms. Kamradt said. 

Determined to trim down from a 
size 11 to a size five, Ms. Kamradt suc- 
ceeded in losing weight— she dropped 
down to 90 pounds— but at the ex- 
pense of her overall health. In 1971 
she joined a health club and has been 
in it since then. 

She then studied dietetics and nutri- 
tion, took ballet, gradually regained 
some of the weight she lost, and 
learned to maintain her ideal weight 
through proper diet. 

About two years ago she began do- 
ing aerobic exercises that have not 
only reshaped her figure, but reshaped 
her outlook on life. 

"Aerobics are excellent in reshaping 
the body, improving the participant's 
heart and lungs, but most important, 
aerobics can become a positive way of 
life, can produce a good, healthy 
frame of mind," she proclaimed. "A 
daily aerobic workout gives me a natu- 
ral 'high,' leaves me feeling refreshed 
and replenished. No sedentary life- 
style for me." 

While aerobics appeal to some peo- 
ple, others, including Rick Willis, edi- 
tor of Transit News in the Public 
Affairs/ Consumer Services Depart- 
ment, prefer running. 

"1 got into a fitness program last 
December in a health club where 1 
have worked up to running five miles 
four or five days a week. I also work 
out on the weight machines because 
my original goal was to lose the 
paunch I developed from my desk- 
bound job," Willis said. "A sedentary 
life style tends to sap one's strength 



due to the lack of exercising the 
muscles. 

"There's much debate about the ad- 
vantages and drawbacks of running, 
but it's the one exercise I enjoy the 
most. It leaves me feeling good and 1 
figure if running is wholesome, leaves 
me feeling good, improves my 
physical condition, then why not run? 
1 literally run for my life." 

Fitness, as practiced by William H. 
Nash, Training Center bus instructor, 
is a commitment to be observed every 
waking minute. Keeping one's body 
physically fit is not something one 
elects to do, it is a duty to one's self, 
family, friends, employer, nation and 
religion. That's Nash's philosophy. 



Nash entered intensive Karate train- 
ing in 1952 and later was awarded a 
black belt for his proficiency in each of 
the martial arts. 

in 1970, Nash started teaching 
Karate to youngsters in the Garfield 
park area. Two years later he began 
training in the martial arts of Jujitsu 
and Judo, and began the study of 
Yoga as a form of meditation and 
relaxation. 

In addition, Nash has studied and 
practiced Kung Fu and Tai Chi Chuan. 

To complete his mental and physical 
training, Nash has undertaken studies 
in Positive Mental Attitude for perfec- 
tion of his concentration, coordination 
and relaxation. 




William H. Nash, training center bus instructor, is a master in Aikido, the Japanese art of sell 
defense. The practice of martial arts gives Nash the fitness discipline needed for continued 
good health. 



Nash holds the rank of master in 
Aikido, the Japanese art of self defense, 
and a black belt in Karate, the Korean 
martial art. But that's only part of it. 

He practices his martial art in his 
home for about an hour and 40 min- 
utes, six days a week. He also swims 
two hours a day, five days a week at 
Chicago State University and jogs 
from five to 10 miles one or two days 
a week. 

"My fitness program was born the 
day three muggers robbed me on the 
street 21 years ago. I was helpless, I 
couldn't do anything to protect myself 
and my belongings. One of the mug- 
gers had a baseball bat, another had a 
machete, that's a long-bladed knife. 

"After they robbed me, I vowed that 
would never happen to me again. It 
hasn't. It never will, period." he said 
with determination. 



In the other court is David T Martin. 
Area Superintendent, Central, Trans- 
portation Department. Martin plays 
racquetball. 

"Over the years I decided to play 
racquetball strictly for recreation and 
for the fun of it. I still play it — for fun — 
a couple of times a week I also use the 
progressive resistance machines at the 
club I attend," Martin said. 

These are some examples of keep- 
ing fit. There may be hundreds, even 
thousands of CTA employees in a 
wide variety of fitness programs. 

Before embarking on any physical 
fitness program, its good advice to 
discuss your plans with your physician 
so you can be advised of any limita- 
tions due to your present physical con- 
dition and age. 



1983 Vol. 36- No. 7 



Market-base rate 
is set for U.S. 
savings bonds 



The market-based interest rate for 
Series EE Savings Bonds issued be- 
tween May 1 and October 31, 1983, is 
8.64 percent for their first semiannual 
interest period. Older Series EE and E 
bonds and U.S. Savings Notes will 
also receive this market-based rate for 
six month interest-accrual periods start- 
ing between May 1 and October 31. 

The market-based rate is 85 percent 
of the market rate on Treasury five- 
year securities during the previous six 
months. Series EE Bonds issued since 
November 1, 1982, must be held at 
least five years to qualify for the rate. 
Accrual-type Savings Bonds and 
Notes issued before that date are eligi- 
ble for market-based rates if held and 
earning interest to the first interest- 
accrual period beginning on or after 
November 1, 1987. 



New bonds are 

guaranteed to earn a 

minimum rate of 7.5 

percent per annum, 

compounded 

semiannualli>, if held five 

i>ears or longer. 



The rate for the previous market- 
based period — November 1, 1982, 
through April 30, 1983-was 11.09 
percent, and the average yield for the 
two periods is 9.87 percent. This 
average is part of the market-based 
formula only for eligible bonds issued 
on or before April 30, 1983. The 
average yield will change as each new 
six-month rate is averaged in with 
previous six-month rates earned from 
November 1, 1982 or the issue date 
on the bond, whichever is later. 



"Public reception of the market- 
based interest system has been very 
positive," Treasurer Buchanan said. 
"Sales have increased over compara- 
ble year-earlier figures each month 
since the system went into effect. 
Since January, sales are up nearly 30 
percent, while redemptions have 
dropped by a third. 

"With payroll savings activity — the 
major way bonds are sold — also show- 
ing encouraging upward movement, 
we believe that the market-based in- 
terest system is returning the Bond 
Program to a solid, competitive posi- 
tion among savings instruments," she 
continued. 

The redemption value of a bond 
held five years or longer is determined 
by the Treasury Department by aver- 
aging the market-able five-year rates 
during each semiannual period, multi- 
plying by 85 percent, averaging the 
ten semiannual rates, and compound- 
ing the result semiannually from the 
first period. Bonds receive the semi- 
annual market-based rate for their res- 
pective semiannual interest periods 
beginning on or after each May 1 and 
November 1. As always, bond holders 
can find the current redemption values 
of their bonds using the Tables of Re- 
demption Values provided by the 
Treasury Department to banks and 
other redemption agents. 

New bonds are guaranteed to earn 
a minumum rate of 7.5 percent per 
annum, compounded semiannually, 
if held five years or longer. The 
guaranteed yields on older bonds in 
effect before November 1, 1982, con- 
tinue as a minimum to the end of orig- 
inal or extended maturity periods 
which began before that date. Mini- 
mum guaranteed yields are effective 
only when higher than the market- 
based yield. Interim yields for new 
issues held less than five years range 
from 5.5 percent after one year to 7 'A 
percent after 4V2 years. 

Savings bonds redeemed or reach- 
ing final maturity before being held at 
least five years after November 1, 
1982, are not eligible for market-based 
interest. These bonds earn interest on 
a fixed scale to redemption or final 
maturity, depending on original issue 
date. Series E bonds issued May 1, 
1941 through May 1. 1943 and Series 
H Bonds issued June 1, 1952 through 
September 1, 1953 have reached final 
maturity and no longer earn interest. 



IIT honors CTA 
employee as 
outstanding student 




Robert Gierut, personnel supervi- 
sor. Facilities Maintenance department, 
was among honorees at an Outstand- 
ing Student Awards luncheon for the 
Chicago Chapter. American Society 
for Public Administration. 

Gierut who joined CTA in 1977, 
was chosen as the 1983 "Outstanding 
Public Administration Student" of the 
Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) by 
the IIT Master of Public Administration 
Program faculty. 

Dr. Richard A. Rettig, director of 
the MPA program at IIT, and chairman 
of the Social Sciences department, 
said the faculty based its choice of 
Gierut for the award on his "... supe- 
rior performance in the classroom and 
our knowledge of his CTA responsibili- 
ties." Gierut was one of seven stu- 
dents from Chicago area colleges and 
universities honored at the June 17 
luncheon. 

Gierut attained a 3.76 grade point 
average while earning the MPA de- 
gree He entered the program at IIT 
in 1979 and received his degree last 
December. He earned a bachelors de- 
gree from Lewis University. 

Dr Rettig said IIT offers a Master of 
Public Administration program for full- 
time employees who seek part-time in- 
struction All classes are offered at IlT's 
downtown center, 77 South Wacker 
Drive, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p m. Mon- 
day through Thursday evenings. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



More June graduates 



^^i 




DEAN N. MUSSARI 

Loyola Academy 
Philip G. IVIussari 

West Shops 




PHILIP M. MUSSARI 

Loyola University 

Philip G. Mussari 

West Shops 



Sickle cell cotillion 




Delia Darice Weatherspoon, 18, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Weatherspoon (West Shops), was 
among debutantes for the Sickle Ceil 
Anemia Volunteer Enterprise at 
Chicago's Marriot Hotel April 30. 



SCAVE is an affiliate organization of 
Michael Reese Hospital. Proceeds 
from the black tie optional affair were 
donated to the hospital for the treat- 
ment of sickle cell anemia. 

Miss Weatherspoon is a Michael 
Reese Hospital and Chicago Medical 
Center volunteer. She is also a sports, 
and arts and crafts enthusiast, and a 
member of the Chicago Police Ex- 
plorers, as well as the Hyde Park 
Volleyball Club and Teen's Life Club. 

The Hyde Park Career Academy 
senior was escorted by Harold 
Leonard, Jr., a student at Leo Catho- 
lic High School. Miss Weatherspoon 
was presented by her father, a CTA 
employee for 25 years. 



Certificate of Merit 



Your Health 




Rosemary Yabush and Drew Thomas, 
Evanston Township High School students, 
with their display on the history of rail 
transportation in Chicago and Evanston 
titled, "Riding Out of Town on a Rail. " 

A Certificate of Merit was won by 
Rosemary Yabush, daughter of Don 
Yabush, news media coordinator, for 
her 12-page research paper titled, 
"Riding Out of Town on a Rail," trac- 
ing the development of rail public 
transportation in Chicago and Evan- 
ston. The award was presented March 
19th at the Chicago Metropolitan His- 
tory Fair in Maine Township South 
High School. 

Accompanying her entry was a 
photo display tracing the historical de- 
velopment of railroad, streetcar, and 
rapid transit service. Drew Thomas, a 
fellow Evanston High School junior, 
created a model of a 50-year-old "L" 
car that accompanied the photo dis- 
play and Rosemary's research paper. 




Beware of sun exposure 

Watch that sun 

Heat Stroke is the term for the most 
serious disorder due to exposure to 
environmental or climatic heat, while 
Sun Stroke refers to the same disorder 
when exposure to direct sunlight is the 
main source of environmental heat. 

Symptoms of heat stroke when seen 
early are confusion, rapid pounding 
pulse and hot dry flushed skin. The vic- 
tim may collapse and go into a coma. 

Rapid cooling of the body is urgent. 
Ice water baths or packs with massage 
to promote circulation are effective. 
Cooling should stop when the rectal 
temperature reaches 102 degrees Fahr- 
enheit (38.89 degrees Centigrade) but 
should be reinstated if temperature 
rises again. 

After this first aid measure, expert 
medical care is necessary to manage 
any circulatory disorder and possible 
brain damage effects. 

Ordinary sunburn, on the other 
hand results from overexposure of the 
skin to ultraviolet rays, usually in our 
common effort to achieve the "Tan." 
Symptoms may appear in one to 24 
hours. There may be redness, scaling 
of the skin, pain, swelling and in more 
serious conditions, fever, chills, weak- 
ness and shock. 

Chronic prolonged exposure to sun- 
light has a distinct aging effect on the 
skin. It can also lower our resistance to 
infection by hindering the process of 
the body's immune system. A more 
disturbing consequence of overexpo- 
sure to sun is the increased incidence 
of skin cancer. 

Most cases of severe sunburn are 
unnecessary and are the result of fail- 
ure to adhere to simple precautions. 

The initial summer exposure to 
bright midday sun should be no longer 
than 30 minutes. Exposure to sun 
before 10:00 a.m. or after 4:00 p.m. is 
much less hazardous because the 
sunburn-producing wavelengths usu- 
ally are filtered out. A wide variety of 
sun screen ointments, creams and lo- 
tions which may be used will also help 
protect skin from the sun. 

by Linda C. Lapid, RN 

CTA Medical Section 



7983 Vol. 36- No. 7 



13 



Spencer Bennett 
retires, joins sons 
in new career 



Michael Kilcommons retires 




Spencer Bennett (left) gets a farewell 
handshake and his retirement papers from 
Manager George Millonas. Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance depart- 
ment, during a party honoring Bennett, 
day foreman at 77th Street Garage. 



Spencer Bennett, 52, day foreman 
at 77th Street Garage, retired June 1 
at a party held in his honor after 30 
years in public transit. 

Bennett who had served both CTA 
and its predecessor, the Chicago 
Motor Coach Company, assumed a 
new career upon retirement as he 
joined his sons, Spencer Jr.. and 
Wendell in operating an auto repair 
shop. The elder Bennett builds drag 
racing cars as a hobby. 

Bennett and his wife, Ethel, are also 
the parents of two daughters, Nancy, 
a West Section ticket agent, and 
Sandra. 




On March 31, several Facilities Maintenance employees gathered at West Shops 
to celebrate the April 1 retirement of Trackman Michael Kilcommons. Sharing in 
the festivities were (front row, left to right) Ed Shaw, track foreman; Bob 
Vantreas, section foreman; Kilcommons; Adam Knerr, track foreman; Nathaniel 
Clay, track foreman; and Frank Demonte, section foreman; (back row) Nick 
Boccuzzi, trackman; James Stanford, section foreman, and Dominic Cinquepalmi, 
track foreman. 

Arizona Pensioners 



^^^^^K^^ 


1 ff^^M^^V .^^H^^n^^^HiV ^stu^^^^l^^H^^I^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



CTA pensioners living in Arizona gathered in Phoenix for this "family" portrait sent to say 
hello to friends in Chicago. They are (kneeling, from left) Joe Krzak, Dom Napoleon, James 
McGann, Henry Ziolkowski, and Larry Casey, (standing) Ted Wodarski, Robert Barber, Ed 
Morris, Dan Gorski, John Bednarz, Art Fanstill, George Benshish, Bruce Trutty, August 
Shimkus, and Elmer Bay. 




These men of leisure are also CTA pensioners living in Arizona. They are (seated, from left) 
Ernie Guedel. and Roy Bovvers, (standing) W.G. Woods, Sr, Dan Gorski, Bob Jusinski, Henry 
Ziolkowski, and Ted Wodarski. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Market Research Analyst Olivia Bradley, 
Materials Management Department, was 
CTA's representative at the recent Chicago 
Business Opportunity Fair held at the Pal- 
mer House. The fair, which was of special in- 
terest to Chicago-based businesses, gave 
minority suppliers and purchasing person- 
nel from major buying organizations an 
opportunity to meet and exchange informa- 
tion about mutual buying and selling needs. 
CTA is a member of the Chicago Regional 
Purchasing Council, Inc., which sponsored 
the fair 




Bus Operator Juan E. Paladines, Archer 
Garage, was awarded the Associate of Arts 
degree in Business Administration from 
Loop College where he majored in account- 
ing. Paladines joined CTA July 21, 1975. 




Congratulations to Operator John C. 
Hopkins, 77th Street Garage, and his wife, 
Patricia who became the proud parents of a 
baby girl, Joslyn Patrice, born June 23, 1983. 
The baby weighed seven pounds, six ounces, 
and was 20 inches. 



Service anniversaries 
in July 

35 Years E 

Willie Cooper, Campaign Area 
Frank Fiore, Utility 
Gerard Gullery, Skokie Shop 
Peter Maroncelli, Forest Park 
John Miller, Special Services 
Patrick O'Shca, Power Distribution 
Patrick O'Sullivan, South Shops 
Dennis Rawlings, Jr., 77th Street 

30 Years E 

Jesse Byrd, Bus Instruction 
Andrew Cunningham, Stores 
John Eckel, Data Center 
Thomas Kelly, Buildings & Grounds 
George Leuenberger, Limits 
Michael McCarthy, Safety 
Van Penn, Jr., North Avenue 
Raymond Tieri, Claims 

25 Years = 

Gerald Christensen, West Shops 
Robert Haak, Jefferson Park 
Harry Harris, Utility 
Roy Jackson, Claims 
Theodore Kazanis, Forest Glen 
Meyer Lemel, North Park 
Patrick Meaney, Jefferson Park 
Charles Rule, Jr., 77th Street 
Richard Shonder, Forest Park 
Richard Valloni, Power Distribution 

New Pensioners 



FOTIS BOURAS, Conductor, 

Howard Street. Emp. 7-28-72 
LEON BROWN, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale. Emp- 6-20-55 
ROBERT J FRIESTAD, Bus Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 8-12-46 
•DAVID J. HARTFORD, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 2-2-50 
HURLEY L. HUNTER, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 10-7-52 
•ALLEN JACKSON. JR , Bus Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 11-28-52 
JAMES H JOHNSON, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, 7-24-47 
IRENE S. PASTINSKY, Travel Info Rep., 

Public Affairs/Cons. Serv., 

Emp. 7-19-61 
LAWANDA E. REDDING, Data Ridership 

Clerk, Operations Planning, 

Emp. 11-10-62 
CHRISTOPHER C. REDMOND, Janitor 

Foreman, Madison & Wabash, 

Emp 2-16-61 
HARVEY O. SMITH, Bus Operator, 

North Park, 11-7-57 
•SLYVESTER R TILLMAN. Trackman 11, 

West Shops, Emp. 5-5-55 

'retroactive to 6-1-83 



iisT is/l:eiisj!lo:e^x.a.i^\ 



DORIS BARTHEN, 65, North Section, 

Emp 2-10-37, Died 5-2-83 
ALEXANDER BELL, 81, Archer, 

Emp. 4- 12-23, Died 5-14-83 
EDMOND CALABRESI, 67, North Ave. 

Emp 7-19-46, Died 5-1-83 
JAMES CERVENKA, 67, South Shops, 

Emp. 2-12-36. Died 5-13-83 
GEORGE DIPPLE, 72, Archer, 

Emp 1-13-36, Died 5-6-83 
FRANK DUCZMAN, 72, Beverly, 

Emp. 1-7-49, Died 5-21-83 
LEROY GOSS, 83, Keeler, 

Emp. 5-15-28, Died 5-4-83 
LOUIS HERSH. 89, Lawndale, 

Emp. 10-30-18, Died 5-23-83 
THOMAS HICKEY. 72, North Ave., 

Emp 7-1-42, Died 5-7-83 
JOHN IGOE, 86. West Shops, 

Emp. 10-17-24, Died 4-22-83 
HARRY KELSO. 84, 77th Street. 

Emp. 5-15-15, Died 5-27-83 
JOHN KOSIROG, 86, West Shops, 

Emps. 7-2-35, Died 5-2-83 
IGNATIUS KUTA, 89 West Section" 

Emp. 8-21-45. Died 1-2-83 
CHESTER MALEK, 68, North Ave., 

Emps. 1-5-61, Died 5-21-83 
PETER MADIA, 71, North Ave., 

Emp. 7-3-41, Died 3-6-83 
EDWARD MATTHIAS, 78, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 10-10-24, Died 5-7-83 
HAROLD McGANN, 65, 77th Street, 

Emp. 9-6-47, Died 5-5-83 
JOHN MIHALOVICH, 82, Veh. Maint.. 

Emp. 7-6-27, Died 5-12-83 
MICHAEL MORAN, 75, Veh. Maint.. 

Emp. 6-6-51, Died 5-10-83 
OTTO NORDSTROM, 90. North Park, 

Emp. 11-30-21, Died 4-20-83 
ROBERT NUGENT, 81, West Section, 

Emp- 1-30-29, Died 5-8-83 
WILLIAM PARIZEK, 79, North Ave., 

Emp. 1-27-27, Died 4-20-83 
STANLEY PILARSKl, 88, West Shops, 

Emp. 12-3-18, Died 5-6-83 
RUSSELL PLUMMER, 85. Veh. Maint., 

Emp. 10-3-27, Died 5-21-83 
RAYMOND SCHEID, 69, Veh. Maint., 

Emp. 2-18-42, Died 3-22-83 
MARTIN SIEFRIED, 88, South Shops, 

Emp. 11-17-25, Died 5-26-83 
FRANCIS VAN GEENEN, 68, Truck Chauff. 

Emp. 4-17-41, Died 5-16-83 
ANTHONY WILKES, 85, West Section. 

Emp. 12-19-23, Died 4-22-83 
ROY WISEMILLER, 86, Douglas, 

Emp. 8-6-18, Died 5-14-83 
WILLIAM WITKUS, 62, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 9-11-45, Died 5-11-83 
DAVID YOUNG, 67, 77th Street, 

Emp. 7-12-45, Died 5-12-83 
RALPH ZIMMER. 69. District A, 

Emp. 5-3-46, Died 5-23-83 



1983 Vol. 36-No. 7 



15 











eta EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

IFormerly Employee Counseling Program; 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 


Want to see your 
feature story 






"Goal" 
Keep people working 


or news item 
in Transit News? 






• ALCOHOLISM ><^^7TTN •LEGAL 

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• FINANCIAL \^22-6T15^ •EMOTIONAL 








eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 


Just phone 

Rick Willis, Editor, 

Ext, 3324, Mart 






CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 










CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Number 7 
Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division, Michael 
N. Horovwitz. Group Manager. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
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Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 
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4x(.^^ h^ujCiiH ]l^-7 4cvx..rcj 




^S=i^^ 7983 Volume 36-Nunnbers 8 & 9 

FftCV Transit News 




ROBERT J. SANDERS 









;^«-' "v- » 



Odom retains Roadeo title, looks to Denver 





It is a proud moment for alt as Odom accepts the first place garage winner plaque and certificate of appreciation from Alex Johnson, 
director of transportation personnel (left), and Transportation l\/lanager Harry Reddrick. 

John Odom, CTA's 1982 Bus 
Roadeo finalist, was true to his word, 
"I'll win the competition at Soldier 
Field again," he announced early in 
July as we talked with members of the 
Bus Roadeo Winning Circle 20. 

The 22-year CTA bus operator/or- 
dained minister, along with three other 
Roadeo repeat performers, took the 
top four places in bids to represent 
CTA at the American Public Transit 
Association's International Bus 
Roadeo which is slated for Denver in 
October. 

Just two points short of his 1982 
score, Odom garnered 710 of a max- 
imum 750 points to beat 19 other 
CTA contestants for the top berth in 
the July 30 Soldier Field final. Along 
with a handsome plaque marking his 
success, the victory nets the bus driver 
preacher and his wife, Mary another 
all-expenses paid trip to the APTA 
convention, this time in Colorado's 
"Mile High City." 

Besides a second shot at APTA's 
grand prize of $1,000 and a com- 
memorative plaque, it also is another 
chance for Odom to redeem himself 
for what he believes was an un- 
forgivable mistake which might well 
have cost him the 1982 international 
championship. 

"You finished in fourth place. " William Thompson, superintendent, bus instruction (left). "There is no way I'm going to go 

tells David James. North Avenue Garage, as Thompson introduces James to champion overtime in this year's APTA competi- 

John Odom (right). ^ 



"Didn't t tell you I'd do it again," Roadeo champion John Odom. 69th Street Garage (left), 
appears to say to Martin Troglia, Limits Garage, first runner up in the 1983 competition. 
Ivlel Link, assistant superintendent. Bus Instruction. North (far left), enjoys the banter. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



tion. If I lose it will be in some other 
way, but 1 definitiely will not go over- 
time as I did last year," he repeated. 
Odom's 1982 APTA scores ended up 
in the pile rather than on top of those 
competing in Boston. 

"It's going to be a different ball game 
this year because Denver will be using 
buses with equipment similar to 
Chicago's which means we will have 
power steering. It will be unlike the 
Boston competition," said Odom. 

"I think with the training I've had 
here, and the equipment, I will do 
very well in Denver. I certainly expect 
to do well. I would put CTA's 
operators against bus operators 
anywhere," he said. 

Odom said of the July 30 Soldier 
Field competition, "It was tough, but I 
simply got tougher with myself." The 
1983 finalist's closest competitor was 
Martin Troglia of Limits Garage, win- 
ner of the first CTA Bus Roadeo in 
1981, and CTA's representative in the 
APTA competition held that year in 
Chicago. Troglia was later treated to 
an all-expenses paid trip to Toronto, 
Ontario, Canada. 

Troglia took second place in the 
1983 final with 692 points. As the first 
runner up in this year's competition, 
he received a $500 savings bond and 
a trophy. 

Taking third place honors was 
Michael Matas of Forest Glen who 
scored 687 points. Matas, the 1982 
first runnerup, received a $200 sav- 
ings bond and a trophy. Tying for 
fourth place and prizes of $100 sav- 
ings bonds and trophies were David 
James, North Avenue Garage, and 
eleven Wardlow, the 'happy' bus 
driver of Limits Garage. Wardlow is 
best known for his biblical quotations 
and unforgetable cheery manner, a 
trait which has spanned his more than 
30 years with CTA and earned him 
the title of 'happy' bus driver. 
Although duplicate prizes were award- 
ed, James is the official fourth place 
winner since he edged Wardlow by 13 
seconds on the course. 

A banquet held September 9 at the 
Merchandise Mart M&M Club 
honored all of the members of the 
1983 Winnining Circle 20. Trophies 
and appropriate savings bond awards 
were presented on that occasion to 
Odom and the four runners-up. 



Breakfast with the Ma^^or 




Mayor Harold Washington is seated between CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli (left), and 
Board Member Howard Medley durmg the mayor's informal CTA visit September 15 for a 
get acquainted breakfast. Chairman Cardilli. host for the occasion, and other board 
members accompanied Mayor Washington and members of his staff to the Merchandise 
Mart M&M Club where the cuisine consisted of crenshaw melon, bacon, eggs and hash 
browns. 



From the Chairman 



True measure of success 



On be'half of my fellow ,Board 
members, I congratulate CTA's 
newest champions. Bus Roadeo 
Winner John Odom and Third Rail 
Round-Up Winner Robert Sanders. 
We are once again proud that Mr. 
Odom will represent his fellow CTA 
bus operators at the APTA Interna- 
tional Bus Roadeo in Denver, and 
we wish him good luck and success 
in that endeavor, 

Mr. Sanders has earned the 
singular honor of winning the first 
contest ever held by a rapid transit 
system to test the operating skills and 
job knowledge of rapid transit 
employees. We hope that our Third 
Rail Round-Up will lay the ground- 
work for a similar international 
competition that will demonstrate the 
proficiency of rapid transit 
employees 

I also personally thank all 
employees who contributed their 



time and efforts toward the success 
of the roadeo and round-up by 
entering the competition, serving on 
the respective committees, and act- 
ing as judges or support workers. 

Job-related competitions like bus 
roadeos and rail round-ups can be of 
great service to the transit industry 
and its employees and riders by in- 
spiring employees to strive for perfect 
work records and improve their 
operating techniques during day to 
day operations. But the only true 
measure of the success of any con- 
test at CTA is the improvement in 
service that is experienced by our 
riders. Supervisory personnel must 
apply the principles of performance 
monitoring, instruction, and 
discipline across the board to help all 
operating employees improve the 
level of CTA service provided to our 
riders. 



7983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8& 9 




CTA bus roadeo veterans and newcomers display their awards tor the third year at a post-banquet session. They are (from left) Cesar 
Lovera. Craig Richter. Kenneth Fabian. Robert Richardson. Eugene Tate. Laurance Weathersby. Martin Troglia (second place). John 
Odom (first place). Joe Rodenski. David James (fourth place). Cleven Wardlow (fifth place). l\/tarcellus Williamson. Michael Matas (third 
place). Gerald Jackson. James Mayes. Andrew Gowin, Jessie Witherspoon. Raymond Graham, and Willie Johnson. 




Third Rail Round-Up champion Robert Sanders (left), and Dennis Class. Howard Terminal 
superintendent, show off the new Rail Roadeo Chairman's Cup which debuts at Howard, 
thanks to Sanders. Sharing the momentous occasion are Transportation Manager Harry 
Reddnck and Public Affairs/Consumer Services Manager Michael N. Horowitz. Executive 
Director Bernard J Ford (background) presented the cup. 




Clark Carter, superintendent. 69th Street Garage, and 1983 Bus Roadeo champion John 
Odom accept the Chairman's Cup for the second consecutive year from Executive Direc- 
tor Bernard Ford as James Blaa (left). Ford's special assistant, and Transportation 
Manager Harry Reddnck share the moment. 



Bus, rail roadeo 
winners honored 
at awards banquet 



"1 think we can be a winner in 
Denver this year." declared John 
Odom. the 1983 bus roadeo chann- 
pion, as he accepted the first place cup 
at the September 9 awards banquet. 

The 69th Street bus operator who 
captured the CTA bus roadeo cham- 
pionship trophy for two consecutive 
years, thanked the M&M Club au- 
dience of CTA families, friends and 
co-workers for their support, and said 
confidently. "Things may be a little dif- 
ferent in Denver this year." 

Earlier in the evening the audience 
had witnessed the 22-year CTA 
veteran, a man of the cloth, on video 
tape exhorting fellow bus operators to 
"clean up your records and get in on 
the roadeo. it's a lot of fun." 

Odom will attend the American 
Public Transit Association (APTA) 
convention in the Mile High City 
where he will vie for the international 
championship prize of $1,000. 
Runners-up Martin Troglia. Michael 
Matas. and David James were also 
honored with appropriate trophies and 
savings bonds at the awards banquet. 

A special highlight of the evening, 
however, was the presentation of 
duplicate fourth place honors to 
eleven Wardlow. 'the happy bus 
driver.' 

Wardlow. who Director of Training/ 
Instruction Elonzo Hill called "the best 
goodwill ambassador the CTA has 
had." received a standing ovation as 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Members of the first CTA Roundfiouse 18 pose with their awards following banquet at Merchandise Mart M&M Club honoring bus and 
rail roadeo winners of 1983. They are (from left) Norwood Martin, Joseph T. Vallier. Larry McNeil. Adelbert Cobb, Wilbert Matthews (third 
place), Angelo Salvaggio. John Andrews (second place), Hamp Johnson, Robert Sanders (first place), Cordell Bruns. Donald Seay (fourth 
place), James Hentz, Roman Doubek, and Donald Gray. 



he made his way to the podium to ac- 
cept his award. He was warmly em- 
braced by Hill and others as they 
recalled with fond memory Wardlow's 
distinguished record of more than 30 
years of service. 

Wardlow who actually placed fifth, 
was tied for fourth place on points only 
but edged 13 seconds in time on the 
course by David James. The duplicate 
prize in Wardlow's case was in 
recognition of his "ambassadorship" as 
an employee as much as his roadeo 
accomplishments. 

Turning to the Third Rail Round- 
Up, Hill said, "They said at APTA and 
throughout the industry that it couldn't 
be done, but we did it, and everybody 
is asking us how. Since we don't try to 
re-invent the wheel in the transit in- 
dustry, we are sharing the informa- 
tion." 

As the first place trophy was 
presented to Robert Sanders, of 
Howard Terminal, the Third Rail 
Round-Up champion. Hill noted that 
the most important thing a motorman 
has to do is move the train when it has 
a problem. "Mr. Sanders has proved 
beyond any doubt that it can be 
done," said Hill. "There is no limit to 
what our accomplishments can be 
when we work together," he said of 
the first rail competition. 

Said Sanders, "Thanks to all who 
made this possible. We've had a 
chance to prove that rail employees 
are also the employees you expect us 
to be. We're not just winners tonight, 
but throughout the year." 

Third Rail Round-Up runners-up 
John Andrews, Wilbert Matthews and 
Donald Seay also received ap- 




The executive director has special praise 
for CTA 's "goodwill ambassador, " Cleven 
Wardlow, fifth place 1983 Bus Roadeo 
runner-up, as the veteran 'happy bus 
driver' accepts his award. 

propriate trophies and savings bonds 
for their respective places in the com- 
jaetition. 

Third Rail Round-Up Chairman 
Arthur Hubbard said of the competi- 
tion, "Three years ago. I looked at the 
bus roadeo and said, we can do that 
on the rail. We had no manual, but we 
did it." 

Presenting the individual awards as 
well as the chairman's trophies to the 
winning garage and terminal was Ex- 
ecutive Director Bernard J. Ford who 
told honorees and guests he shared 
the excitement of CTA rail personnel 
on being the first in the transit industry 
to have a rail roadeo. 

Ford also praised the Transportation 
department for its continued success 
with the bus roadeo and lauded Odom 
for his second consecutive CTA cham- 



pionship. Michael Horowitz, CTA 
manager of Public Affairs/Consumer 
Services, said it is hoped that the rail 
competition will also become an 
APTA event. 

As Alex Johnson, director of 
Transportation Personnel noted that 
rail and bus employees are now speak- 
ing the same language in terms of 
competition, William Thompson. 
Superintendent, Bus Instruction, and 
the 1983 roadeo chairman, said the 
competition continues to get tougher. 
Thompson said entries at 69th Street 
Garage alone, home of the 1982-83 
champion, experienced an increase of 
participation of more that 500 per cent 
over last year. 

Harry Reddrick. manager of 
Transportation, said the fact that 
CTA's third annual bus roadeo was 
such an overwhelming success is due 
to the outstanding work of its commit- 
tee. He emphasized that John Odom's 
second consecutive championship not 
only reflects great credit upon the 
veteran bus operator, but is in no small 
measure a credit to bus instructors and 
administrative personnel at 69th Street 
Garage. 

Reddrick said the rail competition 
has long been a CTA dream. He add- 
ed, "This innovative idea which 
moved from inception as 'Casey 
Jones," was scrapped and re-entered 
as the Third Rail Round-Up through 
the input of rail employees, makes this 
competition not only the first of its 
kind, but truly an employee program." 
He also praised the Third Rail Round- 
Up committee not only for an out- 
standing job, but "an enthusiastic ap- 
proach to a task which had no 
previous guidelines." 



7983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8 8.9 



FIRST OF 200 NEW BUSES DELIVERED 




The first of 200 new buses being 
delivered to CTA were inspected in 
August by CTA Chairman Michael A. 
Cardilli. and other members of the 
CTA board. 

The buses costing $126,112 each, 
were purchased from Flyer Industries, 
Ltd., of Winnepeg, Canada. Flyer In- 
dustries submitted the lowest of three 
bids received. Total cost of the 200 
buses of $25,222,400 is shared by the 
Illinois Department of Transportation 
and the Urban Mass Transportation 
Administration. 

The buses are the standard 40-foot 
size with seating capacity for 50 riders. 
Unlike other CTA rolling stock, these 
buses are not equipped with air condi- 
tioning, but have windows which open 
as well as two roof vents for circula- 
tion. The windows are expected to 
provide more comfort for CTA riders. 

Delivery of the complete order of 
200 buses is scheduled for December 
of 1983. 



This standard 40-foot Flyer bus is ready for service witfi a seating capacity lor 50 riders 




CTA Cfiairman Michael Cardilli demonstrates to a corps of newsmen the ease with which 
windows may be opened on the new buses to provide comfort for passengers. Windows 
on the new Flyer Industries bus may be opened from bottom or top. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



'Squaredom' is 
wholesome for 
CTA dancers 

Chicago's 1975 Lake Front Festival 
brought a new interest to the Ardis 
Morris, Sr. family as Ardis. rail 
superintendent at 95th Street Ter- 
minal, and his wife Jean watched 
square dancers in their brightly colored 
raiment, entertain the crowd gathered 
at the old James C. Petrillo Band 
Shell. 

"I think I'd like to try that," said Jean 
as she stood transfixed by what she 
saw and enjoying the musical merri- 
ment. Really feeling like this could be 
her cup of tea, Jean inquired about 
the possibility of becoming a part of 
the group. She was advised to join the 
next 40-week square dance class in 
her Avalon Park neighborhood, which 
she did. 

Morris, who initially showed little in- 
terest, was soon to get involved as 
Jean graduated and joined a square 
dance club. "I picked up the dancing 
with the help of my wife and other 
members of the group," said Morris 
who adds that he never enrolled in the 
40-week square dance class. 

Several weeks after Jean 
graduated, the Morrises were both 
dancing their first engagement at a 
singles square dance convention in 
Memphis. Adding another feather to 
their bright hats, the duo took second 
prize at the fashion show for square 
dancers during that first engagement. 
From that point their success as square 
dancers grew. 

Their square dance enthusiasm has 
taken the Morrises to a host of cities 
north, south, east and west. They 
have participated in this colorful, 
festive folk dancing with people of 
every variety from CTA ticket agents 
to an oil-rich magnate from as far 
away as the independent Arab State of 
Kuwait. 

Recently Morris and his wife attend- 
ed the 33rd national Square Dance 
Convention in Louisville, Ky., where 
Morris says not only was every state 
represented but 13 other countries as 
well. "I enjoy square dancing because 
it is a wholesome recreation, and it 
gives us an opportunity to meet some 
of the most interesting people from 
every walk of life," said Morris. 




Ardis Morris and a small group of family and friends from ttie 28-member Diamond Cir- 
culators show off their dancing duds during a lull at a North Lake f^ini convention. Strik- 
ing this pose for posterity are (from left) Ardis Morris, Sr., president: Rudolph Dillon, 
George Howard, Ardis Morris, Jr., Winona Dillon, Jean Morris. Betty Morris, Virginia 
Howard, and little Timitra Morris. 



On June 4, Ardis and Jean Morris 
were elected president of the 
Metropolitan Chicago Association of 
Square Dancers, an organization of six 
Illinois counties. Previously they 
served as director, and then as second 
vice president in charge of the Chicago 
area convention. 

Explaining how he and Jean were 
both elected president at the same 
time, Morris said square dancing is an 
activity for couples, thus each office is 
held by a couple. At the local level, the 
Morrises have served as President of 
the Diamond Circulators, a club which 
they chartered. 

In 1976, the Diamond Circulators 
attended President Carter's inaugural 
ball as did other square dance clubs. 
This opportunity is one of the square 
dance organization highlights which 
Morris enjoys telling. "Only 16 of our 
72-member club attended, but we 
really enjoyed ourselves," he said. 

Like a teacher bringing facts to light, 
Ardis Morris has extolled the joys of 
square dancing to the conversion of 
many co-workers. Among them are 
son Ardis, Jr., a clerk at Howard 
Street: daughter-in-law, Betty, agent 
instructor; Lawndale Garage 
Superintendent Ray Collello, and 
Training Center Superintendent 
Norman Herron. 

Others introduced to the lively art by 
Morris are William Caston, assistant 
superintendent, 69th Street Garage: 
Mack Porter, superintendent, 77th 
Street Garage, retired; Larry Davis, 
supervisor, 61st Street Terminal; 



Rudolph Dillon, supervisor, Kimball; 
Darden Fuller, district superintendent. 
Rail North: Edna Walker, clerk- 
stenographer. Facilities Engineering 
and Maintenance: John Mitchell, yard 
foreman, 61st Street; Howard 
Coleman, rail supervisor. River Road: 
Johnny Tolson, work train conductor, 
retired: and Robert Redd, supervisor, 
Clark and Lake. 

The art of square dancing is more 
involved than most people would 
think. Edna Walker, an advanced 
level dancer who began dancing in 
1980, said students completing the 
basic 40-week course are able to 
dance at the club level which includes 
about 68 routines. 

An additional 30 routines put the 
dancer in the mainstream while an ad- 
ditional 80 routines beyond this level 
are for the advanced dancer. "After 
this we have four levels of challenge 
dancing," said Walker who added, "A 
good square dancer can dance any 
place and to any caller regardless of 
the routine or the sequence in which a 
dance is called." 

According to Morris, the challenge 
three and four level, which he has ac- 
complished, requires remembering 
between 400 and 500 routines. He 
said the dictionary of square dance 
calls lists between 3.000 and 5,000 
routines. 

"The routines are international," 
said Morris. "No matter in what 
language they may be called, they are 
the same for everyone wherever 
square dancing is done." 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8& 9 



Commendation Corner 



George Raniszewski 
(Forest Glen garage) was 
the operator of a No. 80 Ir- 
ving Park bus that Mary 
Featherston, of Lakewood 
Avenue, began taking 
earlier this year to her job 
on the Northvi/est Side. 
"The past several months I 
have been starting work 
earlier than usual, and it's 
great being able to depend 
on a bus getting to Clark 
and Irving Park (going 
west) somewhere around 
6:12 a.m. I know just when 
to leave the house in order 
to catch it. The driver is 
very polite and knows his 
steady passengers. He 
kind of watches for them 
without delaying the other 
passengers, which I feel is 
admirable. I'm certainly 
glad he's there." 



Franklin Spring (North Park garage) was praised for 
"his polite manner, safe driving techniques and seeming- 
ly genuine concern for his passengers' safety" by Carolyn 
Revis, who works on East Chicago Avenue. "I have been 
a regular pasenger on his No. 145 Marine/Michigan Ex- 
press bus during the early morning hours. On more than 
one occasion I have asked traveling information of this 
driver, and in each instance I have received courteous at- 
tention. I have also watched him efficiently handle his 
vehicle and display a very professional manner toward all 
passengers. He is a pleasant and skillful driver." 

Robert Boldon (North Avenue garage) was com- 
plimented by Mrs. J. Damratowski, of Wellington 
Avenue, for his courtesy as operator of a No. 76 Diversey 
bus. "I had to go to see my doctor. 1 couldn't cross the 
street in a hurry, for I am a semi-cripple. When my hus- 
band motioned to him, Mr. Boldon pulled his bus to the 
corner and waited for us. This was at 9:10 in the morn- 
ing. He was very polite and pleasant. For this alone 1 
would like you to give him all the praise for being such a 
wonderful person. God bless him. We sure appreciate 
people like him." 

Dorothy Bentley (Lawndale garage) was thanked by 
Mike Jarzab, of South Central Park Avenue, for her 
courtesy as operator of a No. 52 Kedzie/California bus. 
"Several of us passengers disembarked from an Archer 
bus. and Kedzie had the green light. This young lady 
driver was perceptive and decent enough to wait for the 
light to change so we could board the bus. 1 was so 
pleasantly surprised that I would feel remiss if I did not 
write this note to you. It only cost a minute, but the good 
feeling lasted for hours. I hope this action becomes a 
positive entry on her work performance record" 




Charlotte Brent (West Sec- 
tion) was admired for her 
honesty as an agent in the 
Dearborn subway by 
Chieko Onoda, who works 
in the West Side Medical 
Center. "/ purchased a 
package of tokens, and in 
my rush to catch the train, 
I ran off without picking 
them up. I determined that 
the money was simply lost. 
On second thought, and 
with the resolve that it was 
probably useless, I called 
your Customer Service 
Department. To my ab- 
solute surprise and 
pleasure, I learned that the 
agent had already con- 
tacted you about the 
tokens I had left behind. I 
was able to pick up the 
tokens that afternoon." 



Roberto Diaz (North Park garage) was congratulated 
by Rose Jordan, of North Lake Shore Drive, for his ex- 
pert handling of a No. 151 Sheridan bus. "I don't recall 
just where it happened, but a small car going north on the 
drive turned in front of the bus to go west. Two men were 
in the car. It was a miracle that the bus driver was able to 
apply his brakes and stop. The car almost hit another car 
which was parked on the side street. From the look on 
the face of the car driver, it seemed he too thought it was 
a miracle there wasn't an accident. Everyone on the bus 
felt our driver had avoided a very serious accident." 

Juanita Clark (Limits garage) was applauded by 
Angela Davis, of Beacon Street, for her professionalism 
as operator of a No. 145 Wilson/Michigan Express bus. 
"She was very articulate, her starting and stopping were 
smooth, but what impressed me the most was how well 
she held her composure while a woman verbally abused 
her on the bus. The woman seemingly tried to stage an 
unreal bus accident with her little girl. Everyone on the 
bus spoke up for the driver because she just wouldn't say 
anything back to this troublemaker. The woman even 
threatened her job. Still the driver held her tongue. 
Bravo!" 

Patricia Cobb (North Park garage) was commended 
for "the wonderful and cheerful assistance" she gave as 
operator of a No. 151 Sheridan bus. George Lott, of 
Briar Place, said, "Not only does this young lady call out 
all the stops in a clear and pleasant tone, but she also 
wishes each departing passenger a 'nice day,' and cau- 
tions the elderly to watch their step. At one stop, two 
elderly women with suitcases boarded the bus. This 
driver secured the vehicle and got up and carried the suit- 
cases on board for the women. As a newcomer to your 
city, I was highly pleased to see such a gallant touch." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Day in CTA 
honors alert 
action, integrity 

A bus supervisor and an Archer 
Garage bus operator whose single ac- 
tion in separate incidents is believed to 
have averted tragedy, were honored 
by CTA management as a Day in CTA 
guests. 

Praised for their immediate 
response to nearly disastrous occur- 
rences were Tom Elerby, bus super- 
visor. District A, and Robert Vandiver 
of Archer Garage At the same time. 
North Avenue Garage bus operator 
Herman Austin received a Day in CTA 
recognition for honor and integrity 
which reflected credit upon the CTA 

An eight-year old southside youth 
was rescued by Elerby when the boy's 
pants leg was caught in the escalator at 
the 95th Street rapid transit terminal. 
Recognizing the danger, Elerby quick- 
ly cut the child's pants to free him from 
the escalator. The youth was unharm- 
ed. The veteran bus supervisor was 
commended by Transportation 
Manager Harry Reddrick for his quick 
response to the situation. 

When fire rippled through the Ar- 
cher Avenue Garage at 3:45 a.m. July 
5 following an explosion, Robert 
Vandiver, a bus operator about to pull 
out, immediately began to extinguish 
the blaze. Vandiver also notified the 
control center and helped to relocate 
buses to safety. Transportation 
Manager Reddrick said Vandiver's 
quick response to the explosion and 
subsequent fire averted a greater 
disaster. 

Meanwhile, North Avenue operator 
Herman Austin who received the ac- 
colades of the Council of International 
Programs at the organization's annual 
dinner July 13, was duly honored by 
CTA management on a Day in CTA. 
Austin had turned in a camera which 
belonged to a member of the Council 
of International Programs. The act 
prompted the organization to fete him 
for his honesty and integrity. 

Reddrick said Austin's action was 
not only a credit to his integrity, but 
reflects credit upon the CTA in its 
finest tradition of good will in pro- 
viding public service. 




Certificates of special recognition were presented to Day in CTA tionorees by Transporta- 
tion t\/lanager Harry Reddricl< (left). The honorees are bus operators Herman Austin, Nortfj 
Avenue Garage, Robert Vandiver, Archer Garage, and bus supervisor Tom Elerby, District 
A. Robert Desvignes (right), administration and performance control section director, 
assisted in making the presentation. 



Thanks for a 
job well done 

Employees who have received 
commendations since the last listing. 

Lenzie Alford, North Avenue 
Margaret Arboleda, Forest Glen 

Barbara Barker, Ashland Terminal 
Carmen Betances, North Park 
Ethel Betts, Archer 
John Brown, 69th Street 
Willie Brown, 69th Street 

Jean Cage, North Park 
John Cameron, Ashland Terminal 
Jose Caraballo, North Park 
Eloise Carter, 77th Street 
Lawrence Carter, 77th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Pauk 
Clyde Coleman, Howard/Kimball 

Lathia Davison, 69th Street 
Joseph DiMartino, Forest Glen 
Wilfred Dupree, North Park 
Robert Duslak, Forest Glen 

Constantino Estrada, Archer 

Paul Frank, Jefferson Park 

Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Odell Granger, Forest Glen 
Ronnie Green, Beverly 

Willie Harrington, District D 
Archie Harris, Forest Glen 
Olivia Hewitt, 77th Street 
Peyton Hightower, 77th Street 
Homer Hill Jr., North Avenue 
Mary Holt, Limits 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 

Davis Jackson, Limits 
Jaime Jiminez, Forest Glen 
Cedric Johnson, North Avenue 
Ray Johnson, 69th Street 
Betty Jones, Limits 



Lee Lampley, 77th Street 
LeBlanc LeDree, Limits 
David Lewis, North Park 
Lenro Lumpkin, 77th Street 

Adolph Marth, Forest Glen 
Kenneth Martin, North Avenue 
James McDonald, Lawndale 
Shelby Mickle, Lawndale 
Nicholas Miller, District D 
Donald Minefee, 69th Street 
Luis Morales, Forest Glen 
Faye Murry, Limits 

Ziyad Nather, North Park 

Florinda Orcasitas, Archer 
Ferdinand Ortiz, North Park 

Perry Patten, Limits 
Joe Pearson, Forest Park 
Ruth Pearson, North Avenue 
Leodis Pittman, District A 
John Planthaber, Forest Glen 
Alvin Polowczyk, Forest Glen 
Peggy Porter, Limits 

Rafael Rivera, North Park 
Miriam Rodriguez, Howard/Kimball 
James Rubio, Archer 
Yakup Sabanoff, North Park 
Sam Shipp, 69th Street 
Melvin Sims, 77th Street 
Louise Smith, West Section 
Willie Smith, Forest Glen 

Wendell Talbert, North Park 
Lynval Thompson, Limits 

eleven Wardlow, Limits 
Leon Washington, 77th Street 
Eddie White, 77th Street 
Fred Williams Jr., Washington 

Jacques Yezeguielian, North Ave 

Nathan Young, Lawndale 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 
Victor Zynda, West Section 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 8 & 9 



CTA's third rail round-up is an industry first 




Third Rail Round-Up Chairman Arthur Hubbard briefs contestants on events of the competition schedule and entertains last-minute questions. 



1 he top 18 participants in the first-of- 
a-kind roadeo for rail employees, 
dubbed Third Rail Round-Up, formed 
CTA's "Roundhouse 18" finalists. The 
contest was launched in July. 

The criteria set for rail employees 
entering this maiden transit industry 
competition required contestants to 
have at least two years of continuous 
service, and to have been qualified as 
a motorman for at least 12 months 
prior to the competition. 

Other qualifying rules for con- 
testants stipulated that employees 
must have worked at least 200 days in 
the 12 months preceeding the round- 
up, and must have worked at least 10 
days as a motorman or switchman in 
the past 12 months. Additionally, con- 
testants must not have had any 
suspensions, chargeable accidents, 
chargeable rider complaints, or 
uniform violations. Employees enter- 
ing the contest could also have had no 
more than two sick entries (not in- 




Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick 
congratulates Robert Sanders of Howard 
Terminal, winner of the 1983 Third Rail 
Round-Up. 



eluding injuries on duty), nor more 
than five minor violations (not more 
than three minor violations for 
switchmen) , 

Arthur C. Hubbard, superinten- 
dent, rail instruction, the 1983 Third 
Rail Round-Up committee chairman, 
said 118 contest applications were 
received from rail employees, of which 
79 were recommended for the written 
test Hubbard said although 58 people 
qualified on the test for the terminal 
level, or phase two of the competition, 
33 employees participated from which 
the finalists were selected. 

The top 18 winners in the competi- 
tion held in the rail system's nine ter- 
minals competed for prizes as well as 
the satisfaction of being among the 
best trainmen. (Roundhouse 18 win- 
ners are on pages 12 and 13.) 

Personnel working with Hubbard for 
the success of this precedent-making 
event were members of the following 
subcommittees: materials and 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Donald Seay, fourth place winner, stands a 
uniform inspection conducted by t^/like Veltri, 
superintendent, Congress Terminal. 

equipment--C. Len Wiksten assisted 
by Frenchie Ellis, Claude Stevens, and 
Walter Hallford; finance and awards-- 
Arliss Jones assisted by Carol 
Bowman and Kelsey King; eligibility 
and criteria--Ardis Morris assisted by 
James McLain and other rail terminal 
superintendents; testing procedures- 
James Zepp assisted by Frank Peppers 
and Bob Julan; publicity--Bill Sholdice 
assisted by Jack Sowchin and Rick 
Willis; volunteer services--Linda 
Grysbeck assisted by Betty Richman 
and Bernie Williams; maintenance 
and transportation coordination- 
Lester Hacker assisted by Moses 
Ashley and George Haenisch; com- 
munications coordinator--James 



Jofin Austin of Washington Garage, checks contestant's berthing of train. 



Washington assisted by Jerry Johnson 
and training coordinator—Barbara 
Colwell assisted by Patricia Mglej. 

Hubbard's advisory committee in- 
cluded Elonzo Hill, Robert Desvignes, 
Paul Kadowaki, and Robert Janz. 

Rail instructors judging the competi- 
tion were Gerry West, Lou Payne, 
Willie Wells, Bernie Williams, Frank 
Peppers, Robert Graham, Joe Nash, 
James Fichter, Calvin McGruder, Mit- 
chell Thomas, Alexander Chacko, 
Henry Hooks, and Lonnie Perry. 

Assistant judges were B'.C. Morris, 
David Curry, Alex Wilson, Nick 
Blaino, Ulysee Coley, Jerry Johnson, 
and Byron Winburn. 

Courtesy/hostesses included 



Marcia Hankins, Dorothy Johnson, 
Diane Caston, and Romayne Brown. 
Assisting them was Joe Milbrook. 

Hubbard said a competition for 
trainmen, similar to CTA's Bus 
Roadeo, "had been under discussion 
for years." 

Harry Reddrick, manager of trans- 
portation, expressed an interest in 
having the Third Rail program 
developed. Executive Director 
Bernard Ford was informed of the pro- 
posal and gave it his backing. 

Hubbard said he would like to see 
"hundreds of trainmen, motormen, 
conductors, towermen and switch- 
men, turn out next year for the second 
annual Third Rail Round-Up. 




James Zepp, assistant superintendent. Rail Instruction, speaks to members of the Round House 18. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8 & 9 




Robert J. Sanders, motor- 
man, Howard terminal I 

learned a lot about trouble- 
shooting a defective train, and 
found It exciting correcting pro- 
blems and racing against the 
clock " 



Wilbert Matthews, motor- 
man. Howard terminal I 

recommend all eligible trainmen 
take part In the next Third Rail 
Round-Up It will make better 
trainmen out of them It has Im- 
proved my proficiency." 



Larry McNeil, switchman, 
Harlem termineil "It was a 

challenge: I enjoy competition I 
especially enjoyed trouble- 
shooting and being timed by 
judges who observed my pro- 
cedures." 



Walter Upshaw, motorman. 
61st Street terminal It is a 

pretty good program. It's about 
time the trainmen got a contest 
like the bus operators' Roadeo 1 
ike competition." 




Rouman Doubek, motor- 
man, Douglas terminal Its 

fun-something different. I liked 
the trouble-shooting, although 
one or two times I felt a little 
nervous, but I'd do It all again 
because as I said. It was fun 



Cordell Bruns. motorman, 
95th Street terminal "The 
Third Rail Round-Up concept Is 
very good Preparing for it 
helped me sharpen my skills 
The written test was tricky; the 
trouble -shooting caused me to 
call upon all my knowledge and 
experience" 



Angelo Salvaggio. motor- 
man, Desplaines termineil 

• "For years people have looked 
down on trainmen Now we 
have finally received 
some recognition I hope all the 
younger men try out again next 
year I may not be around 
because I'm close to 
retirement 



James Hentz, motorman, 
Jefferson Park terminal "I 

think Its great The contest is a 
morale booster We should do 
this every year I'd like to see 
CTA trainmen compete against 
those from NYC, Montreal, and 
Mexico City." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




John Andrews, motorman. 
Howard terminal - "It was a 

learning experience which gave 
all of us an opportunity 
to show our capabilities, and 
it gave all of us incentive to learn 
even more about our jobs as 
trainmen 



Hamp Johnson, motorman, 
Harlem terminal "I liked 
the trouble-shooting most The 
ability to make decisions without 
the control center's assistance 
really lets you see the full scope 
of your capabilities " 



Joseph Valliei. motorman. 
95th Street terminal It 

was very enlightening It kept 
me abreast of my training I en- 
joyed troubleshooting because 
I quickly remembered many of 
the procedures I had learned a 
long time ago 



Keswick Smalling, motor- 
man, Harlem terminal 

"The Round-Up gave me an 
opportunity to see where 1 stand 
in relation to other employees in 
the same job In terms of what it 
means. 1 think one can learn 
plenty bv participating 




Donald Gray, motorman, 
Desplaines termincil The 

Round-Up gave all of us an op 
portunity to show what we 
know and it also showed areas 
n which we might be weak So. 
t gave us a great opportunity to 
mprove ourselves and become 
even better trainmen." 



0^'^"^ 


"^ #*x. ^ 


i 

\ rr — 



John Melus, motorman, 
Howard terminal "The 

Third Rail Round-Up is a good 
idea It's like a refresher course 
I liked the trouble-shooting pan 
the best Although I had three 
or four judges observing me, it 
was downnght enjoyable 




Gary Schneider, motorman, 
Howard terminal The con 

lest was wDrlh-while 1 
sharpened all of our skills I en 
joyed both the written examina 
t]on and the trouble-sh<^>oting 
though there was more pressurt 
in trouble -shooting " 



Donald Seay, switchman, 
towerman, pool clerk, 
Howard terminal The writ 

ten test had technical questirjns 
that were a challenge to me. but 
1 felt pretty good about answer 
ing them Trouble shooting a 
defective train to me was a fix it 
yourself exercise " 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. a & 9 




Wew of present Lower Yard with electric powered third rail system. Concrete incline is in center of phioto. 




Richard Duffield, (left). Lower Yard project manager for Envirodyne. Inc., and Stanley 
Neeka, project manager for CTA Facilities Engineering and f/aintenance, look out over 
the Lower Yard from a CTA 25-ton diesel powered locomotive which is used to maneuver 
freight cars. 




CTA's diesel-powered gantry straddle crane being used to load scrapped 
flatbed truck. 



CTA's 78-year-old Lower Yard at 
313 E. 63rd Street is finally going 
modern -- and dry. 

The 11 -acre rapid transit storage 
yard is operated by the Materials 
Management Department as its No. 
48 storeroom in cooperation with the 
Facilities Engineering and 
Maintenance Department, and the 
Transportation Department. 

It is used for the storage of equip- 
ment, bulk track construction 
materials, and scrap rapid transit rail 
and salvage materials to be sold at bid. 

It also is a shipping and receiving 
freight depot where CTA tracks con- 
nect with the Conrail system. 

The at-grade-level yard has long 
been plagued with periodic flooding in 
summer and winter. This has been a 
concern for employees' safety because 
the yard's rail system has 600 volt 
DC electric powered third rails near 
the ground. 

Over the years the development of 
the Lower Yard has been sporadic and 
piecemeal. Just like Topsy. it "just 
grow'd." 

Now all that will be over. 

A comprehensive plan to finally end 
the yard's flooding, eliminate most of 
the ground level third rails, and bring 
the yard up to modern standards is 
underway as Phase I of a three phase 
development program. Phase I began 
on April 1. and the Lower Yard was 
closed June 12 to work train opera- 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Artist's drawing of Lower Yard as it will look when improvements are completed by 1985. Diesel-powered, wheel-mounted gantry straddle 
crane is in center of rail yard. At lower left are Conrail freight train tracks serving yard. Three-walled structure is for bulk storage of 
ballast material. Up and to right is elevated warm sand tower Circular device is a freight car turn-around. Next to it is the proposed two- 
story warehouse. At far right corner of sketch is incline connecting Lower Yard to Jackson Park 'L' structure. Building next to incline is 
not in Lower Yard. 



tions. Its personnel and equipment 
were assigned to Skokie Shop. 
Materials are temporarily being 
shipped by truck to Skokie Shop to 
permit construction of a new concrete 
incline and critical special track work at 
the Lower Yard. 

When the entire improvement is 
completed in 1985, the Lower Yard 
will serve CTA well into the 21st cen- 
tury. 

The comprehensive plan was 
developed by members of the Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance, 
Materials Management and Transpor- 
tation Departments. Envirodyne 
Engineers Inc., 222 W. Adams St.. is 
consultant on the project. 

Starting from the bottom, the plan 
calls for construction of a modern 
storm water sewage system to keep 
the yard free from floods. When this is 
completed, the grade level of the 
Lower Yard will be raised two and a 
half feet by spreading 60,000 tons of 
rockfill, gravel and crushed limestone. 

In place of the antiquated trackage 
and its third rail system will be a new 
track layout to accommodate today's 
longer freight cars. The new tracks will 
be paralleled by concrete pathways to 
be used by a nearly two-story-high, 
diesel powered, four wheel gantry 
straddle crane equipped with electric 



hoists for efficient loading and 
unloading of heavy, bulky materials. A 
diesel powered 25-ton locomotive will 
be used to move freight cars around 
the yard's new track system. 

A two-story high, 34,000 square 
foot warehouse will contain palleted 
and stacked bulk storage railroad 
hardware, a sawmill, covered loading 
docks, and a yard office complex. 

The new yard will alsp have an 
elevated tank for storage and dispens- 
ing of warm, dry sand for wintertime 
use on outdoor 'L' station platforms, 
stairs and walks, providing safe footing 
for CTA riders. 

Surrounding the 11-acre site will be 
an eight-foot-high chain link fence 
with fire alarm stations, new night 
lighting, and guard checkpoints at en- 
trances and exits. 

The Blinderman Construction Com- 
pany, of Skokie, was the low bidder 
on Phase I on the south portion of the 
yard including replacement of the 
crumbling concrete incline track struc- 
ture from the Lower Yard up to the 
Jackson Park 'L' structure. Blinder- 
man's low bid was $2.3 million. Bids 
are pending on work on the north half 
of the yard and on construction of the 
warehouse. The entire three phase 
project is being funded by federal and 
state governments. 



Lower yard once 
owned by Armour 

The land comprising the Lower 
Yard has been in the "rapid transit 
family" since 1905. when it was sold 
by Jonathan O. and Lolita S. Armour 
to the South Side Elevated Railroad 
Company. Portions of the original 
tract were relinquished to various 
developments such as a playground, 
coal yard, amusement company pro- 
perty, and a motel. 

In 1924 the South Side Elevated 
Railroad Company was consolidated 
by the Illinois General Assembly with 
the Metropolitan West Side Elevated 
Railway and the Northwestern 
Elevated Railroad Company into the 
Chicago Rapid Transit Company. 

Over the years various changes 
were made in the Lower Yard, but no 
comprehensive plan was developed. 
Most of the materials stored there are 
what are termed "long lead" orders 
that may remain for very long periods 
of time before being hauled to a con- 
struction site. 

The creation of the CTA by the Il- 
linois General Assembly in 1945 and 
its coming into operating status in 
1947 included the Lower Yard along 
with the many other properties of the 
Chicago Rapid Transit Company and 
the Chicago Surface lines and, later, 
the Chicago Motor Coach Company. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. a & 9 



15 




CTA*s blood 
donor crusade 



Marjorie Holmes, CTA affirmative ac- 
tion officer, was among CTA 
employees at the Merchandise Mart 
who participated in the fall blood 
donor drive conducted jointly by 
United Blood Services, and the 
American Red Cross. The blood drive, 
held at all CTA work locations, was 
sponsored by CTA management and 
Amalgamated Transit Union Locals 
241 and 308. Employee participation 
assured blood for each individual and 



members of their families for one year. 
As Ms. Holmes begins the donor pro- 
cess (1) a technician takes a blood 
sample to determine the iron level. (2) 
Next, blood pressure and 
temperature, important health in- 
dicators are checked. (3) Cleared as a 
good donor, another technician begins 
the final process of collecting the 
blood. (4) As Ms. Holmes waits, the 
donation is completed in a process 
which takes less than 20 minutes. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Maintenance job 
reassignments told 

Many of the job reassignments 
posted during the first half of 1983 
reflect a strengthening of maintenance 
functions. Ten former bus repairers in 
Equipment Engineering & 
Maintenance were named relief 
foremen in the same area: Thomas 
Moore, Robert King, Michael Smith, 
James Baylor, Armando Aristodemo, 
Ronald Broughton, Darryl Cook, 
Brian Grabowski, Thomas Lopez and 
Kevin Higgins. 

Also promoted to relief foremen 
from within Equipment Engineering & 
Maintenance were Sheldon Webster, 
former 'resident instructor, and 
Michael Dain, former garage instruc- 
tor. Appointed terminal night foremen 
in the same department were Timothy 
Wester, former inspection terminal in- 
structor, and former car repairmen 
Richard Urban and Kevin Finnegan. 

Enrique Gonzalez, former bi-lingual 
travel information representative. 
Consumer Services, has become a bus 
repairer. Kenneth Lacker, former pro- 
duction clerk, is now production con- 
trol coordinator, while Stephen 
Wojnicki, former senior combination 
clerk, has been named combination 
clerk coordinator. 

Selected as escalator servicemen in 
Facilities Engineering & Maintenance 
were James Rigney, former machinist: 
Harvey Heide, former electrician, and 
Walter Brozek, former electrical 
worker, all from within the same 
department. 

Also in Facilities Engineering & 
Maintenance, Robert Gierut, former 
analyst. Labor Relations, has been 
named supervisor, Facilities 
Maintenance Personnel, and Thomas 
Luebker, former electrical engineer, 
Equipment Engineering & 
Maintenance, has become a testing 
engineer. Frank Bocleair and Barry 
Bowles have been promoted from rail 
janitor to rail janitor foreman. 

In Transportation, Andrew Bishop, 
former controller. Control Center, has 
been chosen assistant superintendent. 
Personnel, Near North. Also named 
assistant superintendents. Personnel, 
were William Claiborne, former bus in- 
structor, and former rail instructors 
Ulysee Coley and Byron Winburn. 
Another former bus instructor, Frank 
Jones, has become a controller in the 



Control Center. 

In other Transportation Department 
reassignments, Mary Fields and Elree 
Jones, former conductors, have been 
selected yard foremen, while Aubrey 
Boiling and Ronald Moody, both 
former switchmen, have been named 
work train conductors. 

Carol Griseto, former stenographer, 
has become confidential office assis- 
tant within Materials Management. In 
Financial Services, Rita Deakin has 
moved from accounting technician to 
senior accountant, while Chuchai 
Gosrisirikul and Juanita Gandor, both 
former accountants, have been named 
accounting specialists. 

In Operations Planning, Allan Lee 
has been promoted from traffic plan- 
ning technician to transit technician. 
Planner Paul O'Brien has been 
reassigned from Operations Planning 
to Capital Development. Michael 
Hartman, former project controller, 
Capital Development, has been 
named senior strategic planner. 
Strategic Planning. 

Arthella Brown, confidential office 
assistant, has moved from the Ex- 
ecutive Director's Office to Labor Rela- 
tions. Cynthia Meczynski, former con- 
fidential office assistant. Personnel Ad- 
ministration, has been selected 
forms/records/procedures assistant, 
Management Services. Also in Per- 
sonnel Administration, Robert Reule 
has been reassigned from personnel 
records coordinator to classification & 
compensation specialist. 



COMTO chapter 
names officers 

The recently established Chicago 
chapter. Conference of Minority 
Transportation Officials (COMTO) an- 
nounced its slate of executive commit- 
tee personnel for 1983-84. 

Named as president was Betty B. 
Edwards, Public Affairs/Consumer 
Services. Ernest Sawyer, manager. 
Strategic Planning, was elected vice 
president; Marjorie M. Holmes, CTA's 
Affirmative Action officer, was named 
secretary, and Charles E. Marble, 
superintendent. Claims Administra- 
tion, was named treasurer. 

Executive committee co-chairmen 
are: public relations, Celso 
Castellanos, Engineering, and Rick 
Willis, Public Affairs: membership, 
Paul Kadowaki and Elonzo Hill, 



Transportation, and Elda Leal, Public 
Affairs: program chairman, Milton 
Lamb, RTA: scholarship/education, 
Fred King, Human Resources, and 
Doris Thompson, RTA. 

Other executive committee co- 
chairmen are: constitu- 
tion/nominating committee, Harry 
Reddrick, Transportation, and At- 
torney William Mansker. Anita Curtis, 
manager of Placement, Ruth LeBron 
of Budget and Hal Pollard, Waukegan 
Transit, are committee co-chairmen of 
special projects. 

The Conference of Minority 
Transportation Officials was estab- 
lished in 1971. A national organiza- 
tion, it is designed to create a profes- 
sional network for minorities which will 
provide maximum contact and timely 
communication of employment and 
economic opportunities in public 
transportation for minorities. 

Gonder named to 
accounting committee 




Emmet Gonder, senior budget 
analyst, has been named to the Illinois 
Certified Public Accountant Society's 
governmental accounting committee, 
and the subcommittee on counties and 
special districts. 

Gonder has been a member of the 
society since 1977 when he passed the 
uniform CPA examination. He is a 
1971 graduate of the University of 
Chicago Graduate School of Business 
where he received a master's of 
business administration degree in 
finance. He joined CTA in December 
1978. 

Gonder will write an audit guide for 
special districts with the subcommittee, 
and will review audits of governmental 
entities for quality control. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8 & 9 



17 




A»W»A»R»D»S 



Lawndale sets pace for safety improvements 




The bump hat is in order for Lawndale bus repairer Verdie 
Coleman as he checks out this engine. 



Bus repairer Lonzo Lyies dons safety goggles as well as a bump 
hat as he works on this vehicle. Bump hats, safety goggles and 
the use of other safety equipment has meant an improved safety 
record for Lawndale Garage 



Lawndale Garage's bus main- 
tenance personnel continued to spiral 
towards new heights in the Zero Acci- 
dent Program (ZAP) in June as it took 
first place honors in the second 
quarter. 

Lawndale's most recent first place 
ZAP award came in the fourth quarter 
of 1982. followed by second place in 
the first quarter of 1983. Until it made 
the turn around in the fourth quarter, 
the garage had been a frequent winner 
of the "bottom of the barrel" award for 
the highest injury frequency rate 
among garages 

Day foreman Bill Toomey said the 
new safety emphasis at Lawndale 
came after Executive Director Bernard 
Ford visited the location during one of 



his field trips, Toomey said at that time 
Ford encouraged employees to im- 
prove their safety record. "It was the 
beginning of Lawndale's upward trend 
for improving the safety record," he 
said. 

Toomey said a more conscious ef- 
fort to wear protective equipment has 
also helped improve Lawndale's safety 
record Maintenance personnel at the 
garage have vowed to continue win- 
ning ZAP safety awards. 

Night foreman Anthony Tunious 
said efforts to remind maintenance 
workers of protective equipment have 
been doubled. Tunious said he fre- 
quently encourages workers to wear 
work shoes with non-slip soles as well 
as the blaze orange vests and other 



personal protective equipment for 
safety measures. 

"When management recognized 
Lawndale as a location which needed 
safety improvement, it was just what 
was needed to get its personnel busy," 
said Jim Dudley, supervisor of Safety. 
Equipment Engineering and 
Maintenance. 

Safety became the watch word as 
everybody began working as family for 
a first place ZAP award Garage 
workers were more conscious of bump 
hats, goggles and safety shoes, and 
safety violations were reported with 
regularity as co-workers warned each 
other of hazards and applied caution 

"Bump hats do help avoid a lot of 
trouble when they are worn," said 



CTA rRANSIT NEWS 



repairer Salvatore Alleruzzo, a 16-year 
employee who has been careful not 
to become a statistic. 

John H. Brown, a servicer, said "1 
encourage people to slow down when 
they're driving into the shop, or walk- 
ing through. We don't want any ac- 
cidents due to personnel or equip- 
ment." 

"We work together as a team at this 
garage," said Lonzo Lyies, "We have 
been together a long time and we're 
getting better all the time." 

Bus Garage Superintendent Ray 
Coieilo noted, "We help each other 
out. When our operators see 
something that could be a potential 
hazard for the maintenance shop, we 
let them know about it. and they do 




Ronald Schwichtenberg, bus repairman (left), and John Brown, bus serviceman, show off 
Lawndale Garage's long awaited first place ZAP certificate as Jim Dudley, safely super- 
visor. Equipment Engineering l^aintenance, looks on. 




Lee Slay, car repairman at 98th Terminal, proudly dispays a first place ZAP certificate as co-workers share the honors. Members of the 
group are (from left) James Pankonen. director. Systems Assurance; Gary Kemp, assistant day shop foreman; George Ivlillonas, 
manager, Equipment Engineering Maintenance; Frank Venezia, director. Rail Terminal Maintenance; Stay, Richard Lorimer, superinten- 
dent, West Rail Terminals, Leon Fields, day shop foreman; Dave Artis, car repairman, and James Dudley. Equipment Engineering 
Maintenance supervisor of safety. 

the same for us. This garage is har- 
mony within." 

"The ZAP is back at Lawndale." 
said Toomey, "and we hope to stay." 

Among rail terminals the 54th and 
98th Street terminals took first place 
ZAP awards. At Skokie meanwhile, 
first place certificates in rail shop com- 
petition went to workers in the Paint 
Shop, Armature Room, Shop Ser- 
vice, Machine Shop, Axle Shop, and 
Degreasing area. 

Bus Shop competition winners at 
77th Street were employees of the 
Paint Shop, Blacksmith/Welding, 
Vehicle Wiring, Mechanical, Shop 
Service, Inspection Shop, Machine 
Shop, Radiator Shop, and the Print 
Shop. 




Dom Nicosia. 54th Street Terminal foreman (left), accepts a first place ZAP certificate 
from Frank Venezia. director. Rail Maintenance. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 8& 9 



South Shops 
personnel 
hold picnic 

Recipe for a memorable picnic: 
Take one breezy day in June: add a 
generous helping of fun and laughter; 
sprinkle with cold drinks, hot dogs, 
candy, potato chips and chili; season 
with children's games---volleyball. 
Softball and horse shoe pitching: spice 
with door prizes and free balloons; fold 
in 123 families (including 236 
children); set out in the warm sunshine 
in Rubio Woods Forest Preserve until 
done. 




South Shops Picnic Committee includes (From left. Iront) Jim Jankus. Rene Sakroil. Jett 
Sweda. Rich Morrow. Leon Griffith, and Frank Sprovieri. Back row: Harry Hollendonner 
(left), and Robert Brown. Not pictured are Mike Bay and Jerry Walter 





IL^jlJ^ 




Possible victory slips through the fingers of this entrant in the egg toss contest 



Pie eating contest attracted entrants with im- 
pressive, ahem, credentials. 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Clowns Bob Domikaitis (left), and Ed Milkint spread some picnic joy. 




Contributions to 
pension plan 
explained 




Adults line up eager (?) pint size entrants for the big race. 



June'83 Sept 83 



Employees who have been studying 
their paychecks will have noticed 
deductions beginning in June, 1983, 
reflecting amounts being contributed 
to the Employee Pension Plan. 

It's all part of the agreement reached 
in February, 1982, whereby contribu- 
tions from both employees and the 
Authority were temporarily suspended 
to ease cash flow problems. 

Over the coming year, through 
June, 1984, contributions will 
gradually be restored in a process that 
calls for increases every three months. 

From June through August, 1983, 
for instance, employees were to con- 
tribute the lower of the cost-of-living 
pay adjustment, or one and a half per 
cent, while the Authority was to pro- 
vide six and a half per cent. From 
September through November, the 
employee rate was to rise to the lower 
of the cost-of-living pay adjustment, or 
two and a half per cent, while the 
Authority's participation was to reach 
eight per cent. 

The respective increases for the 
three-month period beginning in 
December will be four and 10 per 
cent; and starting in March, 1984, five 
and 12 per cent. Beginning in June, 
1984, the contributions will reach and 
remain at the level of seven and 13 per 
cent respectively. 

The amount of employee contribu- 
tions made through November 30, 
1984, are not to exceed the cost-of- 
living pay adjustments taking effect 
throughtout this period. 



7983 Vol. 36—Nos. 8 & 9 



21 



Service anniversaries 
in August 

40 Years; 



•^ /^ 




Phil Adelizzi 

Real Estate 




Valeria Bowman 

Pai,Toll Accounting 




Marie Havlik 

Facilities Maintenance 



35 YearsE 



Henry Beaty Jr., 77th Transportation 
Jack Chunowitz, Claims Management 
Cedric Draper, North Park Maintenance 
James Fahey. Rail District North 
Henry Keane. Fac Engr & Maint 
Bernard Kiviehan. Skokie Shop 
Cecil Mimms, Claims Managment 
Alvin Nichols, 77th Transportation 
Dale Peters. North Park 
Donald Ruroede, Skokie Shop 

30 Years= 

Chester Browning, North Park 
Rufus Boyd. Limits 
Will Candy Jr., Lawndale 
Francis Farrclly, North Avenue 



Amos Foster. Central Counting 
Richard Griffith Jr., 69th Street 
Willie Guthrie, Bus Instruction 
James Hickman, fa9th Street 
William Killion, Central Counting 
Mcrritt Kotin. Real Estate 
Tommie Lowery, Signal 
Luzell Mims, District C 
Calvin Oldham. Utility 
Tomie Phillips, Lawndale 
Donald Powell, Stores 
Charles Roberson, Forest Glen 
Marvin Salmanoff, North Park 
Ernest Tonsil, West Section 
Lawrence Tuggle, 77th Street 
Gonzald Vtddez, Archer 

25 Yearsi 

Charles Barnes Jr., 77th Street 
Wilbert Blakely, South Shops 
Jerry Boone, Rail Janitors 
William Chamerlik. West Shops 
Val Church, North Avenue 
Albert Evans, West Shops 
Thurmon Jolly. 69th Street 
Stephen Kinchus, West Shops 
Harvey Kirkpatrick, Bus Instruction 
Ronald Mendyk, Utility 
Roy Mohler Jr., Control Center 
James Pruitt. 77th Street 
Donald Regan, West Shops 
Arthur Tropple, North Park 
Robert Vantrease, West Shops 
Patrick White. West Shops 



Service anniversaries 
in September 



35 Years: 

William McCarthy, 77th Street 
Patrick Nolan, Ashland Terminal 
Thomas Togher, Harlem Maintenance 
Frank Von Schwedler, North Park 
William White. Frest Glen 

30 Ypars ^^ 

Prentis Armstrong. District C 
Thomas Banks. Jr.. 77th Street 
DeLord Hatcher, Equip Engr Maint 
Goldwyn James, 69th Street 
Robert Johnson. Adm Services 
Frederick King, 77th Street 
Leontird Mirabelli, Equip Engr Maint 
Otis Rounds, 77th Street 
Isaac Taylor, Utility 



25 Years 



Grant Greene. Equip Engr 'Maint 
John Hudson Jr., .S2nd Street 
LeBlanc LeDree. Limits 
Bernard Michalski. Fac Engr Maint 
Myroslaiv Nimylowycz. North Avenue 
Russell Schaeffer. Fac Engr Maint 
Benjamin Smith. 77th Street 
Aleksander Wyszynski, Transportation 



New Pensioners 



OWEN BOOTHROYD Jr . Instructor. 

Limits, Emp 12-30-63 
ERNEST CLANTON. Rail Janitor. 

Madison Wells. Emp 3-18-71 
JOSEPH CONNERS. Bus Operator. 

Limits. Emp 1-25-46 
JUNIUS ECHOLS. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 2-6-51 
CHARLES FRASSICO. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 4-25-50 
EDWARD GERTZ, Machinist. 

West Shops. Emp 8-1-49 
ANDREW JONES .Jr . Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 1-23 58 
EUGENE KENNARD. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 2-6-48 
GEORGE LEUENBERGER. Janitor. 

Limits. Emp 7-28-53 
ARVEL MILLS. Box Puller. 

North Avenue. Emp 3-13-61 
JOHN MULLIGAN, Assign Clerk, 

61st Terminal. Emp 1-24-49 
THOMAS ROAN. Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen. Emp 3 13-43 
WALTER RUSCIK. Bus Operator. 

Lawndale. Emp 6-8-49 
ROSCOE SPOONER. Ticket Agent. 

South Section. Emp 3-13 58 
EUGENE SPROVIERI. Serv Trk Chauff . 

West Shops. Emp 1-16-47 
RAYMOND TIERI. Claims Rep . 

Law Claims. Emp 7-23-53 
CLAUDIUS WORLAND. Wit Loc Clk II. 

Law. Emp 8-25-47 

Disability Retirements 

McCARTHER BARNES. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 9-30-68 
ROLLIE DOOLEY. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 7-2-68 
CURTIS EAST. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 5 29-63 
CHARLES GAINES. Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp 5-23-57 
EUGENE JOHNSON. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 9-15-60 
HELEN KRALJ. Ticket Agent. 

West Section. Emp 7-23 69 
BETT>' RICE. Ticket Agent. 

West Section. Emp 1-22 69 
JAMES P SPENCER. Car Servicer. 

Racine. Emp 9-23 68 
RICKY WITT Supervisor. 

Dist D. Emp 517-73 



11^ 1wIE:Is/IOR.I-A.3VI 



ALBERT ANDREWS. 77. Keeler. 

Emp 9 2S50. Died 7 8-83 
JOHN BALLARD. 42. North Park. 

Emp 4^28-80, Died 7 16-83 
FRANK J BECKER, 73. Utility. 

Emp 10 3 42, Died 7-19-83 
EUGENE BERGFELD, 71. North Section. 

Emp 2 23 63. Died 7 9-83 
CARL BISCH. 74. 61sl Street. 

Emp 10 14-47, Died 7-6-83 
JOSEPH BOBKO. 72. South Shops. 

Emp 7-6-48. Died 7 26-83 



22 



CM TRANSIT NEWS 



Bus instructor 
Boothroyd retires 

More than 75 friends and co- 
workers of Owen Boothroyd Jr. at- 
tended a retirement party in his honor 
in the training center on July 1. 
Boothroyd, 63, retired after 20 years 
service. Since 1976 he had been a bus 
driver instructor in the training center. 
Boothroyd received a gift of cash from 
his friends. He and his wife, Anna, 
moved to Florida. 




Owen Boothroyd Jr., (center), receives his retirement gift from Arthur Bennett, bus driver 
instructor Joining the informal presentation is Paul Kadowaiii, area superintendent, in- 
struction, in the training center. 



JOHN BREYTSPRAAK, 63, West Shops. 

Emp 4-1-47, Died 7-22-83 
KENNETH BURNELL, 79, Kedzie, 

Emp. 10-7-31, Died 6-25-83 
JOSEPH DeBENEDETTO, 66, West Section, 

Emp. 2-12-46, Died 7-5-83 
LOUIS DEITCH, 79, General Office, 

Emp. 4-4-31, Died 7-19-83 
JAMES DEVINE, 88, Lawndale, 

Emp 7-20-21, Died 6-13-83 
CHARLES DIVITA, n/a. Various, 

Emp. 8-16-42, Died n/a 
MILTON DRANE, 75, Archer, 

Emp. 12-18-43. Died 7-13-83 
HERBERT ELSNER, 85, Lake Street, 

Emp 12-23-18, Died 6-1-83 
MATTHEW FEILER, 81, North Section, 

Emp. 9-3-42, Died 6-27-83 
FRED GARDNER, 66, Skokie Shop, 

Emp. 3-31-45, Died 7-16-83 
ANDREW GIBSON, 68, Veh. Maint.. 

Emp. 7-24-46, Died 7-21-83 
WILLIAM GLARDON, 94, 77th Street, 

Emp. 8-16-10, Died 7-24-83 
MARTIN GRADY, 69, Beverly, 

Emp. 5-21-34, Died 7-10-83 
CORNELL GRANT Sr., 56, 69th Street, 

Emp. 2-14-66, Died 6-26-83 
ALFRED HALE, 86, North Avenue, 

Emp. 6-12-25, Died 6-3-83 
CLIFFORD HERCHENRODER, 67, S Sect , 

Emp. 9-8-47, Died 7 27 83 
ARTHUR JACKSON, 59, 77th Street, 

Emp. 4-12-48, Died 7-20-83 
GEORGE JOHNSON, 91, Track, 

Emp. 7-1-07, Died 7-5-83 
ARTHUR JOOST, 70, North Section, 

Emp. 2-15-45, Died 7-2-83 
JOHN KEARNS, 87, North Section, 

Emp. 6-1-21, Died 6-28-83 
JAMES LEAMY, 82, South Shops, 

Emp. 10-1-42, Died 7 17 83 
EMMETT J. McCarthy, 80, Archer 

Emp 12-17-27. Died 7-26-83 
HUGH McCAULEY, 66, North Section, 

Emp. 3-20-42, Died 7-30-83 
FREDERICK McCOY, 77, Archer, 

Emp. 10-31-42, Died 6-10-83 
FRED McDOLE, 85, South Section, 

Emp 12-12-23, Died 7 6 83 



PAUL McENANEY, 79, Beverly, 

Emp 1-13-44, Died 6-3-83 
THOMAS McCOURTY, 82, West Section, 

Emp 1-29 31, Died 6-20-83 
JOSEPH MORRISON, 78, Kimball. 

Emp 10-20-47. Died 6-30-83 
OTTO MULLARD, 79, Forest Glen 

Emp 2 28-28, Died 7-20-83 
JAMES NELSON, 83, Devon, 

Emp 7 5-29, Died 7-5-83 
EDWARD O'SHAUGHNESSY. 69, 

Adm Srvcs , Emp. 5-6-41, Died 6-20-83 
JAMES PLATT, 83, Shops & Equipment, 

Emp 9-5-46, Died 6-8-83 
JOSEPH PORTEN, 83, Archer, 

Emp 2-12-36, Died 6-17-83 
MARIE SCHEID, 85. Electrical, 

Emp 4-21-41, Died 6-30-83 
WILLILAM SCHMARJE. 68, South Shops, 

Emp 2-9-48, Died 6-5-83 
ERWIN SCHULTZ, 72, West Section, 

Emp 9-27-37, Died 7-22-83 
WILLIAM SHEPARD, 87, Track. 

Emp 10-10-23, Died 7-10-83 
NICHOLAS STASICH. 96, Way & Structs., 

Emp 5-5-21. Died 6-7-83 
EDWARD TROST, 78. Beverly, 

Emp 9-8-23. Died 7-10-83 
WILLIAM WALKER, 43, North Park. 

Emp 9-12 53, Died 7-21-83 
MICHAEL WALSH, 83, 77th Street, 

Emp. 11-2-25, Died 6-21-83 
WON YUIL YOO, 45. North Park, 

Emp 9-3-75, Died 7 14-83 



The following names of deceased retirees were 
omitted from the Number 4 issue of Transit 
News. We apologize for any inconvenience that 
may have been caused by this error. 

ALICE ARKIN. 71. General Office, 

Emp 7-18-57. Died 2-24-83 
CHAIil^ES BLADE. 91. North Section. 

Emp 12-8-11. Died 2-16-83 
HOWARD BOWERS. 60. Forest Glen. 

Emp 11 27-45. Died 2-22-83 
STELLA CEPA. 81. West Section. 

Emp. 9-20-37, Died 2-17-83 
VERNON CONGER, 85. Transportation. 

Emp 6 1 44. Died 2-22 S3 



HERMAN COOK. 94, Kimball, 

Emp. 3-9-28, Died 2- 7-83 
OLIVER DAVIS, Jr., 72, Beverly, 

Emp. 2-20-36. Died 2-11-83 
DOMINICK DIMARIA. 82. Engineering. 

Emp 11-22-23. Died 2-22-83 
MICHAEL DOHERTY. 95, Kedzie, 

Emp 1-25-30, Died 2-27-83 
CHARLES DZIKI. 83. Kimball, 

Emp. 9-25-23, Died 2-27-83 
WILLIAM FEYKES, 88, 77th, 

Emp. 3-3-23. Died 2-14-83 
PATRICK FOGARTY. 84. Beverly. 

Emp. 7-8 26. Died 2-1-83 
WILLIAM FOLTA. 77. Accounting. 

Emp 8-22-22. Died 2-19-83 
SOPHIA HAKENJOS. 88, North Section, 

Emp 9-30-25, Died 1-23-83 
ARTHUR HOLMBERG, 78, 77th, 

Emp 11 10 36, Died 2-21-83 
STANLEY JOZWIAK, 71, Keeler, 

Emp. 6-24 37. Died 2-9-83 
GEORGE MALARZ. 65, Archer, 

Emp 3-24-60, Died 2-28-83 
HENRY McCAULEY, 90, 69th, 

Emp lMO-28, Died 2-13 83 
JOHN MURPHY. 83, 77th, 

Emp 4-17-43, Died 2-22-83 
FULTON NEALY, 74, Shops & Equipment, 

Emp 12-30-35, Died 2-12-83 
HARRY PECHTER, 76, Stores, 

Emp 6-22 28, Died 2-14-83 
CLARENCE PENBERTHY. 85, Shops & 

Equipment. Emp 10-31-22. Died 2-9-83 
JOSEPH PODUCH, 86, Way & Structures. 

Emp 7-17-25, Died 2-2-83 
ALFONSE SHARK, 77, Beverly. 

Emp 1 5-44, Died 2-23-83 
JOHN THOMPSON, 71, 69th. 

Emp 6-30-37, Died 2-12-83 
SALVATORE VITACCO, 83, Limits. 

Emp 11 29-43. Died 2-2-83 
CHARLES WENZEL, 79, Forest Glen. 

Emp 5 4 43. Died 2-18-83 
CASIMIR WIECHOWSKI. 76. Congress. 

Emp ,3 15 44, Died 2-23-83 
DAVID WILLIAMS, 88, Way & Structures, 

Emp 8-24-20. Died 2-2-83 
PATRICK WOLFE. 82. South Shops. 

Emp 4-19-43. Died 2-28-83 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 8 & 9 



23 



II eta EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 




"Purpose" 




To find solutions for problems 




"Goal" 




Keep people working 




• ALCOHOLISM j/^ ^TT^ •LEGAL 

• DRUGS r oof lie J •MARITAL 

• FINANCIAL ^_^^^-ona^ •EMOTIONAL 




eta Employees or family members 




or significant others 




CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 





SUBSCRIBER CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTICE 



YOUR NAME . 



OLD ADDRESS. 
NEW ADDRESS 



Apt. or 
P.O Bo) 



City, State, and Zip Code 



Mail to: CTA TRANSIT NEWS, P.O. Box 3555, Room 734, 
Merchandise Mart, Clilcago, IL 60654. 



To Insure Ih.l ,ou continue lo receive your Tronsll News without dress Notice et least one (1) month prior to moving, or AS SOON 

missing an issue, please till out your Subscriber Change o( Ad AS YOU KNOW YOUR NEW ADDRESS. 




Jack O'Connor, Central Counting, 
celebrated his 40th annwersary with CTA 
in June of 1983 Unfortunatelly. his photo 
was unavailable for the June issue publica- 
tion deadline. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Numbers8&9 

Published (or employees and retirees of CTA by trie 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division, Michael 
N Horowitz. Group Manager 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Attairs Depart- 
ment. Biil Baxa. Manager 

Director of Publicalions: Jack Sowchin 
Editor Rick Willis 
Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva ^ 
Contributing Writers: Ted Radakovic. 
Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees Annual subscription price to 
others. $5 CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734. Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza. PO Box 3555. Chicago. Il- 
linois 60654 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. lUL. 





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SS ^Jp^ 7983 Volume 36-Numbers 11 &12 

F ftCff Transit News 




George E. Norman (left) of ttie f/etro Transit Operating Company, Vancouver, B.C., and CTA's John Odom, 69tfi Street Garage, 
sf)ow off thieir Roadeo trophies during awards presentation at tfie 1983 APTA convention in Denver Norman took first place 
honors v/hile Odom took second. Odom is also holding an individual plaque which was presented to each roadeo participant. 




^ Odom 

i^runner-up in *83 
APTA International 
Bus Roadeo 

(Continued on page 2) 



VV CTA's all-time top bus operator. 

Odom, who was runner-up in the American Public 
Transportation Association (APTA) International Bus 
Roadeo, was hailed as "Number One" by his 69th Street 
Garage peers, and CTA management. 

"Technically, John was in second place, but actually he 
was in first place among people who drove a 40-foot bus," 
Executive Director Bernard J. Ford told the 69th Street 
crowd gathered in the train room for the celebration. Ford 
said the winner, George E. Norman of Vancouver, British 
Columbia, drove a 35-foot bus, "and that's a lot easier," he 
added. 

Only the top two contestants received monetary awards. 
Norman, of Metro Transit Operating Company, garnered 
first place which earned him $1,000 and a special com- 
memorative plaque while Odom received a $500 savings 
bond, and a special commemorative plaque. 

Prior to the celebration in his honor, Odom told friends 
that APTA roadeo contetianfs had seven minutes on the 
course as in previous APTA competitions. He said he was 



determined not to go overtime as he did in 1982 which he 
said hurt him in that contest. Odom said he went through 
the Denver roadco course in five minutes, 20 seconds. 
"Perhaps I was a little faster than was necessary," he said. 
Odom finished the course with 666 points to Norman's 692. 
The maximum points possible was 700. 

Management, co-workers and friends jammed the top 
floor of 69th Street Garage to give Odom their respect for 
his outstanding performance. It was John Odom Day at 
69th Street, and he was the man of the hour as well as the 
perfect roadeo spokesman who urged co-workers to par- 
ticipate. 

"He's good, he's very good, and he has personality," 
Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick c<i\d of the 22-year 
veteran bus operator who is also a minister of the gospel. 
Reddrick said all 61 of the other roadeo contestants con- 
gratulated the CTA champion biis operator for his place- 
ment in the APTA International competition. 

Odom, enveloped in an aura of confidence, stepped to 
the podium very much at home with a microphone as 
friends urged him on with a cry of "speech, speech." He 
smiled as he stood tall in his uniform decorated with pins, 
patches, and a tie clip reminiscent of his roadeo fete. 

As he looked out into the happy throng in a manner befit- 
ting a cleric, Odom said, "I thank God for what we have, 
and for what He has done for me. We went to Denver to be 
a winner, and this is the way it turned out. We did our best." 

"You are a winner, John." came a shout from amidst the 
crowd. "You are a big winner." 

Odom told his well wishers. "I found out one thing: they 
are not giving away the first place trophy. You've got to earn 
it." 

As Ford. Reddrick. Director of Training/Instruction Elon- 
zo Hill, and other management personnel stood behind him 
beaming proudly, Odom told his peers, "Clean up your 
records and come on into this roadeo. I really would like to 
see you participate. It's a lot of fun even if you don't leave 
the state. 

"We had a great time, and we were treated very well. It is 
good to get involved in something concerning your job." 

Alex Johnson, director of Transportation Personnel, 
called Odom "the very best bus operator in these United 
States. We are very proud of him," said Johnson. 

Borrowing a quote from TV and screen actor John 
Houseman, William Thompson, superintendent of Bus In- 
struction and the 1983 roadeo chairman, said, "John, you 
got this honor the old fashioned way, you earned it." 

Transportation Manager Reddrick again gave special 
recognition to the Training/Instruction Section, and par- 
ticularly bus instructors, for their part in the 1983 bus roadeo 
and Odom's success. 

Elonzo Hill, director of Training/Instruction, expressed 
appreciation to the executive director on behalf of the 
roadeo committee for the financial support which made the 
1983 bus roadeo possible. "We could not have done it 
without him," said Hill. 

Meanwhile, Garage Superintendent Clark Carter said he 
expects 15 of the Winning Circle 20 to be 69th Street per- 
sonnel in 1984. "I will accept no less than 12," Carter told 
the crowd. 

Besides Odom, 69th Street personnel in the 1983 Win- 
ning Circle were Rufus Meeks, Laurance Weathersby, 
James Mayes, and Marcellus Williamson. 



From the Chairman 



Progress 
through adversity 



As we approach the new year, it is an excellent time to 
reflect upon the successes that we have achieved 
together, despite a difficult financial climate and a tight 
operating budget. 

Our capital improvement programs have enabled us to 
plan ahead for future transportation needs. The opening 
of the O'Hare Extension to River Road was a great ac- 
complishment, and we look forward to the final extension 
of this service to O'Hare Terminal in 1984. The modern- 
ization of 63rd Street Lower Yard, the renovation of the 
Loop 'L', and the rehabilitation of the Jackson Park line 
are some of the cost-effective programs that will keep our 
rapid tranist system operating efficiently. Bus moderniza- 
tion is advancing as we near completion of the 
technologically-advanced Kedzie Garage and are plan- 
ning another new garage near 103rd Street and Stony 
Island. Fleet modernization continues as we receive 
delivery of modern rapid transit cars, articulated buses, 
and new Flyer buses. 

New operating procedures and innovations, including 
our Employee Safety/Performance Program, have pro- 
vided safer and more timely and efficient service 
throughout our system, highlighted by the fact that 
January was the safest month in CTA history. 
Maintenance, a serious problem in a system as large as 
ours, shows signs of resolve by our managers, and in- 
novations have enabled us to expect extended service life 
for our older buses and reduced down time for our rapid 
transit cars through more effective preventive 
maintenance. 

Our Third Rail Roundup is a model rail employee in- 
centive program for other transit systems, and the ex- 
cellent performance of John Odom at the APTA Interna- 
tional Bus Roadeo is a credit to all of our bus operators 
and training and instruction personnel. 

Through your efforts you have demonstrated our com- 
mitment to provide cost-effective public transportation, 
and I thank our state legislators for endorsing your efforts 
by passing the $75 million transit operating subsidy. 
While this will provide for continued progress in 1984, all 
employees must continue to perform their jobs in a most 
efficient manner. We must demonstrate that public 
transportation is a necessary public service that is worthy 
of support from the tax paying public. 

Once again, I thank all of you for your hard work and 
dedication throughout 1983, and I wish you continued 
success and prosperity in the new year. 



>^2..>^S<2- 



>^a/-- 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Rail roundup employed 
"Mr. Conehead" 

"Mr. Conehead" was a featured performer in 
CTA's recent Third Rail Roundup to pick top 
winners among train crew members. 

The 30-inch-high orange and black striped 
half rubber cone was fabricated in the West 
Shops' sheet metal shop. The spring actuated 
device was operated by pulling a rope to release 
it, and another rope to make it lie down on the 
ties between the running rails. 

Response of the train operator was judged on 
his making a controlled stop under emergency 
conditions, such as a person or debris suddenly 
appearing before the train. 



Top: Eugene Clifford, sheet metal shop 

leader, West Shops, demonstrates spring 

release of pop-up orange and black half 

rubber cone used to judge entrants' 

response to emergency conditions in 

recent Third Rail Roundup for train 

crew members. 

Bottom: Clifford releases spring causing 
special project device, dubbed "Mr Cone- 
head" to pop-up in between running rails 
as entrant's train approached. 




1983 Innovations boost culture bus ridership 



While culture itself knows no limits, 
CTA's Culture Bus does operate in a 
time frame dictated by seasonal in- 
terest. The seventh year of this 
popular service ended September 
25th, after 26 Sundays and holidays 
of taking riders to Chicago's most 
popular cultural attractions. 

Ridership was up about 13 percent 
over the comparable period of 1982 
during a season that began and ended 
earlier than last year. April 24th was 
chosen as opening day partly because 
a mild winter seemed to indicate 
spring would come early, and also to 
allow bus operators to choose Culture 
Bus runs during the spring pick. 

Innovations in 1983 included exten- 
ding the North Culture Bus route to 
the Elks Memorial at Diversey and 
Lakeview, and operating West route 
buses at 30-minute intervals, instead 
of hourly, throughout the season. 
Also, on the West route, a women's 
group at the Holy Trinity Russian Or- 



thodox Cathedral arranged to meet 
each bus and take interested riders on 
free tours of the famous Louis 
Sullivan-designed church. 

Sponsors of the "Here's Chicago" 
film and slide show in the old Chicago 
Avenue pumping station joined the 
ranks of other attractions in offering 
discounts to riders with Culture Bus 
supertransfers. Discounts were already 
provided by the John Hancock and 
Sears Tower observatories, and by 
Ripley's "Believe It or Not" museum in 
Old Town. 

All these features continued to 
make the Culture Bus one of the best 
bargains in town for visiting the more 
than 30 points of interest along the 
three routes. What makes the service 
really special, however, is the guided 
tour provided by volunteer commen- 
tators on each bus. 

Thirty commentators worked mostly 
on alternate Sundays to fill the 44 bus 
runs that were operated every day of 



the season. Through a public address 
system on the articulated buses used 
for the service, they told riders 
historical and other facts about land- 
marks and neighborhoods they were 
passing. This information was written 
into scripts prepared by the Public Af- 
fairs Department. 

Also in 1983, for the second season 
in a row, handicapped riders on 
Special Services buses were able to 
enjoy Culture Bus tours. By ar- 
rangements coordinated through 
Superintendent Isaac Seal, handicap- 
ped riders were taken to accessible 
cultural attractions on each of the 
routes. 

This service, which was operated on 
alternate Sundays throughout the 
regular season, attracted 484 riders -- 
more than three times the number 
served in 1982. The total number of 
riders boarding all Culture Buses at the 
Art Institute originating point was 
42,800. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



Engineers plan new garage 
for 103rd Street near Stony 




Model of proposed CTA bus garage at 103rd Street and Stony Island Avenue on a 16-acre site. Completion of 250-bus garage will mean 
better service for Soutfi Side riders. Buses will be stored indoors so riders will have warm buses on frosty mornings. Garage will use 
sunlight to help lower heating cost. 



Another multi-million dollar bus 
garage in the second generation of 
CTA bus facilities is being planned for 
future construction. The new facility 
will include several features which are 
designed to reduce operating costs. 

The new garage, a brick, steel and 
glass structure, will be erected on a 
16-acre site north of 103rd Street and 
east of Interstate 94 (Stony Island 
Avenue). Funding is being provided 
by the Illinois Department of Transpor- 
tation, and the Urban Mass Transpor- 
tation Administration. 

The Kedzie garage, first of the new 
bus garage facilities, is nearing the final 
phase of construction at South Kedzie 
Avenue between Jackson Boulevard 
and West Van Buren Street That 
facility is slated for occupancy in the 
spring of 1984. 

First of the new features in the pro- 
posed 250-capacity bus garage to be 



erected at 103rd Street and Stony 
Island Avenue will be a window wall 
300 feet long and 24 feet high which is 
designed to collect heat. The one level 
structure will have a cluster of skylights 
facing south which will provide natural 
daylight to the eight acre interior of the 
garage. The skylights will also act as 
additional heat collectors during the 
winter months, according to CTA 
engineers. 

F. H Petzold, CTA project 
manager, said the huge glass panel 
will convert the sunlight's energy into 
heated warm air which will be added 
to the garage's forced warm air heating 
system which will be fueled by natural 
gas. C. G Kalogeras, director. Design 
and Construction, called it passive 
heat. Explaining the principle, 
Kalogeras said. "Imagine sunlight 
coming through the window and 
heating the floor; that is passive heat." 



Another economizing move planned 
for the building is the use of heat 
exchange facilities which will provide 
up to 30 percent of the cold weather 
energy requirements, engineers have 
determined. 

The problem of open bus garage 
doors for vehicular traffic, a principal 
source of heat loss, will also be greatly 
reduced in the proposed facility with 
the use of an air lock system which is 
designed to minimize the loss of 
building heat. 

Another environmental cost saving 
feature planned for the giant garage 
will be the use of three diesel powered 
generators for electricity. By using 
generators at peak demand periods for 
power from the electric company. 
CTA should realize an estimated sav- 
ings of $100,000 annually for elec- 
trical service, Kalogeras said. 

The garage complex will also in- 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




McCarter named to 
Hall of Fame 



Side view of proposed bus garage at 103rd Street and Stony Island Avenue. When com- 
pleted, the 250 to 300 bus garage will incorporate energy saving techniques. 



elude a 100,000 gallon underground 
diesel fuel storage facility, a building 
for storing up to 1,000 tons of salt, 
and a building to house utility vehicles 
and related equipment. It will also 
have its own bus refuse collection 
system, including compacting and 
containerized removal of refuse. 

Adequate indoor parking space is 
expected to accommodate the 
garage's fleet of 250 buses during cold 
weather months, thus eliminating the 
costly practice of keeping the vehicles 
running throughout the night to assure 
their early morning operation in sub- 
freezing temperatures. Parking the 
buses indoors should substantially 
reduce fuel consumption, another cost 
saving factor 



Among safety features in the new 
building will be the inclusion of several 
independent fire sprinkler systems. 
The design also provides space for 
other CTA bus line terminations with 
heated shelters for riders. Offices will 
be provided for personnel of the 
Transportation Department, Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance Depart- 
ment, and Equipment Engineering 
and Maintenance. Off-street parking 
will also be available for employees 
and visitors. 

Plans for the new garage are being 
developed by the consulting firm of 
Baker Engineering, Inc., in coopera- 
tion with CTA Design and Construc- 
tion staff, as well as members of other 
CTA departments. 





Former CTA General Manager 
Walter J. McCarter was one of 10 

distinguished transit professionals in- 
ducted into the new transit Hall of 
Fame October 25 during the American 
Public Transit Association's annual 
meeting in Denver. 

The honor is reserved for transit 
professionals and policy board 
members of APTA who have made 
outstanding contributions to the mass 
transit industry on a sustained basis. 

McCarter received the APTA 
recognition as a leader and planner 
who made local and national contribu- 
tions to the modernization of rail tran- 
sit in the United States. 

He joined CTA as its first general 
manager on Oct. 1, 1947 and served 
until his retirement Oct. 1, 1964 when 
he moved to St. Thomas, the Virgin 
Islands. Prior to his 17 years with 
CTA, McCarter was a transit system 
general manager in Cleveland, Ohio. 
He also served as president of the In- 
stitute for Rapid Transit. 



Top view ol proposed 103rd Street and Stony Island Avenue garage showing skylights for 
illumination. Two sets of doors will create air locfi for buses exiting and entering garage. 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



Commendation Comer 



Wesley Cobbs (Washington 
Garage) is appreciated as 
operator of a Special Ser- 
vices bus by Robert Janis, 
physical plant manager at 
DePaul University's 
downtown campus. "I 
believe that credit should 
be given when it is due. 
The credit comes from 
myself and others in the 
university administration, 
and from the handicapped 
students who take advan- 
tage of the services that 
the CTA provides via Mr. 
Cobbs. I have personally 
noted on a number of oc- 
casions how kind and con- 
siderate he is to the 
special passengers he 
serves. He extends himself 
far beyond the usual re- 
quirements of the job to 
add a very personal touch." 




IVIilan Davidovic (North Park 
garage) was commended by 
Suzanne Hanna, of H/ladison, 
Wisconsin, who was a rider 
on his No. 151 Sheridan bus. 
"When we exited at Water 
Tower Place, a young man 
and his accomplices staged 
some confusion at the door, 
and used the opportunity to 
steal my father's wallet. My 
father was quick enough to 
realize what had happened, 
and alerted the driver. Your 
employee acted quickly to 
help, and discovered the 
wallet in the young man's 
possession. He even attemp- 
ted to detain the man for 
police. I am most grateful for 
his cooperation. The service 
he rendered was greatly ap- 
preciated." 



Motormen Charles Cooke (North Section) and 
William Brown (South Section), and conductor Martin 
Kane (North Section) were praised by Alfreida Livingston, 
of North Lake Shore Drive. "Loud explosions jarred the 
(Howard-bound) train, and fire and smoke overtook the se- 
cond car. The passengers began to get frightened, and 
stcirted to leave their seats. The conductor responded im- 
mediately, telling everyone to remain calm, and explained 
what happened. The motorman (Cooke) also responded, 
and between the two of them, they were able to get the train 
moving again. When the problem resurfaced at the next sta- 
tion, the motorman of the train behind pulled into the sta- 
tion, and all three worked as a team to curb the problem. 
They were efficient and speedy, and seemed to know exact- 
ly what they were doing. These men exemplified qualities of 
leadership and skill in a difficult situation." 

Helen Edwards (North Section) is admired by Barbara 
Bunn , of Evanston , who regularly passes through the South 
Boulevard station. "This agent is pleasant and courteous to 
riders. 1 look forward to my encounters with her. Even when 
I do not speak to her myself, her manner with the other 
riders is thoughtful and considerate. During times of 
emergency, she has acted as a communicator to warn riders 
entering the station. She is accurate and quick. Her 
presence here is appreciated." 

Emanuel Paul (Forest Glen garage) was applauded by 
Bonnie Ziethen, of Byron Street, for his alertness as 
operator of a No. 80 Irving Park bus. At the Keeler stop, two 
youths were trying to get my purse. I did not know this, but 
the driver hollered loudly to warn me. He saw them through 
his mirror. Some drivers are not this alert. He also is 
courteous and does his job well. Today, conscientious peo- 
ple need encouragement. That's why 1 am writing this 
letter." 



Leroy Carr (Forest Glen garage) was thanked for his 
helpfulness as operator of a No. 85A North Central bus by 
Rev. Richard Gilbert, of Bowling Green, Ohio. "What a fine 
man, the kind of driver from the old days when 1 was grow- 
ing up. He had a personal greeting for everyone. My family 
and I were quickly spotted as out-of-towners, remembered 
each day, and given all the information we needed to find 
our way. On our last day, the driver spotted a foreign stu- 
dent who spoke limited English. He took the time to match 
the young man up with us, and together we found our way 
to the airport." 

Isaiah Phillips (Beverly garage) pleased Marlene 
McKinney, of Parnell Avenue, for his consideration one 
Sunday as operator of a No. 34 South Michigan bus. "Fully 
one block from the stop as the bus approached, I began to 
frantically wave my hands (thinking of the 15-minute wait 
for the next one). Spotting me, he immediately let me know 
he intended to wait for me. As I boarded the bus effusive 
with thanks, 1 was greeted by a pleasant smile - the smile of 
a man who not only enjoys his work, but also has a high 
regard for himself and others. Blessings to you. No. 9807." 

Arnold Emery (Limits garage) won the approval of Nor- 
deen Anderson, of Pine Grove Avenue, for enforcing 
regulations on his No. 8 Halsted bus. "He is the most 
courteous and pleasant driver I have seen for a long time. 
He is also a good custodian of the bus. Some time ago, a 
passenger got on, walked to the back of the bus, put his feet 
on the seat in front of him, which was sideways, started to 
smoke a cigarette, and pushed out the emergency window. 
This kind gentleman -- the bus driver -- politely told him to 
get off, as he was disobeying the rules. He did slowly get off. 
I was very pleased with this action." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Commendation Corner 



William Walls (Archer garage) 
is held in high esteem by Bet- 
ty Bates, of Federal Street, 
who was a rider on his 47th 
Street bus. "He is one of the 
most courteous and respect- 
ful bus drivers I have ever had 
the opportunity to ride with. 
He seems to really enjoy his 
work, and keeps his mind on 
his lob. He is very alert, and I 
also noticed that no matter 
what the weather conditions, 
he is most helpful. I observed 
him helping senior citizens on 
or off the bus, and he pulled 
in extra close to the curb so 
they could board and alight. 
He speaks kindly to young 
and old, and is also very 
dependable." 




Eloise Carter (77th Street 
garage) gets high marks from 
Clarence Farde, of East 41st 
Street, for her handling of a 
No. 3 King Drive bus. "I have 
had the pleasure of riding 
with her three times, and each 
time she bids her riders a 
cheery 'Good morning' as 
they enter, and 'Have a nice 
day' as they leave. I heard one 
lady say, 'I sure will, for you 
have certainly made my day. ' 
What a joy it is to ride with 
this lady. Not only is she ex- 
tremely courteous, calling out 
eet numbers and the like, 
t she is also well groomed, 
d she drives her bus with 
rat care." 



Freddie Washington (North Section) is held in the 
highest esteem by Patricia Sharon, of Evanston, for rescuing 
her two-year-old son from the Evanston rapid transit right- 
of-way. "Jordan was playing in our backyard and managed 
to unlock the gate. He loves trains and ran pushing his toy 
duck to where he often sees them pass -- the crossing at 
Isabella. Mr. Washington saw my son in the direct path of 
the train, reacted promptly by stopping the train before the 
crossing, and taking my son in his arms to safety. 1 will never 
forget the sight of my son safe and sound in the arms of Mr, 
Washington. To me this was a miracle. 1 haven't the words 
to express my deepest appreciation and gratitude." 

Nolan Lett (West Section) was remembered by John 
Tomac, of Cicero, for his assistance as conductor of a 
Milwaukee-Douglas train. "Mom is in a wheelchair. When 
No. 22666 spotted us waiting for the train, he went the 
length of four cars to assist us, directing us to a car that had a 
section for handicapped people. He was most helpful with 
information, and very pleasant. I've traveled the 'L's for 40 
years, and never knew they had anything for handicapped 
people. Now we know, thanks to him." 



Sylvester Ermon (77th Street garage) was appreciated 
by Fritz Veit, of East 55th Street, for his alertness as operator 
of a No. 6 Jeffery Express bus. "Somewhere between 53rd 
and 55th Streets, a man suddenly moved toward me and 
grabbed my shoulder. He acted as if he were about to fall 
and would need support. The driver observed what occur- 
red. In a loud, clear voice he said several times, 'Be careful, 
pickpocket. Be careful of the chick, too.' I had not been 
aware that the man had a confederate. The driver frustrated 
the attempted theft. I am pleased that he had such concern 
for his passengers." 

Walter Lewis Jr. (North Park garage) was the operator 
of a No. 151 Sheridan bus ridden by Carol Gaitu, of Pine 
Grove Avenue. "I was attempting to board the bus, 
unaware that two young men were attempting to steal my 
purse. Your driver saw what was happening, warned me, 
and chased the thieves off. Had it not been for his vigilance, 
I would now be minus my purse and its contents. I will be 
most grateful if you would convey my thanks and admira- 
tion to the driver. It is comforting to know that the public can 
rely on such people for help in threatening situations." 



Raymond McHugh (Forest Glen garage) was the 
operator of a No. 81 Lawrence bus that Wladyslawa 
Czijka frequently takes on his way nome to North Keystone 
Avenue. "Without a doubt, he is one of the most pleasant 
drivers I have run across in a long time. Sometimes traffic 
causes my RTA bus to be late to the Jefferson Park terminal, 
but I can be sure that this driver will be waiting for me with a 
nice 'Hello.' Just the other day we were about three minutes 
late, and driver No. 8822 was there waiting. I would like to 
let him know that we appreciate the kind of dedication to 
passengers that he so ably displays." 



Ethel Claiborne (77th Street garage) was thanked for 
her help in recovering a handbag that was left on her No. 3 
King Drive bus by Jacqueline Smith, who works on West 
Wacker Drive. "Through your sophisticated communica- 
tions system, along with loyal and dedicated personnel, my 
handbag was retrieved. I wish to extend my personal thanks 
to Ms. Claiborne, who returned the lost article. Harry 
(Horn) the dispatcher kept me constantly informed of the 
status (of the search), and pursued the issue until comple- 
tion. Concern even was shown by Delores (Walker), the 
switchboard attendant (at 77th Street). 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



Exceptional 

service 

earns eight 

employees 

recognition 



Four bus operators and three rail 
employees, whose discipline and 
quick thinking averted catastrophe in 
grave situations occurring at their work 
locations, were the recipients of 
special recognition on "A Day in 
CTA." 

A rail crew member on the Lake 
Dan Ryan Rapid Transit service was 
also honored on "A Day in CTA" for 
the praise he continues to receive from 
Lake Dan Ryan riders as an outstan- 
ding conductor. 

Robert Desvignes, director of Ad- 
ministration and Performance Con- 
trol, said Operator Norma J. Porter 
"acted very responsibly" toward her 
passengers when a suspect boarded 
her bus at 94th and Woodlawn during 
a recent late evening run and an- 
nounced a holdup. Ms. Porter used 
her emergency alarm and monitor to 
summon police who apprehended 
one of the two men. 

Although Ms. Porter was later 
treated for anxiety due to extreme 
duress, Desvignes said that, because 
she remained calm during the inci- 




Extraordinary service earned special recognition, as 'A Day in CTA' honorees, for this 
group of operating employees being presented by Robert Desvignes (left), director of Ad- 
ministration and Performance Control. Proudly displaying their certificates are Freddie L. 
Washington. Howard Terminal: Willie Watkins, Desplaines Yard; Norma J. Porter. Person- 
nel Records, formerly of 77th Street Garage; Transportation IVIanager Harry Reddrick, and 
John Cameron, 95th Street Terminal. 



dent, lives were probably spared and 
injury to patrons avoided. 

Other heroic actions worthy of 
special recognition on "A Day in CTA" 
included Motorman Freddie L. 
Washington who stopped his north- 
bound Evanston Express train at the 
Isabella Street crossing, where he 
removed a two year old boy from the 
track and returned him to his family. 

The child was spotted playing in the 
middle of the tracks where he was in 
danger of coming in contact with the 
third rail as well as being struck by a 
train. Washington also received a let- 
ter of commendation from the child's 
grateful parents. (See Commmenda- 
tion Corner) 

Meanwhile, Willie W. Watkins, a 
switchman at the Desplaines Yard, 
received the kudos of his supervisors 
and was recognized along with other 
honorees for his quick response to 
smoke which he saw coming from a 
wheel assembly of a rail car during a 
pull-in to the yard. 

Watkins notified the shop foreman 
immediately, whereupon the car was 



inspected and found to have a broken 
axle. Rail service personnel said the 
veteran switchman's alertness 
prevented possible injuries, delay, and 
costly equipment damage. 

"A Day in CTA" honorees also in- 
cluded two 77th Street Garage bus 
operators who were praised for their 
individual responses in separate in- 
cidents. Desvignes said Isaac Presley 
rushed to the scene of a shooting inci- 
dent at 63rd and King Drive where 
another bus operator had been 
wounded. 

He said Presley gave aid and com- 
fort to the gunshot victim until help ar- 
rived, and collected information for 
the control center. 

Another honoree from 77th Street 
Garage was Columbus Woods who 
guided a runaway bus into a curb near 
the bus turnaround at 94th and Burn- 
side after the vehicle's brakes failed. 

The brakes quit after Woods pulled 
into the turnaround. The veteran bus 
operator sounded the horn to warn 
other people in the area, and directed 
his ailing bus into the curb across the 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Peer Group Review 



Robert Desvignes (center), director, Administration and Performance Control, escorts 
"Day in CTA " tionorees on a tour of control center facilities. They are bus operators Col- 
umbus Woods (left), 77tti Street Garage; Joyce Bell, Limits Garage; ticket agent IVIona 
fJloore, and bus operator Isaac Presley, 77th Street Garage. 



street from the turnaround. By taking 
such direct action, Woods avoided 
contact with other buses in the bus tur- 
naround as well as other street traffic. 

Transportation officials also ap- 
plauded Ticket Agent Mona Moore for 
her quick wit as she slowed up robbers 
on a hot summer night long enough 
for them to be caught in the act by the 
police and taken into custody. 

The episode began shortly before 
midnight August 25 when two men 
approached Ms. Moore's booth and 
announced a holdup. The agent im- 
mediately activated her silent alarm 
and stalled the duo with talk. Police ar- 
rived while the robbery was still in pro- 
gress. Officers apprehended one 
suspect at the scene and the second a 
short distance away. All but 70 cents 
of Ms. Moore's receipts were 
recovered. 

A delayed "Day in CTA" recogni- 
tion was also accorded Limits 
Operator Joyce Bell for the role she 
played in the arrest last January of 
three ruffians who converged on a 
man alighting from a bus near 
Madison and Ashland Avenue, where 



the three assaulted and robbed him. 

Ms. Bell who was working near the 
location as a pool supervisor, wit- 
nessed the incident. She positioned 
her car so that its headlights shone on 
the victim and his three attackers. 
Police were summoned and the 
suspects were apprehended. 

Subsequently, the trio was brought 
to trial, convicted and sentenced to 
three years in jail. Assistant State's At- 
torney John D. Cooney praised Ms. 
Bell for her assistance and coopera- 
tion. 

Finally, the uniquely descriptive 
language of Conductor John R. 
Cameron of the 95th Street terminal, 
which has pleased Lake Dan Ryan 
riders over the last five years and 
established rapport with the riding 
public, has earned the affable conduc- 
tor "A Day in CTA" recognition 
Cameron, dubbed "the rapper." has 
previously earned numerous com- 
mendations for his performance as a 
rail conductor. Desvignes said, "We 
wish to commend Mr. Cameron and 
motivate him to excellence in all areas 
of job related performance." 




Paul Kadowaki, CTA Area 
Superintendent of Instruction, joined 
other transportation officials from 
Pittsburgh, Houston, Oakland and 
Los Angeles to form an Accident Peer 
Group Review for a study of the San 
Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). 
Kadowaki was the review group's 
recording secretary. The five-member 
peer group met in San Francisco 
August 24-25 and September 15-16 
to examine Muni's hiring process, 
training programs, incentive/motiva- 
tional programs and discipline code, 
and made suggestions for accident 
reductions. 

The Public Utilities Commission for 
the City and County of San Francisco 
gave Kadowaki and other members of 
the Peer Group Review special 
recognition for their service with a 
special resolution, which expressed 
appreciation to the Accident Peer 
Group Review members for the series 
of recommendations. 

The resolution said. "The Public 
Utilities Commission extends its 
sincere thanks and appreciation for the 
hard work and excellence of support 
and expertise that this group brought 
to the Municipal Railway and the 
citizens of San Francisco." 



7983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



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Soldier Field, the municipal stadium where football fans 
root for Chicago's gridiron gladiators each Sunday, wel- 
comed a different competitor recently as 200 physically 
disabled athletes from across the nation met for the seventh 
National Wheelchair Softball Tournament. 

The event was sponsored by the Rehabilitation Institute of 
Chicago, the Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Wheelchair Sports 
Program, and the National Wheelchair Softball Association. 

The athletes, representing 14 teams from Dallas, Texas to 
Nashville, Tenn., and Detroit, Mich., to Minneapolis, 
Minn., gave credence to the words, "guts, stamina, and 
determination," keys to any serious athlete's success. 

Emerging victorious after two days and 31 games of play 
was Chicago's own Pacemakers who, under the able bodied 
coaching of Darnell Langston, and CTA bus operator Allen 
Willis of North Avenue Garage, survived a double elimina- 
tion playoff to shutout the Minnesota Rolling Gophers of 
Minneapolis, 5-0, taking the championship, and increasing 
the Pacemakers' won-lost record to 4-0. 

First base coach Willis who also scouts for the 
Pacemakers, is an invaluable help to the team, according to 




Coach Allen Willis (left), and Coach Darnell Langston observe 
players of the Chicago Pacemakers at Soldier Field. 

Langston, and team captain Bob Trotter, director of 
therapeutic recreation for the Chicago Rehabilitation In- 
stitute of Chicago. 

Langston said Willis' knowledge of the game as well as his 
willingness to scout the games of potential opponents, 
coupled with the team's frequent and intimidating chant of 
"shoot-sha, shoot-sha" has made the Pacemakers an adver- 
sary not to be taken lightly. 

Willis who began his volunteer service with the 
Pacemakers three years ago, also serves as the bus driver on 
road trips. "He helps us in many ways," said Langston. "1 



10 




Finding the strike zone is no problem for Pacemakers' winning 
pitcher Dave Ryan. 

enjoy working with the team in any way that I can be of 
assistance," said Willis, brother-in-law to team manager Bob 
Trotter. "I enjoy the sport, and the opportunity to be a part 
of the organization. It gives me a chance to share with 
others," said Willis. "Besides," he added, "I have known 
many of these guys for a very long time." 

Pacemakers participating in the tournament reflect a wide 
spectrum of backgrounds and physical abilities, but together 
they accomplished the single goal of victory for Chicago, 
and received the proper recognition at an awards banquet 
held later in the Americana Congress Hotel where DePaul 
Coach Ray Meyer was speaker. 

Perhaps one of the best organized wheelchair softball 
teams in the business, the Pacemakers rely upon each other 
for practically every aspect of the game. "Sometimes it may 
take as many as four players to properly execute a double 
play," said Langston, "but we get the job done as a team," 
he said. 

"Wheelchair softball is a sport, and we are athletes who 
want people to see us as athletes," said Langston. "The 
training and the intensity is just as rigorous and involved as it 
would be for able bodied people," he said. 

Said Willis, "We have worked hard, and we have played 
well routing every opponent on the field until victory. Now 
we are looking forward to a new year." 

Persons interested in wheelchair sports may contact 
Robert Trotter at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, 
649-6168. 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




A member of the Rolling Gophers swings away with 
power, but his bat isn't big enough to stop Chicago 
Pacemakers from taking the National Wheelchair Softball 
Association championship. 

Pacemakers team manager Bob Trotter (at table), direc- 
tor, therapeutic recreation, Chicago Rehabilitation In- 
stitute of Chicago, keeps statistics as he watches play 
action with other players and supporters. 

First place trophy in the seventh annual National 
Wheelchair Softball Tournament is presented to 
Pacemakers team captain Perry Bender (right) by DePaul 
basketball coach Ray Meyer. Bender, a student at DeVry 
Institute, was voted the game's all star short center. He 
is a single amputee. 

A member of the Chicago Pacemakers is poised to make 
an attempt at knocking this ball into traffic. The Chicago 
team's power hitters kept opposing teams on the move. 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 




Paul Kaike (left), communications design engineer, and BIrnest Hicks, signal designer, 
study plans for consoles' select call public address system serving 143 rapid transit sta- 
tion platforms and ticket agents. KaIke is project manager for ttie multi-million dollar P. A. 
system that will keep people at stations informed of service conditions. 



First of two new rail controllers' consoles in th 
console will be duplicate of first to be used in 
are connected to station platform monitors fo 

New communis 




Ollie Winston (standing), rail/power controller, and Harry Horn, assistant superintendent 
of controllers, take a last long look at ttie old CTA tiandmade console which has operated 
continuously for more than 30 years. Behind them is the automatic dispatching system 
which signals train crews at terminals when to start running their train, leaving graph 
devices precisely chart movement of trains on all rapid transit routes. 



Final stages of a $15 million com- 
munications improvement project in 
the CTA Control Center at the Mer- 
chandise Mart are being completed by 
Facilities Engineering and 
Maintenance. 

The multi-million dollar develop- 
ment will help provide rapid transit 
crews with improved communications, 
and riders with better travel informa- 
tion through a modern, select call 
public address system. 

"The entire project in the Control 
Center and on the rail routes is ex- 
pected to be completed by January, 
1984," said Ronald Swindell, director 
of the Power, Signal, & Communica- 
tions section. 

Swindell is project manager for the 
radio communications project, and 
Paul KaIke, communications design 
engineer, is project manager for the 
public address system which connects 
the rail controllers to 143 stations and 
their ticket agents' booths. Presently 
work in the Control Center is being 
done by electricians Ray Pacheco, 
Mike Stosich, and Jack Hobbs. Di- 
recting them are Kendrick Bissett, 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




of being assembled in the control center. Second 
ds or as backup. TV sets suspended from ceiling 
d passenger security. 



Ronald Swindell (left), director of Power, Signal, Communications section, points out con- 
sole wiring plan to electrician Ray Pacheco. Swindell is project managerof $15 million im- 
provement for riders, train crews, and rail controllers. 



ons system will benefit train crews and riders 



superintendent of Signal Communica- 
tions Design; Birnest Hicks, signal 
designer, and Kalke. 

The "heart" of this $15 million im- 
provement consists of two U-shaped 
rail controllers' consoles equipped with 
the latest two-way radio facilities for 
direct contact with train crews and rail 
supervisors. These consoles also have 
select call public address systems 
which controllers use to alert people 
on rapid transit platforms to changing 
traffic conditions. 

"Out on the rail routes we are 
adding additional train occupancy cir- 
cuits," Swindell said. "Eventually we 
will also add additional train occupan- 
cy circuits when the proposed 
southwest rail extension is built from 
Roosevelt Road to Midway Airport." 

The train occupancy track circuits 
are part of a system by which rail con- 
trollers are able to monitor the on-time 
progress of each train on a particular 
rapid transit route as the train makes 
its scheduled route. Continuous mov- 
ing pen graph charts are programmed 
to a master pendulum clock to operate 
at a speed of 12 inches per hour. Five- 



minute time points are printed on the 
graphs. Ink pens at the tops of the 
downward-moving charts indicate 
"blips" when trains enter track circuits 
at points along the six rapid transit 
routes. These blips hold until the train 
leaves the track circuit; then the pen 
returns to its normal position. 

George Krambles, retired CTA ex- 
ecutive director who was instrumental 
in developing the present rail control 
center in the 1950s, recalled: 

"Because we had to have a method 
of tracing train traffic to provide riders 
with dependable scheduled service, 
CTA came up with its moving graph 
chart and ink pen method. It mini- 
mized the installation cost and pro- 
duced a permanent record showing 
clearly and simply where train opera- 
tions were good, bad, or so-so." 

Coupled with the moving pen graph 
charts are 17 train dispatching devices 
located at each terminal and at other 
points along each route — all controlled 
by the master pendulum clock. When 
a train is scheduled to depart its ter- 
minal, a bell rings once and a green 
light goes on, signalling the conductor 



to close the train's doors and alert the 
motorman to go. 

The new metal U-shaped consoles, 
equipped with space age technological 
refinements, are replacing a straight 
line wooden console that was assem- 
bled in CTA shops back in the early 
1950s. The new consoles and their 
equipment were built by Motorola. 

Electricians assembling the new 
consoles have had to hand wire more 
than 10,000 connections and install 
thousands of feet of cable for both 
units. 

"The second console," Swindell ex- 
plained, "is identical to the first so as to 
allow controllers more working space 
in rush periods. One unit can also be 
used as a substitute should the other 
one malfunction. That's an important 
backup feature we didn't have with the 
old console. 

"Fortunately, the old console held 
in there all these years, even when we 
moved it from the old Control Center 
to the present location back in 1977. 

"It never stopped running until we 
turned on our new number one unit 
and pulled the plug on the old one." 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



13 



Public Safet\; Awards 

Forest Park 
continues its long 
honors record 



Public Safety awards for the second 
qucirter of 1983 were presented to 
69th Street Garage and Forest Park 
Terminal. It was the fifth time 69th 
Street has taken the award and the 
first time since the third quarter, 1975. 

The south side garage won the PSA 
with a traffic rate of 4.99 accidents per 
100,000 miles during the quarter, a 
three percent better rate than the en- 
tire bus system rate of 5.13. 

Sixty-ninth Street Garage ex- 
perienced a passenger rate of 1.14, a 
little more than one passenger acci- 
dent for every 100,000 miles of opera- 
tion which was three percent better 
than the system rate of 1.18. The 
garage had 20 accident-free days in 
the second quarter. 

CTA safety analysts said it was the 
19th time Forest Park Terminal won 
the PSA. Its last award came in the 
fourth quarter of 1981. In the second 
quarter of 1983 Forest Park Terminal 
operated with a combined traffic and 
passenger rate of 0.264 per 100,000 
car miles, less than one accident for 
every 350,000 miles of operation dur- 
ing the quarter. The terminal had 88 
accident-free days. 

Forest Park Terminal took its 20th 
PSA in the third quarter as terminal 
personnel experienced another 88 
accident-free days period. The ter- 
minal recorded a combined traffic and 
passenger rate of 0.299 per 100,000 
car miles in the third quarter— less 
than one accident for every 300,000 
miles of operation. 

Meanwhile, Forest Glen Garage, 
another third quarter winner, had 28 
accident-free days. The north side 
garage earned the PSA for the 13th 
time with a traffic rate of 3.98 ac- 
cidents per 100,000 miles, 25 percent 
better than the bus system rate of 
5.28. 

The garage also experienced a 
passenger rate of 0.70. In other 
words, less than one accident per 
100,000 miles of operation. The rate 
is 40 percent better than the bus 
system of 1.16. 




Public Safely Analyst McCarthy (left) presents ttie Public Safety plaque to Forest Park 
Terminal Superintendent Alex Wilson (center), and Carl Davis, assistant terminal 
superintendent. 




Clark Carter (left), superintendent, 69//) Street Garage, and Alex Johnson, director, 
Transportation Personnel, accept the Interslation Safety Contest plaque from Michael 
l^cCarthy, principal public safety analyst. It was the fifth PSA lor 69th Street Garage. 




Carl Davis (left), assistant superintendent. Forest Park Terminal, and Cynthia Florence, 
assistant superintendent. Near North area, accept the Interstation Safety Contest plaque 
for the third quarter from Safety Ivlanager Tom Boyle. Alex Wilson, terminal superinten- 
dent, and Mike Lacriola, (right), area superintendent. Near North, were on hand for the 
presentation. It was Forest Park Terminal's second consecutive Public Safety award. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



■mi 




Study Group 



A Japanese National Railways study team conducting research on the feasibility of implementing high speed rail service in 
corridors flowing from Chicago's central business district visited CTA in September, and met with Chairman Michael A. Car- 
dilli. The team was hosted by James Blaa (left), special assistant to CTA Executive Director Bernard J. Ford, and Paul 
Kadowaki (right), area superintendent. Instruction. Members of the group are (from left) Blaa, Dr. Shigeo Miki, assistant to 
director. Planning Section, Railway Technical Research Institute; Tatsuru Saito, senior electric engineer. International 
Department; Shoichi Fukada, director. Planning Division, Shinkansen Construction Department, group leader; Norihiro 
Kobayashi, civil engineer. International Department; Chairman Cardilli, Yo Ebisawa, and Kadowaki. 

Highway assistance 
digest offered 

The National Highway Safety Foun- 
dation publishes a pocket-size digest 
designed to take the guesswork out of 
what to do if you need help on the 
highway. 

The 68-page "Highway Assistance 
Digest" contains the emergency 
telephone numbers of the highway 
patrols throughout the U.S., accident 
procedures, state driving regulations, 
AM-FM radio stations, first aid, tourist 
information offices, how to deal with 
motor vehicle-emergencies and other 
information. 

The digest also provides a list of fuel 
locations that are open 24 hours a 
day, accept VISA and MasterCard, 
have a mechanic, road service and 
food. 

The digest is available for $1 plus $1 
postage and handling from the Na- 
tional Highway Safety Foundation, 
116 E. State St., Ridgeland, MS 
39157. 




Choosing Careers 



High school students whose career choices are expected to lead to baccalaureate 
degrees in public transportation participated in a CTA mini Technical Institute (TI) 
this summer at the request of the South Eastern Michigan Transit Authority 
(SEMTA). The students, all from the Detroit area, were employed during the 
summer by companies doing business with SEMTA. Adult sponsors of the group 
are SEMTA employees. CTA hosts were Violet Brooks, librarian (standing, 4th 
from right); Robert Ryan, special projects coordinator, Public Affairs/Consumer 
Services (standing, second from right), and Marjorie Holmes (standing, right). 



1983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



15 





Rail evacuation 

drill is largest 

in city's history 




I!F»I 


^V^ 


lU^ 



^^^ 



^»> 



A- 



f 



^v#f' 



CTA's third emergency rail evacua- 
tion drill in as many years was held on 
Sunday. September 25, at the Quin 
cy /Wells Outer Loop station. The 
Westside Emergency Health Planning 
Organization, an association of 13 
hospitals, initiated the drill, which was 
the largest mock disaster exercise in 
the city's history. 

Sponsors included the hospital 
group. CTA, the Chicago Fire, Police. 
Public Safety and Human Services 
Departments, the Chicago Board of 
Health, the American Red Cross, the 
Private Ambulance Organization and 
the Salvation Army. 

The scenario for the drill depicted a 
fairly crowded six-car. 2400-senes 
Ravenswood train approaching the 
station southbound and having the 



Not even M.A.S.H. 

could match the 

gory "injuries" 

exhibited by student 

"victims" of a mocf< 

rail emergency 

at Quincy/Wells 

station. 



rear truck of the head car derail 
eastward. The derailed truck then 
ostensibly struck the third rail, causing 
a fire in the truck assembly. 

After the motorman notified the 
Control Center of the situation, the 
Control Center alerted the responding 
agencies and put the emergency plan 
into effect. Meanwhile, the train crew 
initiated an emergency evacuation in 
accordance with prescribed CTA pro- 
cedures. 

Some 165 "passengers" aboard the 
train sustained "injuries" of varying 
degrees. Most of the "victims" were 
medical students and others from 
Chicago City Colleges whose injuries 
were made up at two of the par- 
ticipating hospitals before they board- 
ed the train at Randolph/Wells. 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Above left: 

Safety Department Manager Tom Boyle ex- 
plains the purpose and goals of the disaster 
drill to a reporter near the entrance to the 
Quincy/Wells station. 

Above right: 

CTA buses were used to transport less 

seriously injured victims, attended by Fire 

Department paramedics, to participating 

hospitals. 

Left: 

Lorraine Anderson (center), chairperson of 
the hospital group that initiated the disaster 
drill, checks evacuation progress v/ith an 
assistant and Fred Mead, CTA Unit Super- 
visor, Safety Inspections/Investigations. 



When the Fire Department arrived 
at Quincy/Wells, the victims were 
sprawled, many with "broken" and 
"bleeding" limbs, all over the station 
platform and aboard the train. 
Evacuation to the street included the 
use of snorkels for those most serious- 
ly injured. 

After being brought to the street, the 
victims were taken to various triage 
stations, according to the extent of 
their injuries. Medical teams then 
evaluated and treated the victims 
before sending them off to designated 
hospitals. 

Fire Department and private am- 
bulances were used to move the most 
seriously injured, while CTA buses 
with paramedics aboard transported 
those who could walk. The Fire 



Department's Chief Medical Officer at 
the scene declared the area clear an 
hour and 17 minutes after the first 
emergency call was received. 

Safety Department Manager Tom 
Boyle said that "Although this drill was 
held primarily for the benefit of the 
hospital people, CTA also learned and 
profited from it. We found some areas 
where we can improve our involve- 
ment with the Fire Department and 
other agencies. The spirit of coopera- 
tion displayed was well received by all 
concerned." 

Boyle said CTA's participation in 
the drill involved several departments. 
Besides Fred Mead and Dick Gross, 
also from Safety, these included in- 
structors under the direction of Art 
Hubbard (Rail) and Bill Thompson 



(Bus), and Transportation personnel 
supervised by Ludwig Scheuerle, 
district superintendent — South Rail, 
who at the time was acting area 
superintendent. Rail Service. 
Observers from Facilities Maintenance 
were also on hand, led by Len 
Wiksten, director. 

Lorraine Anderson, chairperson of 
the hospital group, called the disaster 
drill "an excellent experience for 
everyone involved." Anderson, who is 
associate administrator of the Fantus 
Health Center at Cook County 
Hospital, also commended Boyle for 
his planning efforts, saying, "it is ap- 
parent from his active participation 
that he is very much concerned with 
emergency medical services issues that 
plan for public safety and make it a 
priority." 



1983 



Vol 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



17 




'Team CTA' trophy winners (from left) Jack Sowchin, Sfiaron Bosan, and Don Bruno. 



When you hear the names of Mario 
Andretti, Al Unser, or Janet Guthrie 
you may think of the Indianapolis 500, 
but the names Jack Sowchin, Don 
Bruno. Don Moy, or Sharon Bosan 
are not likely to make you think of a 
race track. 

Yet this foursome, unofficially called 
"Team CTA." is active from April to 
October in the daring weekend sport 
of Solo 11 Competition, sometimes 
called autocross. sanctioned by the 
Chicago Region of the Sports Car 
Club of America. 

Solo II competitions are generally 
held on paved, flat surfaces through 
courses consisting of straight sections. 
curves, and slaloms that resemble 
miniaturized road racing courses. The 
courses are laid out with gates marked 
by rubber pylons, and they emphasize 
car handling skills and maneuverability 
rather than straight-line performance. 
Drivers compete for the fastest time 
through the course, and time penalties 
are added to their scores if they 
displace or knock down pylons 

Competitors are grouped into 



SOLO RACING 
WITH TEAM CTA' 



classes designated by the letters "A" 
through "H". with vehicles of similar 
performance characteristics competing 
in each class. Classes are further 
broken down into Stock. Street 
Prepared. Prepared, or Modified 
designations, indicating the amount of 
mechanical race preparation per- 
formed on the vehicles. 

Jack Sowchin. director of Publica- 
tions. Public Affairs/Consumer Ser- 
vices, is the 1983 Solo II. "C Street 
Prepared" champion in the Chicago 
Region Championship Series. A 
graphic designer by profession. 
Sowchin's skills at the track last sum- 
mer earned him more season points in 
his red 1979 Fiat X 1/9 than any other 
competitor in his class. 

"Solo racing is a safe and exciting 
way to learn the performance limits of 
my car and improve my driving tech- 
nique." said Sowchin. "Experience 



gained in solo competition can be ap- 
plied to everyday driving, especially 
when reacting to emergency situa- 
tions." 

Sowchin's interest in solo racing was 
kindled in 1980 when he began 
visiting local SCCA events. He fre- 
quently works at events as a technical 
inspector checking cars for safety stan- 
dards and other rules of compliance 
before they are allowed on the course. 

Don Bruno, a transit technician in 
Operations Planning, also works on 
technical inspections. He won second 
place honors in the Chicago Region's 
"D Stock" class in this year's solo rac- 
ing series, driving a silver 1983 
Volkswagen Rabbit GTI. The most ex- 
perienced of CTA's four autocross en- 
thusiasts. Bruno also enjoys building 
and maintaining cars, and has had his 
photographs of vehicles published in 
the "Illustrated Alfa Romeo Buyer's 
Guide." He is also a member of the 
Alfa Romeo Owners' Club and 
Scuderia del Portello. Alfa Romeo's 
vintage racing team. 

"Solo racing can mean some really 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Proper maneuvering, as demonstrated by 
Jack Sowchin, is extremely important for 
success in solo racing. 

fun weekends, and it's always a busy 
time," said Bruno. "Everyone works 
to make things run smoothly, and 
you're always in good company." 

Sharon Bosan, the 1983 Chicago 
Region "D Stock Ladies" champion, 
began racing just this year. "I push 
myself to finish without hitting too 
many pylons," said Sharon. "I find 
that the nice thing about racing is that 
you don't have to be anyone special to 
participate." 

Through her participation in solo 
racing, Sharon has learned to do 
much of her own vehicle 
maintenance. "Autocrossing has 
helped me gain a knowledge of the 
maintenance that I need in order to 
meet the standards for racing," she 
said. "I've certainly gotten more out of 
this than I thought I would. The more I 
learn about cars, the better I like it." 

A finishing clerk in CTA's 
Duplicating Section, Sharon is also a 
part-time student at University of Il- 



linois, Chicago, majoring in computer 
science/mathematics. 

Lotus driver Don Moy who edits 
"Lotus Fetish," a publication for Lotus 
enthusiasts, is an architectural 
engineer at West Shops. Although he 
enjoys solo racing, his favorite type of 




Cornering, like maneuverability, is an 
essential key for the solo racer. Sharon 
Bosan masters the skill in this event. 



competition is the road rally. 

"I enjoy rallying most because it 
means constant driving for about three 

hours on public roads and I enjoy 

driving. The team of driver and 
navigator must work together to find 
their way to specific geographic check 
points on schedule. 

"Solo racing is for the die-hard who 
keeps a car in shape. It requires 
spending most of the day at an event 
to participate in about three minutes of 
intense driving competition." 

The Solo II racing season, which 
was once limited only to sports car 
drivers, now brings drivers of every 
type of car to a series of weekend 
autocross events. The atmosphere 
and conditions approach road racing 
in every way except the absence of car 
against car, "wheel to wheel", com- 
petition. Anyone interested in par- 
ticipating or observing may contact 
Jack Sowchin, Don Bruno, Sharon 
Bosan, or Don Moy for details. 




Don Moy drives his Lotus Europa in road rallies and solo races. 




SCCA 



Chief of Tech Mark Schmechter (left) and Sowchin (right) prepare to inspect a 'B Modified' 
class race car driven by Ricardo Gonzales (center). 



The Chicago Region of the Sports 
Car Club of America was organized in 
1948 to encourage the ownership and 
operation of sports cars, and to serve 
as a source of technical information for 
sports car enthusiasts. Although it was 
once necessary to own a sports car to 
become an SCCA member, member- 
ship is now open to anyone who 
wishes to affiliate with SCCA and par- 
ticipate in its activities. SCCA's nation- 
wide program includes road racing, 
solo racing, road rallying, and many 
other related activities. 



7983 



Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



19 




A Feast for Dagmar 

Jack Hardy, Manager, Materials (retired), visits CTA 
friends. The occasion was a retirement luncheon for 
Dagmar McNamara, Materials Management coordinator 
(2nd from right), who ended her CTA career after 36 years. 
Ms. McNamara received an electronic typewriter as a gift 
from her coworkers who sponsored the Como Inn farewell 
feast. Besides her former boss, the well-wishers include 
(from left) Edna Southworth, Jean O'Neil, and Aileen 
Madden. 



Worland Retires 



Its a happy moment for Claude Worland, Law Department 
witness location clerk, as he is feted by coworkers on the oc- 
casion of his retirement. A CTA employee for 36 years, 
Worland spent his entire career in the Claims/Law Depart- 
ment. The former clerk now pursues his favorite pastime of 
music as a clarinet player with a local band. He and his wife, 
Ella Marie, reside in Villa Park. 




'A View from My Window 



A Surprise Baby Shower 



Graphic designer Alan Grady, Passenger Controls/Graphics, a 
painter since he was five years old, displays an acrylic painting of 
the Wacker-Wells- Franklin leg of the Chicago Loop, a scene 
which he sees daily. Dubbed "A View from fyly Window," the artist 
made sketches of the scene and transferred them to canvas at his 
home on Chicago's northwest side. Grady said the project was 
done largely on weekends and look approximately two months. 



Monica Loye, administrative secretary (center) to Andrew 
Schmidt, area superintendent. Contract Administration, Labor 
Relations Department, is surrounded by CTA friends and co- 
workers who surprised her with a baby shower luncheon at the 
M&M Club September 16. CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli was 
also on hand to extend best wishes as Mrs. Loye prepared to take 
maternity leave. Among co-workers attending the shower were 
(from left), front row: Ann Murphy-Gaughan, Diane Traxler; second 
row: Rose f/cGuire, Kathleen Cunniff, Arthella Brown, James Bid- 
will, and James Marshall: Back row: Gus Alevizos, Andrew 
Schmidt, and Robert O'Connor, manager. Labor Relations. 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Earns master's degree 




Charles Townsend, a maintenance train- 
ing specialist at Lawndale Garage, was 
graduated from Chicago State University 
in June with a master of science degree in 
industrial supervision. Townsend, who 
joined CTA in 1969, also holds a bachelor 
of science degree from Chicago State in 
occupational education, an associate of 
arts degree from Olive-Harvey College In 
electronics and a diploma from Allied 
School of Mechanical Trades, Townsend 
and his wife, the former Mary J. Cain, are 
the parents of a daughter, Patricia. 



Earns bachelor's degree 




Ralph Newell, a journeyman mechanic at 
South Shops Brake Section, received a 
bachelor of science degree In occupa- 
tional education from Chicago State 
University. Newell joined CTA September 
24, 1979. 



Completes Exam 




Mrs. Cozette Epps-Buckney, daughter of 
Superintendent and Mrs. John C. White, 
69th Street Garage (retired), has suc- 
cessfully completed the Chicago Board of 
Education's first principal's examination 
given In nine years. Mrs. Buckney who has 
been associated with the Board of Educa- 
tion for 13 years, is presently assistant 
principal at Austin High School. 



Little league coaches 

keeping eyes on 

'84 season 

Two former Army sergeants whose 
friendship dates back to the early 60's 
through military stints in Korea, and 
Fort Knox, Ky., have developed a 
bascbcJI savvy which would surely 
have been a great Christmas gift for 
the Chicago Cubs. 

District "A" Supervisor Jimmy L. 
Clemons, and Operator Claude 
Blocker, 69th Street Garage, manag- 
ed and coached respectively last sum- 
mer, one of little league baseball's 
most successful teams in the Chicago 
area. 

Their team, Huddle Inn of south 
suburban Harvey, recorded a sensa- 
tional 20-1 season, with 18 con- 
secutive victories, to win the Harvey 
Little League World Series playoffs 
(National League). 

Huddle's success was due in part to 
the superb pitching of demons' own 
son, James, one of two of Huddle's 
pitching staff mainstays last summer. 
The younger Clemons finished the 
season 8-0 with two shutouts, 79 
strikeouts, and 19 walks in the 42 inn- 
ings he hurled last season. Clemons 
also won one of the two championship 
games, and maintained a season bat- 
ting average of .433. 

Derik Blocker, son of Coach Claude 
Blocker, drove in the winning run for 
the last game of the season which gave 
the Huddle the championship. 
Blocker recorded a season batting 
average of .422. 

Coach Blocker, who has spent his 
entire 16'/2 years with CTA as a driver 
out of 69th Street Garage, and 
Clemons, a 14-year CTA veteran, 
have both been associated with the 
Harvey Little League organization 
since 1979, and have led their teams 
to 39 wins and 18 losses. Clemons 
and Blocker were also assisted with 
their champions by Coach Dave 
McFadden, a resident of Harvey. 

"We're very optimistic about next 
season," said Clemons. "We plan to 
be just as good next year," he said. 



Hole-in-One 

Sheldon Rita, a Kimball Shop retiree, 
recorded a hole-in-one at the Glen Eagles 
Community Club golf course Septem- 
ber 11. 



50 Years 




Mr and Mrs. Arnold Walker observed their 
50th wedding anniversary at Fisherman's 
Inn In Elburn, III. on October 23. Attending 
the celebration in honor of the retired CTA 
carpenter of 33 years and his wife, were 
their son and daughter-in-law, the Rev. 
and Mrs. Arnold Walker Jr., and grand- 
daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Oliver 



California Retirees 




Robert Dietz (left), and Peter MIrkovich, 
retired CTA employees since 1955, are liv- 
ing in Anaheim, California. They fondly 
recall their years in Chicago and with the 
CTA. Dietz, 93, is former South Shops 
Electrical department foreman, and 
Mirkovich, 94, is former South Shops 
foreman. 



Golfing Foursome 




CTA retirees Tom Stiglic, W. Prosen, J. 
Spoo and Frank Wsol enjoying a golf 
outing at the Forest Preserve National. 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



21 



Walking with the Pros 




// the swing looks professional, it should. 
Joseph P. Piento, 17, walked with the pros 
this summer when he served as a caddy at 
the 80th Western Open Golf Tournament 
in Oak Brook. Piento, whose father, 
Joseph W., is senior power supervisor in 
the Control Center, was selected for the 
job by the Glenview Country Club. The 
younger Piento has maintained a 3.83 
grade average at Maine East High School 
in Park Ridge, where he has played on the 
golf team for three years. Now in his 
senior year, he plans to become a physics 
and chemical engineering major In col- 
lege, and has applied for an Evans 
scholarship for caddies. 



Hello World 




Yersenia I. Torres is the newborn 
daughter, and first child of 77th Street 
Garage Operator Esmeraldo Torres and 
his wife. Diana. Born September 2, 1983, 
little Yersenia weighed five pounds, six 
ounces, and was 18'/: inches long at birth. 
Her proud father said, "f^y wife and I 
waited eight years for our bundle of joy to 
arrive. Thank God." 



Ice Skater 




Five-year old John Schultz glides across 
the ice of a Clarendon Hills indoor rink as 
he participates in the play "Snow White." 
He is the nephew of Johnny Pope. CTA 
Treasury Department. 



Service anniversaries 


Ann Sloan. Accounting 
James Stewart. 77th Street 


in October 


Willie Walton. Jr.. Utility 
Jesse Whitehead. Lawndale 


40 Years 


Qfi VfT.nrc — 


fcv» I ccif a- 




John Antonucci, Desplaines Maint 


Jerry Blake, 


Charlie Bateman. 69th Street 


North Park 


Robert Burton. Buildings & Grounds 




Frank Espinosa. Archer 




Ronald Knox. Beverly 








Bill Limanowski. Far North 










.^^^ - 




Robert Nugent. West Section 




i^^Sts^' ' 




Donald Rouse. Building & Grounds 




j^^^BK^A ' 




Anthony Scardina. Accounting 




i^^^^^^^^Ei w ' 




Phyllis Shields. Accounting 




Wf^P^i^. 




Miles Smith. Bus Instruction 






Otis White. 77th Street 




'■^^:ibwi V 




Kiizimer Yaworski. Forest Glen 




^h 




Service anniversaries 




^^1__?Lh 




in November 








Robert Koster. 






Forest Park 




Robert Barclay. 77lh Street 














Charles Brown. Kedzie Maint 




• J 




James Cooney. Stores. South 






Frank Johnson. Purchasing 




t'^'^p^b 




Walter Jones. Lawndale 






Robert Kennedy. 77th Street 




y^i^^^S 




Kenneth Mikota. Facil. Eng & Maint 




^dZSHflv 




Albert Ochwat. District D 




/ ^wMipt' 




Angelo Salvaggio. Douglas/Congress 








30 Years^-= 






Sherman Adams, Beverly 
George Barber, Archer 


John Phillips. 


Administrative Services 


Jan Broda. Skokie Shops 




Giuliano Caruso. Forest Glen Maint 




Melvin Clarke, Howard /Kimball 


35 Years 


John DeGroat. 77th Street 
Joseph Drew. Beverly 




Aaron Fairfax. North Avenue 


Robert Booth, Power Distribution 


George Grafer. Forest Glen 


Matthew Cioffe, Power Distribution 


Richard Hannigan. South Shops 


Robert Fuhrman, Jr., South Shops 


Joe Horace. 77th Street 


Augustus Hennelly, North Park Maint 


Ernest Hunter. Beverly 


Edward Kruszyna, Power Distribution 


Arcedus Jones. Beverly 


Robert Kurtz, Support Services Bus 


Wayne Lambert. Jr.. 69th Street 


Walter Rafa, Jefferson Park 


Michael McCarthy. North Avenue 


Robert Reding, Skokie Shops 


Leoniud Perry. District B 


Max Tsuchida, North Park Maint 


Lucius Priester. Jr.. 69th Street 


30 v»^^- 


Arthur Thomas. Claims 
Calvin Webb. Archer Maint. 




Charles Williams. Lawndale 


Pete Colombo, Desplaines Maint 


Mack Williams. Ashland 61st 95th 


Gabriel Rgueroa, Archer Maint 
Frank Goodrich, Utility 


25 Years 


Andrew Grabowski, North Avenue 




Charles Hollingsworth. Utility 


John Angelo. Control Center 


George Howard. Utility 


John Coleman. South District 


Charles Johnson. 77lh Street 


Margaret Conway. Claims 


Thomas McCann, District D 


Donald Johnson. Buildings & Grounds 


Albert Meeks. Track & Roadway 


Albert Kemnitz. Jefferson Park 


Darrold Mercure. Kimball Maint 


Benjamin Morris. Jr.. Control Center 


Melvin Miller. 69th Street 


Daniel O'Rourke. South Shops 


Eugene Paoli, North Park 


Ludwig Scheuerle. Rail Service 


Jefferv Quails. 77th Street 


Thomas Southern. 69lh Street 


Jewel Roberson. Beverly 


Phillip Stokes. 77th Street 



22 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Service anniversaries 
in December 

=40 Years = 



William Rooney, 

Far North 

35 Years E 

Quintus Bonds. 98th Maint 
Anthony Kraus, Utility 
Donald McCarthy, South Shops 
James McManus, Howard/Kimball 
Joseph Mikieta, North Park 
Cleo Newsome, South District 
Theodore Wright. 77th Street 



30 YearsE 



Louis Bieniek. Bus Instruction 

Marion Brittain, Jr.. 77th Street 

Ozie Davis. 69th Street 

Travis Dixon. 77th Street 

Harper Donahue, Jr.. 77th Street 

Benarrage Flenaugh, West Section 

Horace Flournoy, Jr.. 77th Street 

Clifford Last. Forest Glen 

Wardell Lee. Rail Janitors 

Walter Lemons. Jr.. Admin. /Perf, Control 

Robert Rees, Central District 

Reginald Sharp, 77th Street 

Lester Smith, Workers. Comp 



25 YearsE 



Mitsuo Ogata, Forest Glen 



New Pensioners 



ROY H. GAINES, Bus Operator 

Lawndale, Emp. 10-18-56 
RAYMOND R GONZALEZ, Bus Operator 

Archer, Emp. 10-17-60 
WILLIAM J HUNTER, Janitor 

Facilities Engr. & Maint , Emp. 2-05-51 
DAGMAR G McNAMARA, Materials Mgmt. 

Coordinator, Materials Mgmt., 

Emp. 3-10-47 

Materials Management, Emp. 3-10-47 
JOHN O. MULLIGAN, Clerk II 

61st St Terminal, Emp. 1-24-49 
MARVIN SALMANOFF, Bus Operator 

North Park, Emp. 8-20-53 



OLLIE O SANDERS, Bus Operator 

Limits, Emp 1-17-57 
EARL L THOMPSON, Collector 

North Avenue, Emp. 7-18-52 
CARL A. WAGGONER, Bus Operator 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-18-49 

Disability Retirements 

JOHN H. BAKER, JR , Bus Operator 

77th, Emp. 11-13-67 
CHESTER W BROWNING, Bus Operator 

North Park, Emp. 8-10-53 
SELMON ECHOLS, Trackman II 

Facilities Engr. & Maint., Emp 8-12-68 
QUINTON H. JAMES, Service Truck Chauf. 

Facilities Engr & Maint., Emp. 4-10-52 
ROSS LOMBARDO, Rail Janitor 

Madison & Wabash, Emp. 1-26-71 
VERNON MITCHELL, Rail Janitor 

Facilities Engr. & Maint , Emp. 6-14-65 
RANDOLPH G. ROBINSON, Bus Operator 

77th. Emp. 2-8-51 
GUSTAV W. ZEHLES, Conductor 

Jefferson Park, Emp. 5-27-63 



irq- 3S/IE]I^OI^I.A.I^ 



LEROY ANDERSON, 68, Plant Maintenance 

Emp 3-28-49. Died 9-27-83 
BERTHA B. ATKINSON, 76, North Section 

Emp. 11-1-71, Died 8-27-83 
WALTER C. AUGUSTYN, 74, Shops & 
Equipment 

Emp 3-13-43, Died 8-30-83 
THOMAS BACULA, 90, North Avenue 

Emp 1-3-24, Died 8-23-83 
FRED BEAUDOIN, 85, Shops & Equipment 

Emp. 8-10-26, Died 8-31-83 
ALFRED BLOOM. 92. North Section 

Emp 1-2-14, Died 8-8-83 
MICHAEL J BOCIAN, 72, Engineering 

Emp 12-1-45. Died 9-30-83 
PATRICK F. BROWN, 63. North Park 

Emp 3-6-44, Died 9-30-83 
JOHN B CAMERON, 82, South Section 

Emp 6-26-45, Died 8-6-83 
VIRGINIA R. CASHION. 68, Transportation 

Emp 2-3-44, Died 8-14-83 
JOHN DECKER, 86, Forest Glen 

Emp 2 14 27, Died 8-27-83 
GLENN DEWAR, 77, North Park 

Emp. 11-21-41, Died 9-16-83 
JAMES E DOHERTY, 60, Kimball 

Emp. 4-14-42, Died 8-5-83 
PAUL DOMKE, 87, South Section 

Emp 4-2-45, Died 8 9-83 
JAMES J. ERONCIG, 74, 77th Street 

Emp. 11-14-42, Died 9-21-83 
PATRICK GALLAGHER, 91, Devon 

Emp 3- 13-23. Died 9 20-83 
EDWARD P GRZENIA, 66, General Office 

Emp 1-8-48. Died 8-22-83 
LURA HENDERSON, 54, Archer 

Emp 9-26-57, Died 10-14-83 
GEORGE A KROLL, 84, Transportation 

Emp. 2-20 23. Died 9-5-83 
EDWARD KOSCIENSKI, 67, Limits 

Emp 4-28-42, Died 8-7-83 
EDWARD KULPIT. 71, Management Services 

Emp 11-24-41. Died 8-19-83 
STANLEY V LUKASIK. 72, 69th Street 

Emp. 2-3-43, Died 9-16 83 



MARIO S. MARIANO, 63, South Shops 

Emp. 3-19-46, Died 9-20-83 
JAMES C, MARTINEK, 73, South Section 

Emp. 12-5-38, Died 9-18-83 
LAWSON MATTHEWS, 57, District A 

Emp 1-18-49, Died 8-28-83 
JOHN MC CARRICK, 91, 77th Street 

Emp 5-10-44, Died 9-30-83 
JOHN L. MC GLYNN, 96, Transportation, 

Emp. 12-23-07. Died 8-1-83 
REDMOND T MC GOVERN, 78, West 

Section, Emp. 6 24-42, Died 9 29-83 
ALBERT C NADEAU, 90, 77th Street 

Emp 12-17-23. Died 9-5-83 
WILLIAM NASH, 58, North Section 

Emp. 2-2-49, Died 8-24-83 
SIDNEY A NETTLES, 68, 61st Street 

Emp. 8-1-44, Died 9-16-83 
JOHN P NOHELTY, 90, West Side 

Emp 4-23-23, Died 9 21-83 
MILES OLSEN, 71, Rail North 

Emp. 7-15-42, Died 8-6-83 
JAMES O'MALLEY, 97, Limits 

Emp. 1-26-10, Died 8-22-83 
THOMAS O'NEILL, 93, West Side 

Emp. 2-19-20, Died 9-16-83 
JOHN PORTER, 50, West Section 

Emp 8-28-69, Died 10-14-83 
ELBA PRESTON, 88, North Section 

Emp 9-12-23, Died 8-17-83 
GEORGE POPADICH, 94, Way & Structures 

Emp. 11-1-30, Died 8-23-83 
WALTER E. RICHARDS, 73. South Shops 

Emp. 8-11-47, Died 9-23 83 
ELEANOR A ROCHE. 86, Public Informa- 
tion, Emp. 2-16-43, Died 9-4-83 
DUCIS RODRIQUE, 47, Limits Maintenance 

Emp, 9-27-68, Died 8-16-83 
HELEN ROMAN, 55, Operations Planning 

Emp. 9-16-74, Died 9-19-83 
EDWARD H. SCHROEDER, 83, Shops & 

Equipment, Emp. 2-1-18, Died 8-4-83 
GLEN A. SEPKE, 71, Kedzie 

Emp 2-18-36, Died 9-4-83 
ELEANOR G SHALLBETTER, 69, Rail 

North, Emp 8-15-64, Died 9-7-83 
DANIEL E SHERRAD, 75, Shops & Equip 

ment, Emp. 1-16-24, Died 8-5-83 
ARTHUR SMITH, 81, Construction & 

Maintenance, Emp. 10-9-41, Died 8-16-83 
PAUL L. SPOLEC, 70, Shops & Equipment 

Emp. 2-3-25, Died 8-24-83 
JULIUS B. SUKIS, 73, North Avenue 

Emp 4-18-44, Died 9-21-83 
ANTHONY J SULLIVAN, 77, Construction 

& Maintenance, Emp 5-24-34, Died 9-11-83 
JOSEPH A TAGLER, 79, Office Services 

Emp 11-20-29, Died 9-16-83 
THOMAS VALENZIA, 78, Forest Glen 

Emp. 11-16-43, Died 9-29-83 
EDWARD A. WEISS, 79, Forest Glen 

Emp. 5-5-42, Died 9-30-83 
FRANK H. WEISS. 67, North Avenue 

Emp. 7-26-43. Died 9-8-83 
SHIRLEY WILLIS, 51, 77th Street 

Emp. 5-23-57, Died 9-14-83 
CECIL E WYRE, 62, Forest Glen 

Emp 12- 19-60, Died 8-26-83 
JOSEPH H ZAHUMENSKY, 79, Shops & 

Equipment. Emp. 7-26-41, Died 8-25-83 
CARL P ZARUBA, 83, Forest Glen 

Emp 10-10-28, Died 9-10-83 
FRANK G ZIMA, 83, West Side 

Emp 1 29-34, Died 8-10-83 
GEORGE O ZORN, 86, North Park 

Emp 7-30-45, Died 8-26-83 



1983 Vol. 36—Nos. 11 & 12 



23 




,4s CM painter Jim Downes (left) 
provides the paint, CTA Ctiairman 
Micliaei A. Cardan dips a brush. 
Cardilli, State Representative Ellis B. 
Levin (third from left), and 46th Ward 
Alderman Jerome M. Orbach prepare 
to give the Wilson Avenue '/.' station 
the symbolic first stroke of paint to 
start the work of sprucing up the sta- 
tion located in the heart of Uptown. 



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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 36 Numberll&12 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart. 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager 

Director of Publications; Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 

Contributing Writers: Ted Radakovic, 

Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 

Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage, 
ment Services Department 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees Annual subscription price lo 
others, $5 CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Marl Plaza, PO Box 3555, Chicago. II. 
linois 60654 



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